Author Topic: Using the freezer to cool dough balls after mixing  (Read 571 times)

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Offline zzaa!

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Using the freezer to cool dough balls after mixing
« on: June 20, 2013, 11:59:15 PM »
Tom-
I was curious if putting dough balls into oiled ziplocks and streight into the freezer for an hour then moving to refrigeration has any negative effects on the dough. My thought was to quickly bring down finished dough temperature to retard fermentation.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Using the freezer to cool dough balls after mixing
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2013, 08:23:58 AM »
zzaa!,

As I noted in Reply 108 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12548.msg133508.html#msg133508 , I have placed dough in the freezer compartment for 45 minutes to cool it down quickly right after mixing. What becomes a factor is the weight and number of dough balls.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Using the freezer to cool dough balls after mixing
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2013, 08:28:45 AM »
zzaa!,

To add to my last post, the subject of freezing dough balls to cool them down a bit came up in this thread:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25221.msg254259.html#msg254259

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Using the freezer to cool dough balls after mixing
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2013, 08:58:09 AM »
Z;
Actually, you can put the dough balls into the freezer to help cool them down more efficiently, but I don't recommend using a Zip-Lok bag for this purpose for two reasons. 1) It is difficult to exclude all of the air from the bag so it's easy to end up with an insulating layer of dead air space around a portion of the dough ball which is counter productive when trying the freeze the dough ball. 2) in the event that some fermentation should take place (actually a probability) the Zip-Lok bad can burst, thus allowing the dough to dry out. A much better solution is to use either new or recycled bread bags. Just oil the dough ball and drop it into the bread bag, twist the open end to form a pony tail and tuck it under the dough ball as you place it into the freezer and then into the fridge. This approach will allow the bag to better handle any pressure developed when/if fermentation takes place without compromising the integrity of the bag, plus it is a lot easier to pull the bread bag down tight against the dough which improved the heat transfer properties, thus giving more efficient and consistent cooling of the dough. One home grown pizza maker brought it to my attention some time ago that they even save and reuse their bread bags by placing them into a plastic container for storage in the fridge. I've been pretty successful folding the used bags (these are the bags previously used for my refrigerated dough balls) and placing them into a Zip-Lok bag (see, there is a good use for those bags) for storage. Storing them in this manner keeps them cleaner and reduces any possibility of developing rancidity in the oil clinging to the inside of the bags.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


 

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