Author Topic: Re: My NY Style Pizza And Dough Formulation  (Read 2878 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: My NY Style Pizza And Dough Formulation
« Reply #25 on: July 12, 2013, 09:37:24 AM »
philipmason,

When my memory fails me or my thinking gets muddled on the subject of fermentation, I always first turn to the subject matter at http://www.theartisan.net/The_Artisan_Yeast_Treatise_Section_Two.htm#Fermentation%20Control. It is my bible on the subject. If you go to the home page for theartisan.net, at http://www.theartisan.net/, you will find links to other facets of dough making that are also highly informative.

Peter


Offline philipmason

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Re: My NY Style Pizza And Dough Formulation
« Reply #26 on: July 12, 2013, 09:42:41 AM »
Thank you pizza god!!

Offline philipmason

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Re: My NY Style Pizza And Dough Formulation
« Reply #27 on: July 12, 2013, 09:52:01 AM »
Also, my reading indicates that fermentation above 80 F results in the yeast or bacteria making bad tasting by products.

Any experience in this?


I did a three day high oil cold ferment, with sourdough FLAVOR, and baked it last night. No taste difference, but it was good. Family devoured it, even through dough tore.

I have been using high oil/sugar, and looking at additives (malt, sourdough flavor, probiotics, sour cream, etc) None have worked so far.

My goal is to short cut really, get dough that tastes good in three hours or less. Thats why I have been doing high oil/sugar and looking at additives for taste to make up for a 3 hour ferment.

I now exposed myself, ha!

Offline mttfrog13

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Re: My NY Style Pizza And Dough Formulation
« Reply #28 on: July 12, 2013, 02:23:38 PM »
The sugar is coming from the enzymes in the flour itself breaking down into sugar. The flavor is coming from the yeast eating the sugar and creating byproducts. I think the cold fermentation is good because just like with brewing beer, you don't want your yeast to get out of control. Beer brewed at too high of a temp always has off flavors, but when ever you're brewing a smooth ale or lager, the temp would be lower.

It's very true that dough that has been cold fermented for more than a couple of days will be easier to tear. I don't think there would really be a solution to that rather than just being more careful with the dough.

If you're not interested in cold fermenting then your recipe is probably pretty good but I'd up the salt to at least 2%.

I've heard that oil can coat the flour and not allow the flour to properly hydrate and hinder gluten development. You might want to try hydrating the flour first in a poolish. I've never done it before so maybe someone can chime in. Wetter flour/yeast ferments faster and easier, which is why no knead recipes with hydrations around 70% require so little yeast. So basically you can get a lot more fermentation done that you normally would. If done too long, you could actually over ferment.

Mix your yeast, water, and enough flour to get you to 100% hydration. I think you'd want it to sit overnight in the fridge, but I think you can do shorter times at warmer temps. This will give the flour time to hydrate and also I believe it will add a lot of flavor to the dough. After the preferment, add your salt, oil, and start adding your remaining flour and kneading as you add the rest of your flour. Then just let it rise for an hour or two.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2013, 03:37:54 PM by mttfrog13 »