Author Topic: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake  (Read 2352 times)

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Online enchant

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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #50 on: November 29, 2015, 06:22:40 AM »
--pat--


Offline HBolte

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Offline Dptdpt

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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #52 on: November 29, 2015, 09:25:07 AM »
Using Craig's fermenting table:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26831.msg394399#msg394399
I tried cold fermenting for a couple days, then 2.5 hours on the counter (68 degrees).  The result felt cold and dense when I was stretching it, and it didn't taste as good as the unruly mess I made last time with a pure RT ferment.  I'd like to try going with RT again, but the yeast amounts in that table are incredibly small.
"9. IDY, 0.012%, fermented for 18 hours at RT = 80 degrees F, then punched down and re-kneaded ... "
For my 1 lb dough ball, that comes out to 0.037 grams of yeast.  How do you measure that?  By the granule?

Presumably it was cold because the container you put it in was insulated enough that it didn't warm up in the 2.5 hours you had it on the counter. But I don't think it being cold is a problem. Not sure why it was dense though. What was you hydration percent?  Type of flour?  How did you mix it?  Lots of variables...

And why did you compute the room temp yeast percent at 80 degrees?  That's pretty warm. Why not the 68 degree temp you center is at?  Isn't that RT in your house?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #53 on: November 29, 2015, 09:37:00 AM »
I don't understand what they're asking with "Salt per liter of water".

In Naples, when dough is made, the water is the first thing that goes into the bowl; then salt, yeast, and finally flour. Ingredients are often expressed as a function of the weight of water in the same way as we often express quantity in terms of baker's % here. Per 1kg / 1l water is a common frame of reference for formulas.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2015, 09:39:51 AM by TXCraig1 »
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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #54 on: November 29, 2015, 09:47:33 AM »
Presumably it was cold because the container you put it in was insulated enough that it didn't warm up in the 2.5 hours you had it on the counter. But I don't think it being cold is a problem. Not sure why it was dense though. What was you hydration percent?  Type of flour?  How did you mix it?

Thin tupperware-like bowl.  60% hydration, KA bread flour, mixed with stand mixer.

Quote
And why did you compute the room temp yeast percent at 80 degrees?  That's pretty warm. Why not the 68 degree temp you center is at?  Isn't that RT in your house?

That wasn't my computation.  I was just quoting from that thread, as that example is similar to what I want to do (24 hour RT ferment).  With my lower room temperature, my yeast amount will be greater, but not to the point where it'd be enough to measure with any tools available outside of a laboratory.
--pat--

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #55 on: November 29, 2015, 09:54:44 AM »
For my 1 lb dough ball, that comes out to 0.037 grams of yeast.  How do you measure that?  By the granule?

You can measure pretty small quantities with decent accuracy using a scale with 0.1g precision. For example, dissolve 3.7g yeast into 96.3g water and 1.0g of the resulting solution would have 0.037g yeast.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #56 on: November 29, 2015, 09:57:12 AM »
Ok, that's an interesting solution.  Thanks!
--pat--

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #57 on: November 29, 2015, 10:08:39 AM »
Pat,

As you can see, I and another member had a bit of fun with small amounts of yeast at Replies 55 and 56 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=7225.msg78615#msg78615.

Peter

Offline Soulboy

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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #58 on: November 29, 2015, 10:51:27 AM »
I am using one of these: http://www.ebay.com/ulk/itm/271969964423

Lots of cheap options on eBay.
Effeuno p134h
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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #59 on: November 29, 2015, 11:50:13 AM »
It's amazing the amount of math that has been performed on this website.  I wonder if it would be possible to calculate the amount of math...   Wait, this is getting out of control.
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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #60 on: November 29, 2015, 12:02:02 PM »
--pat--

Offline fagilia

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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #61 on: December 07, 2015, 01:11:03 AM »
Ahhhh to sad when the thread died i was exited about more CF VS RT even though it was not the original question.
Are everybody in the same opinion about CF sourdough? That CF promotes more acetic acid from the heterofermentative LAB?
We dont want sour pizza right?

About yeast the quesion is. Does longer time fermenting make a better taste (yes taste is extremly important according to me in the crust) and crust. The crust i think is personal but taste maby all can agree on something.
So if time makes a better taste. Is there a timelimit where you get over the hill and start to taste better?
If 48h cf goes against rt who will win and why? Will more higher alcohol and estrar be made during the cold temp?
What can you expect in difference in texture?
Can a 9 hour rt taste as good as a 24 h rt dough.
and so on. We will have to make tests.
Hahaha %$# my english is not so good :)

For original question. You must experiment. All flour make different pizza as well as other ingredients. It will be different strong. Some need 5 hours in ball some need longer. Some if they are to strong (elastic) will never be good. If one day to weak you must make shorter in ball and the other way around. Support on the side is a good way to make less developed gluten that still hold its shape until it reach the oven.
A pizza that you can handle will always be better than a more weak dough you can not handle. Thin spots and flour on the sides etc.
Only change 1 variable during experiments.
This is for both RT and CF. My opinion.


Offline Dptdpt

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Re: How long after I make my dough balls should I bake
« Reply #62 on: December 07, 2015, 01:31:15 AM »
Yes, easy to handle dough is definitely important!  My 2 day CF doughs have always come out great taste-wise, but not always so easy to handle. Thin spots, as you said, and the dough also tends to spread out and the balls stick together in my dough trays. I'm pretty much following the Varisano method to the letter, but I can't believe everyone would be happy with the usability of the dough I'm getting.