Author Topic: Flour for shaping the skin  (Read 650 times)

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Offline pdog

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Flour for shaping the skin
« on: June 26, 2013, 08:18:40 PM »
Hi,

What flour/flour combo do you guys use when stretching your skins?

I typically just use what ever flour I have lying around.  I even use AP since I have a bag currently collecting dust.

I was watching a NY joint make their pizza and they said semolina 50/50 with their pizza flour is the only way go to get a good skin.

Thoughts?


Offline jeffereynelson

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Re: Flour for shaping the skin
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2013, 08:31:51 PM »
I use the same flour I use to make the dough.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Flour for shaping the skin
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2013, 09:25:07 PM »
Various, sometimes cornmeal, sometimes semolina, but usually the same flour as the dough.  It depends upon what you are trying to do.  Semolina and cornmeal will both change the taste and texture of the finished pizza.

Offline slybarman

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Re: Flour for shaping the skin
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2013, 09:47:54 PM »
I went from 50/50 to 100% semolina and I think it really helped improve the pizza. The semolina doesn't stick and prevent browning the way flour can. I find it also helps make the cornice shell drier/crisper (not sure that is the best description exactly, but . . .)

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Flour for shaping the skin
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2013, 10:21:01 PM »
It makes it "toothier" is how I describe it.

Offline dhorst

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Re: Flour for shaping the skin
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2013, 10:36:55 PM »
When shaping I use a very small amount of AP.  For dusting the peel, wondra is my first choice followed by rice flour or fine semolina/durum flour.  The release of the wondra is wonderful.
For the love of Aleppo chile, ask and you shall receive.

Offline slybarman

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Re: Flour for shaping the skin
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2013, 06:54:41 AM »
It makes it "toothier" is how I describe it.

Sure - we'll roll with toothier. :))

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Flour for shaping the skin
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2013, 09:37:59 AM »
Dhorst;
Actually, Wondra flour is an "instantized" flour, meaning that it has been modified to absorb water very quickly. If this happens to the flour when used as a peel dust it can go from flour to a paste and help to glue the pizza skin to the peel if you are not fast to make the transfer from peel to oven. Another interesting peel dust is the use of Japanese bread crumbs. There is a commercial product available called "Crispit" and another called "Pizza Crisp" that are based on this aspect of the fine ground bread crumbs. With all of the interest in healthy eating these days we are also seeing greater use of different types of fiber materials used as a peel dust too. Fiber is actually a very good peel dust since it is so slow to absorb water/moisture, and when it does, it has a tremendous capacity to do so.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline pdog

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Re: Flour for shaping the skin
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2013, 05:38:57 PM »
Thank you all for your replies...... Look like more pizza is in my future.  I really hate how often I have to experiment.  haha. 

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Flour for shaping the skin
« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2013, 10:06:06 AM »
Pdog;;
I ride motorcycles during my free time and I liken pizza research/experimentation to a motorcycle trip where the journey is as much, or more, fun that the destination. You might be surprised to learn that a couple of noteable food items we have today actually started out as a mistake while making something else;
Schlotsky's sandwich bun was the result of the baker incorrectly scaling the water (too much) to make the bun. We all know how that turned out.
The pretzel is said to have been created when a baker was making a roll, as he was peeling the rolls into the oven one of the rolls fell off of the peel and landed in the container in front of the oven that held the water used to swab the wood ashes off of the oven deck. Wood ash is an alkali, so the water was presumably pretty alkaline. Since flour and dough were too hard to come by, he plucked the roll from the bucket, wiped it off (or so it is said) and proceeded to place it into the oven. Upon removal from the oven the roll looked different from all of the others (bright shiny appearance) and it tasted different too (like a pretzel rather than a roll), hence the pretzel was born.
Today's mistake, tomorrow's new food/pizza concept. :)
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor