Author Topic: Slap and Stretch Technique  (Read 907 times)

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Offline Everlast

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Slap and Stretch Technique
« on: January 28, 2014, 01:05:32 PM »
Are members here still using this technique to open NP dough balls? I was using it for a while and then switched to just letting the dough stretch out over my knuckles in the air and then turning. Lately I've been taking extra steps to get excess flour off my open dough ball and I was thinking about going back to the slap and stretch technique which I think would knock a lot of excess flour off. Is the slap and stretch more suited for commercial environments and for speed?


Offline derricktung

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Re: Slap and Stretch Technique
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2014, 02:09:44 PM »
I actually utilize both techniques... slap and stretch, and then evaluate if there are spots that the slap and stretch didn't do well with, and use the drape over the knuckles to focus on those areas.

Offline Everlast

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Re: Slap and Stretch Technique
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2014, 02:31:24 PM »
That's a good idea, I'll have to give that a shot.

Offline Gags

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Re: Slap and Stretch Technique
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2014, 04:24:48 PM »
I found that it depends on the dough characteristics.

If they are relatively tight and tidy, they like the Neapolitan slap to open up, followed by the hand drape.
In these cases, the dressed pie is about the desired size of the finished product.

However, if they're very developed and slack, they risk getting blown out and developing holes.
In that case, I do the finger dimples, a few hand drapes, but keep the skin relatively small.
I dress it quickly and then open it up to the desired size after I slide it on the pala.
"I'd trade it all for just a little bit more"

Offline Everlast

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Re: Slap and Stretch Technique
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2014, 05:01:54 PM »
Gags, you make a really good point. It seems like most of the videos I've seen from pizzerias using the slap and stretch technique are using dough in the sub 60% HR range. For dough that is 62% and even more at 65%, the slap and stretch technique may be a bit rough on the dough.