Author Topic: gas fired oven, 550 degrees F, 250 to 300 degrees C. 00 flour! help  (Read 688 times)

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Offline PizzaVera

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Hello
so in the restaurant we are cooking in a gas dome oven at about 550F around 300C degrees
using 5stagione 00 flour.

I feel the dough is coming out a little cracker like, slightly hard crust, not puffy crust, cornicione.
I have tried cooking it less, sure it comes out softer but still the crust is not puffy and still has that cracker crust feel.

what could be the problem?

im guessing the oven temp is not hot enough for 00?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: gas fired oven, 550 degrees F, 250 to 300 degrees C. 00 flour! help
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2014, 06:05:41 PM »
That's almost certainly the wrong flour to use. Like you guessed, it's not hot enough. You need 800F+ for that flour. You are probably cooking it longer than you need to because it's difficult to brown at lower temps. This is making it dry and hard. Notwithstanding, you should still get some decent puff if your dough is suitably hydrated and you are baking on a stone with reasonably high conductivity. Puffy does not mean soft though. You can get puffy at that temp, but it's probably not going to be soft like NP and certainly won't have the same coloration.
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline theppgcowboy

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Re: gas fired oven, 550 degrees F, 250 to 300 degrees C. 00 flour! help
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2014, 08:43:14 PM »
You are swimming upstream with this combination.  I have found that my neo doughs with 00 flour cooked at a lower temp are tough and blond.  I would look at high gluten flour for the temps you are working at.

Offline PizzaVera

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Re: gas fired oven, 550 degrees F, 250 to 300 degrees C. 00 flour! help
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2014, 06:17:14 AM »
I made some nice pies tonights
puffy crust. Soft chewy
cornicione. A 24 hour rise

Here is a pic of a pie i made the other day
not so good..

Offline PizzaVera

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Re: gas fired oven, 550 degrees F, 250 to 300 degrees C. 00 flour! help
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2015, 08:42:26 AM »
That's almost certainly the wrong flour to use. Like you guessed, it's not hot enough. You need 800F+ for that flour. You are probably cooking it longer than you need to because it's difficult to brown at lower temps. This is making it dry and hard. Notwithstanding, you should still get some decent puff if your dough is suitably hydrated and you are baking on a stone with reasonably high conductivity. Puffy does not mean soft though. You can get puffy at that temp, but it's probably not going to be soft like NP and certainly won't have the same coloration.

I have tried turning up the oven to 450-500 C  but the pizza burns on the bottom right away.
im surprised here, so we just keep the oven at 300 C to insure we are serving decent pizzas for customers.

any ideas why the bottom of the pies are burning at 400? logically I can assume the floor is too hot? but doesn't make sense when woodfired ovens are at 400 - 500 C easy and not burning the bottoms..


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: gas fired oven, 550 degrees F, 250 to 300 degrees C. 00 flour! help
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2015, 09:32:48 AM »
I have tried turning up the oven to 450-500 C  but the pizza burns on the bottom right away.
im surprised here, so we just keep the oven at 300 C to insure we are serving decent pizzas for customers.

any ideas why the bottom of the pies are burning at 400? logically I can assume the floor is too hot? but doesn't make sense when woodfired ovens are at 400 - 500 C easy and not burning the bottoms..

Different materials have different thermal conductivity. The more conductive the deck, the faster it will burn the bottom, all other things equal. The higher the temperature of the oven, the lower the conductivity you need in the floor. Unfortunately there isn't a good one-size-fits-all material. If the conductivity is right at 500F, it will be too high at 900F.

Even in wood fired ovens, the conductivity varies quite a bit. The Neapolitan wood fired ovens, which are specifically designed to run at very high temperatures,  typically have floors made from biscotto di sorrento which has very low conductivity. Some wood fire ovens have floors made from fire brick that is more conductive than the biscotto and makes it more difficult to bake at high temps. One member here built an oven with a fire brick floor, decided it was too conductive, and put another floor on top of the firebrick with lower conductivity.

It sounds like your deck is made from something too conductive for high temperatures. One thing you could try at high temperature is to slide a pizza screen under the pizza after the bottom gets close to being done. This should stop it from burning while the top of the pizza finished baking.
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline SAUZER.ITALY

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Re: gas fired oven, 550 degrees F, 250 to 300 degrees C. 00 flour! help
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2015, 09:40:32 AM »
Different materials have different thermal conductivity. The more conductive the deck, the faster it will burn the bottom, all other things equal. The higher the temperature of the oven, the lower the conductivity you need in the floor. Unfortunately there isn't a good one-size-fits-all material. If the conductivity is right at 500F, it will be too high at 900F.

Even in wood fired ovens, the conductivity varies quite a bit. The Neapolitan wood fired ovens, which are specifically designed to run at very high temperatures,  typically have floors made from biscotto di sorrento which has very low conductivity. Some wood fire ovens have floors made from fire brick that is more conductive than the biscotto and makes it more difficult to bake at high temps. One member here built an oven with a fire brick floor, decided it was too conductive, and put another floor on top of the firebrick with lower conductivity.

It sounds like your deck is made from something too conductive for high temperatures. One thing you could try at high temperature is to slide a pizza screen under the pizza after the bottom gets close to being done. This should stop it from burning while the top of the pizza finished baking.


Good ..I like your answer  :pizza:


 

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