Author Topic: Neapolitan dough help  (Read 3117 times)

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Offline hodgey1

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Re: Neapolitan dough help
« Reply #100 on: September 07, 2014, 04:39:10 PM »
My maiden voyage into NP was a bit of a disappointment. First pie nearly a complete failure when pie wouldn't come off peel. The sauce was almost the consistency of water and soaked quickly threw thin dough which then made it nearly impossible to launch. I've launched wet NY dough for years but this is a different animal. I had to resort to lifting it with spatulas and getting some semolina underneath. So first pie a bit misshapen but tasted OK. Second pie went way better once I stretched the dough i hit it in the bench flour again then putt on my peel. once on the peel i worked quickly as to not let it sit long on peel, this one launched much better.

beside launch issue I have the following concerns that i would love feed back on.

1: Sauce was one can Cento whole peeled run threw coarse food mill, it was like water, is that the way its supposed to be? Should have I drained liquid prior to milling? I've never eaten a Neapolitan pizza, not even a poor example so besides pictures i don't have much to go on.

2: I did not achieve much oven spring, it was a bit doughy. cooked on 770* F deck with 950* F ceiling with highly active live fire, they were finished  around 1min 45 sec. I used 4% stater and no yeast, i posted a pic showing dough after 22hrs at 68*F. I then put it in Refridge and removed 1 1/2 hrs prior to launch. Did I maybe not let it rise enough? Stater issues? I'll post pics of pie two.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2014, 08:50:31 PM by hodgey1 »


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Neapolitan dough help
« Reply #101 on: September 07, 2014, 04:43:43 PM »
The sauce should be pretty wet. You can always strain it a bit through a fine sieve, but save what you strain in case you strain too much and need to add some back. If the sauce soaked through the dough, I suspect it was a matter of the dough being pulled too thin rather than sauce being to watery.

770F is probably at the lower limits of a NP bake. I'd shoot for at least 800.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline theppgcowboy

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Re: Neapolitan dough help
« Reply #102 on: September 07, 2014, 06:20:04 PM »
Your dough is probably a little under developed. Bump up the temp. What does the bottom look like?
« Last Edit: September 07, 2014, 06:21:48 PM by theppgcowboy »

Offline hodgey1

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Re: Neapolitan dough help
« Reply #103 on: September 07, 2014, 08:42:53 PM »
Here's a pic of the bottom and one of pre-bake

Offline theppgcowboy

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Re: Neapolitan dough help
« Reply #104 on: September 07, 2014, 08:56:43 PM »
Both look fine, any evoo?  More heat.  Make sure you get the oven sauturated.  How long did you fire the oven?

Offline hodgey1

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Re: Neapolitan dough help
« Reply #105 on: September 07, 2014, 09:21:53 PM »
I did forget the EVOO.. I preheated 3 1/2- 4 hrs

Offline hodgey1

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Re: Neapolitan dough help
« Reply #106 on: September 08, 2014, 07:57:45 AM »
I think what I'm going to do this coming weekend is retry NP and use IDY to get my feet wet. I'm thinking the lack of oven spring had to be due to the starter being a bit weak? I left my normal amount of dough for a nice puffy cornicione, but it ended very under inflated and doughy. I need someone to email me a perfect example of NP to see, smell and taste.  ;D

Offline theppgcowboy

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Re: Neapolitan dough help
« Reply #107 on: September 08, 2014, 08:05:18 AM »
Let them proof more.


 

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