Author Topic: Pizza post bake  (Read 171 times)

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Offline pythonic

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Pizza post bake
« on: Yesterday at 11:54:06 AM »
I'm wondering what everyone does with their pizza post bake and what gives the best results on the bottom.

1.  Cool on screen so bottom doesn't get soggy (how long?)
2.  Cut quickly and put on a non steamy surface (paper plate/cardboard)
3.  Bake longer and out directly onto cutter pan.

I am trying to achieve a bottom crust that cracks more upon folding and isn't very chewy.  Do I need to bake longer, cool longer or use lower hydration?

Nate
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Pizza post bake
« Reply #1 on: Yesterday at 12:32:26 PM »
Nate;
Believe it or not, adding more water to the dough will actually provide for a crispier finished crust if that is what you are looking for. You best post baking results will probably be had by placing the pizza onto a screen immediately upon removal from the oven. This will allow the pizza to steam off, then transfer to a cutting block (I don't like cutting pans since a cold metal pan and a hot pizza = condensation. Even corrugated cardboard pizza circles make for a pretty good cutting surface, once cut, place onto a heated plate (remember condensation) or my personal favorite is a wicker plate basket with a paper plate. The paper plate is not conducive to forming condensation, it helps to insulate the slice thus keeping it hot longer than a metal serving tray would, and clean up is a snap.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline pythonic

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Re: Pizza post bake
« Reply #2 on: Yesterday at 02:23:48 PM »
Nate;
Believe it or not, adding more water to the dough will actually provide for a crispier finished crust if that is what you are looking for. You best post baking results will probably be had by placing the pizza onto a screen immediately upon removal from the oven. This will allow the pizza to steam off, then transfer to a cutting block (I don't like cutting pans since a cold metal pan and a hot pizza = condensation. Even corrugated cardboard pizza circles make for a pretty good cutting surface, once cut, place onto a heated plate (remember condensation) or my personal favorite is a wicker plate basket with a paper plate. The paper plate is not conducive to forming condensation, it helps to insulate the slice thus keeping it hot longer than a metal serving tray would, and clean up is a snap.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom,

Will more water in the dough get me cracking on the undercarriage?  Do I need to bake it longer since there is more hydration too?  Or do I need to use a lower gluten dough other than AT?

Nate
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 02:29:03 PM by pythonic »
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Pizza post bake
« Reply #3 on: Today at 08:09:11 AM »
Nate;
More water (higher dough absorption) will, within reason, actually allow the crust to bake faster, and the more open crumb structure will create a better thermal break between the deck and the toppings resulting in a crispier bottom crust characteristic. If you want to have a crust that is softer and more leathery you might try forming the pizza skin with the used of a rolling pin. Use of the pin will to a greater extent, degas the dough, reducing the effectiveness of the thermal break and allow more heat to pass through the bottom crust where it will be dissipated as steam when it reaches the sauce and toppings which are all roughly 90% water. This results in a more dense bottom crust that is not baked out as well, and it has a thinner actual crust formed on it which begins to absorb moisture from the more moist inner crumb portion of the crust very quickly after baking resulting in a tough, leathery eating characteristic. As for cracking of the crust, this is more common with a lower absorption dough. I don't think changing to an A.P. flour will help, but if you want to have a softer internal crumb structure and more flexible crust characteristic I would suggest increasing the fat/oil content of the dough to something it the range of 4 to 6% of the total flour weight.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline PizzaGarage

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Re: Pizza post bake
« Reply #4 on: Today at 04:34:09 PM »
To make crusts like that I use between 41% and 43% hydration and low oil 1.5%.  Bake on preheated stone at 475.  I place the pizza on an aluminum screen right from the oven for a 2-3 min cool down.  Then I place on ripple sheets and cut.  For me KAAP works best, can also mix in 10% semolina for a crispy and more "tender" chew.  Mix for 1 minute no oil low speed, then add oil, then mix for 6-7 more min on second speed..  Works great for me.


 

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