Author Topic: What differentiates a standard American Sicilian from Detroit style?  (Read 4726 times)

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Offline D C

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Re: What differentiates a standard American Sicilian from Detroit style?
« Reply #25 on: July 26, 2013, 05:29:19 PM »
So I had Buddy's pizza for lunch today.  Interestingly enough, THEY call their pizza Sicilian style.


Offline TheRailroadBulls

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Re: What differentiates a standard American Sicilian from Detroit style?
« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2015, 11:23:56 PM »
Haha.  I can't help but think that the old shops over-hype the importance of seasoned blue steel pans.  It's the one element that they can claim they have the advantage over as compared to home cooks.

The fact that the pans are blue steel means nothing. It is the SPECIFIC blue steel pans you use that matter. I'm talking for experience working for several shops, and the difference is incredible.

A lot of people get thicker steel, use less oil, and wonder why their product doesn't come out as planned. But you need a comparatively thin blue steel pan with slightly slanted sides, and you need to LIBERALLY oil it. My OLD SCHOOL Detroit pan is approx. 4 inches high (it's one of the original ones that was supposed to be used for auto parts..), and it's not stamped steel.... it's cut, wrapped, and then welded. You should oil the pan ALL the way up the sides as well, which is important, because most people who try to imitate this end up just burning a bunch of cheese, and frying only part of it.... so the taste isn't as delightfully potent. When the sides are high and relatively slanted, as the pan heats up the excess oils drip down from above and truly FRY the cheese instead of burn it.

Another key thing to note is that barely any Detroit shops (not Detroit STYLE... but actual DETROIT style shops IN DETROIT) par-bake, finish on the deck, or any of that other non-sense that people do to try and replicate the product. The truth is that 90% of our shops (again, I've worked at 3, and a lot of those guys had worked for places like Jets or Buddys in the past) use conveyor ovens, and throw the pizza in halfway through the belt, covered with a half sheet pan, and then when it comes out, the sheet pan is removed and it is thrown back in, but the second time it travels the full length of the belt. That's the big secret to most of the places. Another big thing they do is claw the daylights out of the crust after it's in the pan, leaving finger nail marks instead of docking, and reating pockets for sauce to rest in, so you can add more, without the cheese sliding around. I know of exactly ZERO shops that make true Detroit pizza that put their meats under the cheese or any of that non-sense so I have no idea where those rumors started. Supino and a few other places do it.... but they are 100% not Detroit style pizza, and they'll be the first to admit it.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice." - Henry Ford

Offline TheRailroadBulls

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Re: What differentiates a standard American Sicilian from Detroit style?
« Reply #27 on: June 11, 2015, 11:26:50 PM »
The fact that the pans are blue steel means nothing. It is the SPECIFIC blue steel pans you use that matter. I'm talking for experience working for several shops, and the difference is incredible.

A lot of people get thicker steel, use less oil, and wonder why their product doesn't come out as planned. But you need a comparatively thin blue steel pan with slightly slanted sides, and you need to LIBERALLY oil it. My OLD SCHOOL Detroit pan is approx. 4 inches high (it's one of the original ones that was supposed to be used for auto parts..), and it's not stamped steel.... it's cut, wrapped, and then welded. You should oil the pan ALL the way up the sides as well, which is important, because most people who try to imitate this end up just burning a bunch of cheese, and frying only part of it.... so the taste isn't as delightfully potent. When the sides are high and relatively slanted, as the pan heats up the excess oils drip down from above and truly FRY the cheese instead of burn it.

Another key thing to note is that barely any Detroit shops (not Detroit STYLE... but actual DETROIT style shops IN DETROIT) par-bake, finish on the deck, or any of that other non-sense that people do to try and replicate the product. The truth is that 90% of our shops (again, I've worked at 3, and a lot of those guys had worked for places like Jets or Buddys in the past) use conveyor ovens, and throw the pizza in halfway through the belt, covered with a half sheet pan, and then when it comes out, the sheet pan is removed and it is thrown back in, but the second time it travels the full length of the belt. That's the big secret to most of the places. Another big thing they do is claw the daylights out of the crust after it's in the pan, leaving finger nail marks instead of docking, and reating pockets for sauce to rest in, so you can add more, without the cheese sliding around. I know of exactly ZERO shops that make true Detroit pizza that put their meats under the cheese or any of that non-sense so I have no idea where those rumors started. Supino and a few other places do it.... but they are 100% not Detroit style pizza, and they'll be the first to admit it.

Also.... Sicilian bakes around 450 usually.... but most of our shops bake between 500-525 in the air impingement oven... so in a deck oven, I'm guessing it'd be the equivalent of 550-575.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice." - Henry Ford

Offline TheRailroadBulls

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Re: What differentiates a standard American Sicilian from Detroit style?
« Reply #28 on: June 11, 2015, 11:31:58 PM »
So I had Buddy's pizza for lunch today.  Interestingly enough, THEY call their pizza Sicilian style.

yup. They use aluminum pans w/ sauce on top. Definitely not Detroit style.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice." - Henry Ford


 

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