Author Topic: The Blackstone Challenge  (Read 33544 times)

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Offline trosenberg

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #150 on: August 03, 2013, 08:42:29 PM »
Chau that looks world class.  What the heck am I doing messing with WFOs, Ishia starters and 48 hour room temp dough when you make it happen with a $350 oven in 6 hours. 
Trosenberg


Offline pizza dr

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #151 on: August 04, 2013, 10:31:40 AM »
 ^^^

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #152 on: August 04, 2013, 11:42:48 AM »
That leoparding is looking a lot more Craig-ish.  If you continue at this rate, I think you'll be breaking the Craig barrier in a matter of weeks, not months.


Breaking?

The pies are looking great Chau. Notwithstanding, I think you guys are going to need to figure out how to get the spots a few shades darker while, at the same time, melting the cheese less, before there is too much discussion of "breaking." Last time I checked, a leopard's spots are black not brown.  ;D
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #153 on: August 04, 2013, 01:29:37 PM »
Thank you for the words of encouragement fellow members.  Craig, I am acutely aware of the challenge I set before myself.   If I can make a pie that has the textural qualities I am looking for and also looks like it came from a wfo, then I will be satisfied.  Even if it doesn't look exactly like one of your pies.  So far, I am not there yet, but will keep trying. 

One of my biggest issues right now is working with old flour that has been dessicated by this arid climate I live in.  I need to find some fresh flour and find a way of preserving it until I need it. 

Chau   


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #154 on: August 04, 2013, 02:52:41 PM »
My comment was in regards to Scott's bold prediction not the challenge you've set for yourself.
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Offline f.montoya

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #155 on: August 09, 2013, 10:02:36 AM »
One of my biggest issues right now is working with old flour that has been dessicated by this arid climate I live in.  I need to find some fresh flour and find a way of preserving it until I need it. 

Double up two large plastic garbage bags.

I know. Sounds bad. But I live in a climate that is the polar opposite of yours. Humidity is off the charts here in Japan during the summer. So I put my 25KG bag of Caputo inside a 45 liter garbage bag, tied it closed. Then I put the entire thing inside another 45 liter garbage bag and tied it closed. I keep it in a dark place, which is my pantry under my staircase, and it has done superbly well so far. Air conditioning runs only between 11am and 11pm, so the other 12 hours is warmer and humid. I would think that whatever moisture that was already in the flour at the time your bag arrived, would be well protected and preserved with the same method. I also only make dough when the AC is on.

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #156 on: August 09, 2013, 10:16:33 AM »
Thank you Fidel for the suggestion.  I did something similar yesterday.  It's amazing what humidity or lack of it will do to flour and how it reacts and bakes up.  I've been having such poor results lately, that I realized my flour is more than a year old.  I just can't bake enough pizzas for 2 to stay ahead of the desert climate.  I bought a new 50lb bag of flour yesterday and noticed the difference right away.  I divided the flour up into 4lb bags using gallon size ziplock bags.  I pushed all the air out, sealed it, and packed it into a mini fridge (40F).  I also left an open bottle of water with the water level marked.   I suspect and moisture that is lost with me opening the fridge occassionally will be replaced by the bottle water.  We will see what happens over time, but I hope this is a good fix for that. 

Chau
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 10:19:15 AM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #157 on: August 09, 2013, 10:19:29 AM »
Here ya go Chau.  :)   http://www.bearicuda.com/critter-can/bear_proof_trash_container.php

Perfect idea Fidel. Garbage can liners are made to keep the smell in so imagine it would work well for Chau's moisture problem. Some sort of snap lock closure thingy would be good for that set-up.


And here are some brainiacs that say to put a lettuce leaf in the container.  ;D
http://www.420magazine.com/forums/how-grow-marijuana/71995-how-do-i-re-moisten-dry-buds.html
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 10:25:38 AM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #158 on: August 09, 2013, 10:22:12 AM »
I was using a 25 gallon airtight storage container from Costco for my caputo flour.  But accessing it periodically and occassionally forgetting to shut it tight has allowed the dry air to wick all the moisture out.   I hate to be wasteful, but I think I need to pitch out the remainder of my flour and buy some fresh stuff. 


Offline f.montoya

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #159 on: August 09, 2013, 10:27:27 AM »
I was using a 25 gallon airtight storage container from Costco for my caputo flour.  But accessing it periodically and occassionally forgetting to shut it tight has allowed the dry air to wick all the moisture out.   I hate to be wasteful, but I think I need to pitch out the remainder of my flour and buy some fresh stuff.

You might also try dividing up your large bags into smaller portioned, double-sealed zip-loc bags. For example, you can buy a 25kg bag of whatever flour, and immediately portion it and bag into 25, 1kg bags, that are ready for quick use. You could even go smaller if you're not one for making a lot of pies at once. They should keep just fine, no matter what the climate.

EDIT: Just re-read your post. Looks like you have a good plan. Hopefully that works well for you!
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 10:29:37 AM by f.montoya »

scott123

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #160 on: August 09, 2013, 10:29:27 AM »
I pushed all the air out, sealed it, and packed it into a mini fridge (40F).  I also left an open bottle of water with the water level marked.   I suspect and moisture that is lost with me opening the fridge occassionally will be replaced by the bottle water.  We will see what happens over time, but I hope this is a good fix for that.

Chau, refrigerators, with or without open bottles of water, dry food out.  Plastic is air permeable, and the thinner the plastic the more air permeability you encounter.  It won't keep your flour moist forever, but if you want to prolong the moisture in your flour the longest, my suggestion would be to pack it in glass jars with metal lids that have rubber seals.  Thicker plastic is the next best solution, such as the plastic buckets with air tight lids one can usually get for free from bakery departments in supermarkets.

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #161 on: August 09, 2013, 10:32:30 AM »
Yes good idea Fidel.  No 25lb bag of caputo available here.  Just the 50 pounder and I feel a bit lucky to even get that.  I can find the little small 1 kg bags of caputo chef's flour but the cost is prohibitive. 

But what I may do is portion out a 50lb bag of caputo into ziplock bags and push all the air out, then stack them into the big 25 gallon storage container.  I may also put a moist sponge in there and moisten it occassionally.  That will let me know just how airtight that sucker really is. 
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 01:12:13 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #162 on: August 09, 2013, 10:33:37 AM »
Thank you Scott, I will start hitting up the bakeries. 

scott123

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #163 on: August 09, 2013, 10:41:38 AM »
That will let me know just how airtight that sucker really is.

If it's 25 gallon, I don't think it's airtight at all.

Thank you Scott, I will start hitting up the bakeries.

One other advantage of the bakery containers is that, instead of one huge container that exposes all the flour when you open it, you can break up the bag into multiple containers.  If I aggressively vibrate the container to get the flour to settle, I can squeeze a 50# bag into two 4.25 gallon covered buckets, but, in your case, you might want to go with 3 containers.

Btw, every supermarket department uses these plastic buckets.  I think the best department to ask is the bakery, as they go through the most of them (icing, glazes, etc.) and the ingredients don't have an odor that permeates the plastic like the pickles at the deli or the seafood buckets.  When you ask for your bucket, offer to wash it yourself, since the buckets waiting to be recycled will all be covered with some kind of sweet goo- and they'll be more inclined to give you one if they don't have to wash it first.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 10:49:00 AM by scott123 »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #164 on: August 09, 2013, 10:50:24 AM »
When you ask for your bucket, offer to wash it yourself, since the buckets waiting to be recycled will all be covered with some kind of sweet goo-
Brilliant!  :drool:
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Offline norma427

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #165 on: August 09, 2013, 10:52:44 AM »
These are the buckets I used to store flour in if the flour was from a large bag.  My buckets had oil or corn syrup in them before.

Norma

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #166 on: August 09, 2013, 11:00:40 AM »
And these are really airtight?  The dryness here is pervasive!
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 11:24:48 AM by Jackie Tran »


Offline redox

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #167 on: August 09, 2013, 11:12:06 AM »
We used to get various chemicals and resins that could not dry out. They were inside a plastic bag fastened with a twist tie and sealed inside the bucket. I can't imagine that you'd have a problem with flour if you did it that way.

Offline redox

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #168 on: August 09, 2013, 11:14:07 AM »
We used to get various chemicals and resins that could not dry out. They were inside a plastic bag fastened with a twist tie and sealed inside the bucket. I can't imagine that you'd have a problem with flour if you did it that way.
You could even leave a moist sponge outside the plastic bag but inside the bucket to keep the air from getting too dry.
Oops, meant to hit the modify button instead of quoting myself. What am I, Hollywood?

Offline norma427

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #169 on: August 09, 2013, 11:14:22 AM »
And these are really airtight?  The dryness here is is pervasive!

Chau,

There is a rubber ring inside the top lid.  At least I think that keeps it somewhat airtight.  The other container I have is a step up from the plastic buckets, but is much more expensive.  Don't mind my messy shed though, that is the next thing on my agenda to get cleaned up.  Too much pizza forum for me.  :-D

Norma
 

Offline parallei

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #170 on: August 09, 2013, 11:18:32 AM »
Yes good idea Fidel.  No 25lb bag of caputo available here.  Just the 50 pounder and I feel a bit lucky to even get that.  I can find the little small 1 kg? bags caputo chef's flour but the cost is prohibitive. 

But what I may do is portion out a 50lb bag of caputo into ziplock bags and push all the air out, then stack them into the big 25 gallon storage container.  I may also put a moist sponge in there and moisten it occassionally.  That will let me know just how airtight that sucker really is.

It's pretty dry here in Denver also, though not this week........

I've had luck busting large quantities into sturdy one gallon zip locks (5 lbs each) and putting them into the freezer.  I'm probably not as persnickety about it as some!  I should probably become more so. ;D

scott123

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #171 on: August 09, 2013, 11:41:26 AM »
At least I think that keeps it somewhat airtight.

The O ring keeps it airtight.  Occasionally I've seen this O ring get nicked by box cutters, but, as long as the O ring is intact and the top is all the way down (I press down with all my weight all the way around the edge), it's air tight.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #172 on: August 09, 2013, 11:54:29 AM »
I may also put a moist sponge in there and moisten it occassionally.

Those little plastic things you fill with water and use to keep a cigar humidor at the right humidity might be a good choice.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 11:57:10 AM by TXCraig1 »
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #173 on: August 09, 2013, 12:05:07 PM »
They also make these little clay bears for brown sugar at $5 a pop.  I might invest in some of those as well.  I just need a little humidity in there to off set the air that's trapped in there.   OK no more excuses for me, time to start getting serious about my pizza making!

Offline pizza dr

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Re: The Blackstone Challenge
« Reply #174 on: August 09, 2013, 01:01:29 PM »
Hey Chau

I stopped buying those 50 lb bags long ago... most of it went to waste.  I now buy the 20lb re-packs off of Amazon.  Its from Brickovenbaker and I've never had an old bag yet.  I wait until Amazon has a free shipping deal and it makes it worth it.  I keep it wrapped tightly in the bag its sent with placed in a 25 gallon bucket...  so far I've had no problems with this as I use up the flour way before it goes bad or dries out. 

Scot


 

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