Author Topic: Texas Pizza Summit 2  (Read 21954 times)

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Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #150 on: July 03, 2013, 01:27:42 PM »
Kelly, I just sent you an email because your inbox is full.

Gotcha.

Will look at it after meetings today.

Thanks. --K
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #151 on: July 03, 2013, 02:44:59 PM »
If you left your sunglasses here, I found them. Let me know and I'll send them back to you.
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #152 on: July 03, 2013, 02:58:22 PM »
I guess nobody got a picture, but limoncello was served Saturday night - thanks again to Kelly for the great recipe!
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Offline dhorst

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #153 on: July 03, 2013, 03:20:46 PM »
I guess nobody got a picture, but limoncello was served Saturday night - thanks again to Kelly for the great recipe!

Damn.  I didn't see that.  I haven't made limoncello in quite some time!  Off to the store for lemons!  In the meanwhile, here's a pic of some that I made last winter from some meyer lemons that a friend in California sent me!

Offline oknewell

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #154 on: July 03, 2013, 07:44:48 PM »
Recipe PLEASE

Offline TXCraig1

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Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #156 on: July 03, 2013, 07:54:51 PM »
Dear friends, I verily took delight in being with all of you at the Summit. It was not just a summit, but a celebration of our friendship, hard-earned achievements, and, above all, taking interest in the existence of one another. Dear Craig, I convey to you—and your wife—my deepest gratitude for allowing us to enjoy the warmth, comfort, and hospitality of your home. We are boundlessly grateful to you and your wife.

Finally, I had the chance to feel and taste Craig's dough. He was certainly the master of his dough on the bench, meaning that, he shaped the destiny of the dough—not the other way around. I clearly and repeatedly observed how unhesitatingly Craig manipulated, with certainty of thought and action, his dough on the bench, although the surrounding conditions were unpropitious. The ambient temperature was excessive (about 106°F); the air was highly humid; and Craig and the rest of us had plenty to drink. I remember that the flour on the bench felt markedly hotter than the humid atmosphere inside the garage, causing the damped bench flour to coagulate and become gluey on the fingers and palms. The problem was further aggravated if the hands started to sweat in that hot and humid environment.

When I proceeded to draft one of Craig's dough balls into a disc, I did not know what to expect. Upon the initial touch, I immediately perceived a buoyant and delicate dough ball, more delicate than I really preferred under the extant conditions. Hence, I instantaneously resolved to treat it with extra gentleness, but shortly I perceived in the dough a needed strength that was finely in tune with the dough's delicate temperament. At that point, I knew that the dough was no accident, but well-calculated. In other words, it possessed, at least for me, the right degree of extensibility and elasticity. In my estimation, a dough like that, in a commercial environment, won't allow the bancone to be turned into a battleground and the oven floor into a graveyard!

For me, Craig's mahogany pizza peel was complementary to the dough disc that I shaped and garnished with toppings. The wooden peel, which was handcrafted by Bill (Wheelman), faithfully consigned the pizza to the hearth.

With regard to the flavor, it is difficult for me to clothe it in words. Considering that Craig used sourdough culture as the single fermentative agent for his dough, suffice it to say that astute hints of sourness subtly embellished the overall flavor of the pizza base. Yet, it was not obvious that he used sourdough starter since the baked dough did not taste sour. Paradoxically, it was obvious that he did not use any kind of commercial yeast since the dough did not taste one- or two-dimensional. It had all the three dimensions: length, breadth, and depth. Exquisite!

With respect to Craig's Acunto oven, it is a beauty and beast in one package! In my opinion, it performed quite well under the aforementioned conditions. A number of things I noticed about the Acunto in relation to the Ferrara oven that I work with at Pizzeria Bruno (keep in mind that the former has an internal floor diameter of 120cm and the latter 130cm):

1. In contrast to the Ferrara at Bruno, Craig's Acunto has a distinctly narrower vent, which starts right above the oven door and leads up all the way to the chimney. Looking through the vent, I could see much less of the surface of the dome's arch below the chimney. 
2. In contrast to the Ferrara at Bruno, Craig's Acunto seems to have a thicker wall encircling the floor.
3. In contrast to the Ferrara at Bruno, Craig's Acunto appears to have a thicker floor and foundation (put together as one whole), at least by 2 to 3 inches.
4. In contrast to the Ferrara at Bruno, I clearly felt that Craig's Acunto has a smaller door in both the vertical and horizontal planes.
5. In contrast to the Ferrara at Bruno, it appears that Craig's Acunto has a flatter surface on the central zone of the dome.
6. In contrast to the Ferrara at Bruno, the Acunto's dome and floor are composed of what appears to be different types of bricks. They are of different color (grayish) and dimensions (larger in size, if I am not mistaken).
7. In contrast to the Ferrara at Bruno, the Acunto's four floor tiles have different color and texture, judging by what is visible on their surface. The Ferrara's floor at Bruno has a light clayish color, whereas the Acunto's floor is gray in color, like a polished, ordinary rock. Moreover, The Ferrara's floor at Bruno seems to have a softer clayish texture, with multitude of very tiny holes all over the surface. The Acunto's floor appeared to have a harder rocky texture, with less tiny holes residing on its surface. I should mention that I have seen Ferrara ovens that are equipped exactly with the same type of floor tiles as Craig's Acunto. The Ferrara oven, which is a permanent one, at Caffe Calabria in San Diego is an example.



It is obviously premature for me to conclusively judge the long-term performance of Craig's Acunto; nonetheless, based on my limited observations and the personal experience that I had with Craig's Acunto last Saturday and Sunday, it appears that both ovens are compatible with one another. By the way, Craig and I checked out the wood-fired oven at Pizaro's Pizza last Monday. See the 1st picture below. The oven operator at Pizaro kindly allowed me to take a brief look inside the oven, which was built by Forno Napoletano. At the first glance, the interior of the oven looked different, in terms of construction and the materials, than Craig's Acunto and Bruno's Ferrara, to a lesser or greater degree. I could not gaze at the oven interior long enough as the oven operator began to feel uncomfortable with my presence there. Pizaro is the only Neapolitan pizzeria in all of Houston, which is supposed to be the 4th largest city in the US. (http://www.pizarospizza.com) The owner declared that he is already in the process of opening up a second branch soon in Houston. I wish him success.

I thank you guys for posting all the preceding pictures. I think more pictures would have been posted here if some camera operators had used tripods! :-D Unfortunately, I shot no more than 3 pizza pictures; I was too preoccupied with chatting and stuffing myself. Below are the few pictures that I shot.

I would like to sincerely thank Chau for the fresh mozzarella that he prepared for us, Diana for the wonderful cheese selection, Gene for the tasty ice cream, Hunt brothers for the delicious Detroit-style pizzas which I had never experienced before, Tom for the breakfast pizzas (of which I got only one leftover slice because I woke up too late), Bill for the wine and for kindly picking me up at the airport, Norma for the heartfelt hug she gave me upon my arrival there, Peter and Scott for accompanying me at the kitchen sink (I washed, Scott rinsed, and Peter dried), Peter for the wine, John (Serpentelli) who was there in spirit (i.e., Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey), and Java (a puppy-sapien) who mitigated the pain of being away from my puppy. Please, forgive me if I have forgotten anyone. I thank all the Texas Pizza Summit participants for their care and friendship. I look forward to seeing you all again. Happy 4th of July!

Omid
« Last Edit: July 03, 2013, 08:08:33 PM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #157 on: July 03, 2013, 08:13:01 PM »
I miss Java very much!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #158 on: July 03, 2013, 08:53:46 PM »
Omid, you are poet-in-pizzaiolo.
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage


Offline parallei

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #159 on: July 03, 2013, 09:01:52 PM »
"Ain't but three things in this world that's worth a solitary dime
But old dogs and children and watermelon wine."

Tom T. Hall

Keep the photo's coming.  Its great fun......
« Last Edit: July 03, 2013, 09:59:14 PM by parallei »

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #160 on: July 03, 2013, 09:59:52 PM »
I have had time to recover (and it took 3 days), so here is my take on the weekend.  Obviously the pizza was outstanding, but the draw for me was talking to the people.   I got to spend time talking with Antoine and Bill about ovens, Norma about her relentless pursuit of perfection of style, Omid about life, and pizzamaking with everyone.  The focus was pizza, but the fun was sharing a common interest.  There were no agendas or goals, we were all there to make and eat pizzas.  We ate, we drank (maybe a little too much for me), we pushed out dough into round shapes and baked them, and celebrated our shared addiction.

Hopefully we all learned a little about each other and the pursuit of pizza, and thank you for not using a black magic marker on me Sunday morning Gene.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #161 on: July 03, 2013, 10:12:19 PM »
Oh, and I only took 3 pictures.

1. A Detroiter.
2. Clam pie as it begins.
3. Random pic of the garage in full swing.

Offline Falcor

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #162 on: July 03, 2013, 11:32:59 PM »
Presumptuous, I concede, but I predict a TXCraig1 and Pizza Napoletana venture!!...when it happens, I am there!

Adam


Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #163 on: July 04, 2013, 02:39:30 AM »
Omid, you can see some of the differences here between the Ferrara M130 used at Bruno and the Acunto Mario Classico 5 that Craig has in the links below.

While the height/depth of the floor and foundation are almost the same on both ovens (13.7795" Acunto & 13.50" Ferrara), the oven door is significantly wider on the Ferrara oven, by just over three inches.

Acunto Mario Guide and Specifications:

http://media.wix.com/ugd//803c05_267bbcb591faf5cbcacaa2e7a13109ad.pdf

Stefano Ferrara Model 130 Specifications Sheet:

http://www.artisanpizzasolutions.com/PDF/130_SF_OvenSpecSheet_FINAL.pdf

It should be noted that Stefano Ferrara ovens are now different than the ones employed at many places (Bruno, Paulie Gee's Brooklyn, Nomad, etc.). The exterior shape and shelves for dinner plates are much different in the newer models (I prefer the look of the newer models).  I am not sure if they have made the floor and foundation on the newer Ferrara ovens deeper than the older models like those employed at Bruno.  However, it does appear that the same number of tile rows run from the base of the foundation to the iron door of the oven in both newer and older models. So the height/depth of the foundation and cooking floor appears to be the same.

Finally, if you look at page three of the Acunto user guide I linked to above, there is a shot of the dome which looks just like the photo of the dome in the refractory chamber of Craig's oven, as taken by Norma in picture 015.JPG in Reply #9 of this thread (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26074.msg263023.html#msg263023). The gaps between the bricks where the mortar is are mostly uniform in size and the bricks are closely fitted together.  For the most part, there appears to be some offsetting of the brick rows so that lines of mortar do not run in a straight(ish) line through too many rings/levels of bricks.

On the recent article on Slice about Motorino returning to Brooklyn, there was a shot of the dome of Palombino's new Stefano Ferrara oven (http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2013/06/interview-with-mathieu-palombino-at-motorino-williamsburg-brooklyn-slideshow.html#show-335105)

The mortar appears to have significantly seeped through the bricks in places, particularly near the dome and in the first ring of horizontally placed bricks that start on top of the vertical ring of bricks (the vertical bricks touch the cooking floor). It is difficult to tell if the fitting of the bricks is even and closely aligned, but obscured by the heavier amount of mortar....or if there are various sized cuts of bricks in some places that are not tightly fit together and mortar has been relied on to hold the oven together in those areas. I'm guessing it is the former and not the latter.

Probably not a big deal and I cannot wait to receive my Ferrara ovens, but at 2:47 at night the mind wanders at times. --K

« Last Edit: July 04, 2013, 02:47:45 AM by pizzablogger »
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #164 on: July 04, 2013, 07:57:05 AM »
Omid, you can see some of the differences here between the Ferrara M130 used at Bruno and the Acunto Mario Classico 5 that Craig has in the links below.

While the height/depth of the floor and foundation are almost the same on both ovens (13.7795" Acunto & 13.50" Ferrara), the oven door is significantly wider on the Ferrara oven, by just over three inches.

Acunto Mario Guide and Specifications:

http://media.wix.com/ugd//803c05_267bbcb591faf5cbcacaa2e7a13109ad.pdf

Stefano Ferrara Model 130 Specifications Sheet:

http://www.artisanpizzasolutions.com/PDF/130_SF_OvenSpecSheet_FINAL.pdf

The way I understood Omid's comment about the floor height is that the SF floor is not actually as thick as it would appear in the spec sheet. He commented that if you look up from underneath, you will see that the floor thickness is actually several inches less than it would appear from the front elevation, stopping well before the bottom of the base. This is in contrast to the Acunto where the floor extends all the way to the bottom of the base. This would of course be an observation based on the oven at Bruno and may be different than the newer ovens as you noted. Omid can correct me if I'm wrong.

I did not realize the new Acunto ovens are adjustable in height. Mine is not.
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #165 on: July 04, 2013, 08:05:13 AM »
Finally, if you look at page three of the Acunto user guide I linked to above, there is a shot of the dome which looks just like the photo of the dome in the refractory chamber of Craig's oven, as taken by Norma in picture 015.JPG in Reply #9 of this thread (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26074.msg263023.html#msg263023). The gaps between the bricks where the mortar is are mostly uniform in size and the bricks are closely fitted together.  For the most part, there appears to be some offsetting of the brick rows so that lines of mortar do not run in a straight(ish) line through too many rings/levels of bricks.

On the recent article on Slice about Motorino returning to Brooklyn, there was a shot of the dome of Palombino's new Stefano Ferrara oven (http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2013/06/interview-with-mathieu-palombino-at-motorino-williamsburg-brooklyn-slideshow.html#show-335105)

The mortar appears to have significantly seeped through the bricks in places, particularly near the dome and in the first ring of horizontally placed bricks that start on top of the vertical ring of bricks (the vertical bricks touch the cooking floor). It is difficult to tell if the fitting of the bricks is even and closely aligned, but obscured by the heavier amount of mortar....or if there are various sized cuts of bricks in some places that are not tightly fit together and mortar has been relied on to hold the oven together in those areas. I'm guessing it is the former and not the latter.

Probably not a big deal and I cannot wait to receive my Ferrara ovens, but at 2:47 at night the mind wanders at times. --K

When I first received the oven, my dome looked very similar to the picture of the Motorino dome with respect to the patches of mortar flush up against the ceiling. After firing it for a few months, some small pieces started falling off, so I brushed it lightly a few times to reveal the dome as you see it now in Norma's picture.
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline f.montoya

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #166 on: July 04, 2013, 10:26:40 AM »
It's 11:20pm at night here. I'll be heading to bed soon, but DAMN!! I'm hungry!!!

I saw this Detroit pie and really want a piece or two of it...

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=26074.0;attach=124777;image

Craig, your pies look awesome! Your dough looks immaculate. Love your oven. If they sold those in Japan(or to JP residents), I would've bought one long ago!!

The only bright side for me is I have friends coming this Saturday from Tokyo and Osaka, including their families. I finally get to fire up the oven and make some pies. Until then, I'll just re-read and drool over the pics in this thread!!  ;D


Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #167 on: July 04, 2013, 10:46:42 AM »
The over-grouting is just an artifact of the method of construction, i.e. they set the bricks on falsework then pour a very liquid refractory grout to fill the gaps.  As Craig says, it is a very thin amount of material and can be removed if wanted.

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #168 on: July 04, 2013, 04:05:44 PM »
Omid, you are poet-in-pizzaiolo.
I agree. How fortunate we are to have you writing on this forum, Omid. I so enjoyed  reading about the Pizza Summit II through your unique and poetic lens. Thanks.

Regards,

TinRoof

Offline p.elkjaer

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #169 on: July 05, 2013, 06:36:25 AM »
Great post. I would have loved to be there.

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #170 on: July 05, 2013, 07:42:31 PM »
Myself and others members had a nice chat with Omid later Saturday evening.  Omid's knowledge is amazing.  I had to laugh about the siren singing women.  I think Michelle, Bill and I all got a good laugh out of that.  It is about Greek mythology and goes something like this if I recall right.  The term "siren song" refers to an appeal that is hard to resist but that, if heeded, will lead to a bad conclusion.  From the songs of the sirens in Greek mythology, whose bewitching song lured mariners to their doom.  Maybe Omid can explain that better than I can if he wants to.

Norma

Dear Norma, I'd be glad to . . . The story of Sirens and Odysseus (or "Ulysses" in Italian) is a significant part of the history of Naples. Naples has two distinct histories that are sometimes not easy to distinguish from one another: (1) Neapolitan history according to the myths and (2) Neapolitan history according to historians. In Homer's epic poem "The Odyssey" (which is about the adventures of Odysseus on his voyage to home after the fall of Troy), he did not describe and name the Sirens. Many later authors identified them as beautiful, winged women who possessed seductive singing voices. Homer mentioned only two Sirens, but most later writers spoke of three. They lived on an island called Anthemöessa, near the Gulf of Naples. Although the name is no longer in usage, varying accounts ascribe Anthemöessa to either the island of Ischia (where the Ischia sourdough culture is from) or Capri in the Gulf of Naples. (See the first picture below.) Basically, when sailors sailed near the island, the Sirens' song would allure them, causing them to steer toward the rocks and sink upon impact with them.
 
As claimed by the legends, history of Naples begins when Parthenope (one of the Sirens) was drowned and washed ashore on the Bay of Naples. When Parthenope’s singing voice could not allure Odysseus (because he had himself tied to the mast and the ears of his men plugged with wax), she became distraught and threw herself into the sea. (See the 2nd picture hereunder.) Her corpse was washed up to the islet of Megaride (the site of Castel dell’Ovo in Naples), on the Bay of Naples, where the early Greek colonists discovered her corpse and arranged for a solemn burial on Pizzofalcone hill. (See the last three picture below.) Good day!

Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline norma427

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #171 on: July 05, 2013, 09:28:50 PM »
Dear Norma, I'd be glad to . . . The story of Sirens and Odysseus (or "Ulysses" in Italian) is a significant part of the history of Naples. Naples has two distinct histories that are sometimes not easy to distinguish from one another: (1) Neapolitan history according to the myths and (2) Neapolitan history according to historians. In Homer's epic poem "The Odyssey" (which is about the adventures of Odysseus on his voyage to home after the fall of Troy), he did not describe and name the Sirens. Many later authors identified them as beautiful, winged women who possessed seductive singing voices. Homer mentioned only two Sirens, but most later writers spoke of three. They lived on an island called Anthemöessa, near the Gulf of Naples. Although the name is no longer in usage, varying accounts ascribe Anthemöessa to either the island of Ischia (where the Ischia sourdough culture is from) or Capri in the Gulf of Naples. (See the first picture below.) Basically, when sailors sailed near the island, the Sirens' song would allure them, causing them to steer toward the rocks and sink upon impact with them.
 
As claimed by the legends, history of Naples begins when Parthenope (one of the Sirens) was drowned and washed ashore on the Bay of Naples. When Parthenope’s singing voice could not allure Odysseus (because he had himself tied to the mast and the ears of his men plugged with wax), she became distraught and threw herself into the sea. (See the 2nd picture hereunder.) Her corpse was washed up to the islet of Megaride (the site of Castel dell’Ovo in Naples), on the Bay of Naples, where the early Greek colonists discovered her corpse and arranged for a solemn burial on Pizzofalcone hill. (See the last three picture below.) Good day!

Omid

Omid,

Thank you so much for telling me about the story of Siren and Odysseus.  I recall you told Michelle, Bill and me that sometimes myths and history are hard to separate in understanding everything.  Thanks also for explaining Homer's epic poem “The Odyssey”.  I find all that you posted very interesting.  I never even knew where the Island of Ischia was before you posted that photo. 

I hope you can obtain that book you talked about. 

Norma 
Always working and looking for new information!

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #172 on: July 05, 2013, 09:36:38 PM »
Fascinating!  I'm quite familiar with the Homer's Odyssey and the story of the Sirens ("Go to sleep, little baby..."), but I had no idea that Naple's mythological history tied into it.

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #173 on: July 06, 2013, 05:29:31 AM »
Omid, you can see some of the differences here between the Ferrara M130 used at Bruno and the Acunto Mario Classico 5 that Craig has in the links below.

While the height/depth of the floor and foundation are almost the same on both ovens (13.7795" Acunto & 13.50" Ferrara), the oven door is significantly wider on the Ferrara oven, by just over three inches.

Acunto Mario Guide and Specifications:

http://media.wix.com/ugd//803c05_267bbcb591faf5cbcacaa2e7a13109ad.pdf

Stefano Ferrara Model 130 Specifications Sheet:

http://www.artisanpizzasolutions.com/PDF/130_SF_OvenSpecSheet_FINAL.pdf

It should be noted that Stefano Ferrara ovens are now different than the ones employed at many places (Bruno, Paulie Gee's Brooklyn, Nomad, etc.). The exterior shape and shelves for dinner plates are much different in the newer models (I prefer the look of the newer models).  I am not sure if they have made the floor and foundation on the newer Ferrara ovens deeper than the older models like those employed at Bruno.  However, it does appear that the same number of tile rows run from the base of the foundation to the iron door of the oven in both newer and older models. So the height/depth of the foundation and cooking floor appears to be the same.

Finally, if you look at page three of the Acunto user guide I linked to above, there is a shot of the dome which looks just like the photo of the dome in the refractory chamber of Craig's oven, as taken by Norma in picture 015.JPG in Reply #9 of this thread (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26074.msg263023.html#msg263023). The gaps between the bricks where the mortar is are mostly uniform in size and the bricks are closely fitted together.  For the most part, there appears to be some offsetting of the brick rows so that lines of mortar do not run in a straight(ish) line through too many rings/levels of bricks.

On the recent article on Slice about Motorino returning to Brooklyn, there was a shot of the dome of Palombino's new Stefano Ferrara oven (http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2013/06/interview-with-mathieu-palombino-at-motorino-williamsburg-brooklyn-slideshow.html#show-335105)

The mortar appears to have significantly seeped through the bricks in places, particularly near the dome and in the first ring of horizontally placed bricks that start on top of the vertical ring of bricks (the vertical bricks touch the cooking floor). It is difficult to tell if the fitting of the bricks is even and closely aligned, but obscured by the heavier amount of mortar....or if there are various sized cuts of bricks in some places that are not tightly fit together and mortar has been relied on to hold the oven together in those areas. I'm guessing it is the former and not the latter.

Probably not a big deal and I cannot wait to receive my Ferrara ovens, but at 2:47 at night the mind wanders at times. --K

Dear Pizzablogger, I thank you for the links.

You wrote, "I cannot wait to receive my Ferrara ovens. . . ." At the Summit, I heard the news about your new undertaking. Congratulations! You are going to be a busy man soon. Good day!

Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit 2
« Reply #174 on: July 08, 2013, 03:51:32 AM »
The way I understood Omid's comment about the floor height is that the SF floor is not actually as thick as it would appear in the spec sheet. He commented that if you look up from underneath, you will see that the floor thickness is actually several inches less than it would appear from the front elevation, stopping well before the bottom of the base. This is in contrast to the Acunto where the floor extends all the way to the bottom of the base. This would of course be an observation based on the oven at Bruno and may be different than the newer ovens as you noted. Omid can correct me if I'm wrong.

Dear Craig, you correctly understood me in reference to my assertion, "In contrast to the Ferrara at Bruno, Craig's Acunto appears to have a thicker floor and foundation (put together as one whole), at least by 2 to 3 inches." Yesterday, I measured the thickness of the floor and foundation (considered together as one whole) of the Ferrara oven at Pizzeria Bruno. The thickness of the oven floor and its foundation, together, measured exactly 10 inches, from the surface of the oven floor to the bottom of the foundation. (See the 1st picture below.) Some may wonder why I excluded the metal band, which encircles the bottom of the foundation, from my measurement. It is because the band is not part of the floor foundation, at least thermally speaking. (See the last two pictures.) Craig, could you, please, measure the thickness of your oven floor and its foundation together? I surmise that it is probably about 13 inches, I could be wrong though. I thank Peter, my boss, for letting me take pictures and measurements of his Ferrara. Good day!
« Last Edit: July 08, 2013, 04:07:57 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

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