Author Topic: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.  (Read 1150 times)

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Offline Ogwoodfire

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To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« on: May 19, 2015, 08:09:56 PM »
I know there has been quite a bit of talk on this forum about the autolyse method and I'm not sure if someone has done it but u would like to conduct a trial and was hoping to set the parameters of the expirament. I was thinking something to the tune of 30 minute autolyse vs standard incorporation with 63% hydration 2% starter 3% salt with 24 hour bulk ferment than 24 hour balled. I will take feedback and conduct the expirament within the next 2 weeks (would do sooner but Iam in the process of moving). I think it will be interesting to see if this method has any effect if any on the final product. I have been using this process for years but have had good results with and without, but have never conducted a side by side comparison. Thoughts?


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2015, 08:20:54 PM »
Rather than to simply test a hypothesis that there is a difference between a dough that incorporates autolyse and an otherwise similar dough that does not, I think it would be much more interesting if you would define exactly what you think will be the differences and test that more detailed hypothesis.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Ogwoodfire

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2015, 12:42:08 AM »
Sure why not. I would suspect (if any) the differences will be in gluten development (supposedly autolyse produces more orderly gluten development) texture, and possibly color and crumb due to different levels of oxidation from kneeling.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2015, 08:50:54 AM »
I was thinking you should be even more specific than that and describe what you expect to experience in both pizzas - basically describe what you think it is doing for your pizza - describe the specific differences you expect in taste, texture, tenderness, oven spring, color, browning, leoparding, etc.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline David Esq.

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2015, 10:59:58 AM »
Also, include a double blind taste test with a statistically significant pool of subjects who will respond to questions regarding digestibility of the final product. It would be great to have a large enough pool of subjects to include those with and without known difficulties digesting wheat while being cognizant of the fact that those who suffer greatly from gluten intolerance ought to be compensated for their participation in the study.

Offline Ogwoodfire

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2015, 07:23:54 PM »
I have an event in July I can possibly test this with. I'm moving this week and have no access to my oven so it may have to wait a few weeks.

Offline Ogwoodfire

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2015, 07:25:20 PM »
I could create a scorecard where guest rated each of the mentioned categories by Craig.

Offline pizzaDIS

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2015, 09:01:13 AM »
Hey OFWoodFire, just curious if you still plan to do this testing.  I'm excited to see and try and understand these results especially the digestibility part.  Look forward to seeing your results.

Offline jim baugh

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2015, 10:38:04 AM »
I do autolyze most of the time. Started doing it with baguettes and noticed a difference. Mine is longer though, an hour to two hours. What this does is just help build the gluten strands and certainly you will also get proper hydration. We do not use a mixer, and is not required when doing autolyze and long ferments. (3-5 days).I think in the end, what separates one dough from another is all about the character and layerd depth flavor of the finished dough. Very small things add up to make a difference in the final dough product. Water, the type of flour, mix times, autolyze, Levain, etc, etc, all add up to make the final flavor profile.
So IMHO weather you autolyze or not probably depends on what you are trying to do. If you want to make a fast pie with just an overnight ferment. Then you can skip autolyze, mix the dough in a mixer or food processor, use commercial yeast, tap water and away you go. You will get a good Pie!
However if you are going for a more artisan, wider flavor profile that is unique in flavor and texture, then you probably do want to autolyse, filtered water, long ferment times, and use a sourdough culture for levain.
The end result we get with the dough is pretty amazing. The flavor is so good, you really don’t need anything else, just a little olive oil dip and your happy. Add sauce and cheese and WOW! LOL As a matter of fact, I use our pizza dough now for baguettes. They are super.
Don’t know if any of this helps, but please let us know how it turned out.
Workflow

Take starter our first day and re feed discard in a new bowl, set out at room temp for 24 hours. Feed twice during the time. Re feed mother jar also and put back in fridge. Once starter is ready the steps below is what we usually do.

•   First add water to large bowl
•   Next add the flour to your water
•   Mix with spoon until incorporated
•   Cover room temp and let site 1-2 hrs
•   Next we add our sourdough culture
•   Mix, this will be very hydrated, around 80 %
•   Cover and let stand another our
•   Add more flour and sea salt then bench it (sometimes a pinch of commercial yeast is added also)
•   Hand knead only a few minutes to get the consistency you want
•   Bulk ferment-usually we do four days (ball on the third day and put back in cold storage- take out room temp 2-4 hours before baking.

This is generally what we do. But yes I have used a blender, and yes have also made overnight rise, and yes I even will make chef boy r dee in a pinch. So, we try to cover all basis but if planning a pie night, we will take the steps above inorder to create a very special and delicious dough.
I just learned last night how to make home made Motz, let me tell ya, I was shocked that it turned out and turned out great. What a revelation. Fun stuff

Godspeed
JB
Jim Baugh
Jim Baugh Outdoors TV


Offline Ogwoodfire

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2015, 07:57:54 AM »
Yes I will get to this at some point just for fun. I make dough nearly everyday but it's such large batches iand it's for my business I don't want mess around with test. When things slow down here in the fall I will have plenty of time on my hands to do is.

Offline Ouroboros

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2015, 11:52:37 PM »
Hi Ogwoodfire, I was also wondering whether you ended doing the test or not. I'd be curious to see what non-pizza makers think of the difference! In other words, unbiased and hungry tasters  :)
Please do let us know.

SLG
"The Earth is the cradle of humanity, but mankind cannot stay in the cradle forever."

Offline Ogwoodfire

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2015, 10:25:08 AM »
I will but it's not going to happen for a while. The food truck has really taken off and I'm pretty much booked for the next couple of months. Once things slow down in the fall I will have plenty of time on my hands to work on recipes and such.


 

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