Author Topic: tossing to the limit  (Read 295 times)

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Offline waltertore

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tossing to the limit
« on: Yesterday at 10:44:49 AM »
Yesterday I learned from Tom Lehman that infusing fresh garlic into olive oil can be toxic.  Man, I have been doing this for decades and never knew.  So today we had 20 dough balls made with that oil so I decided to toss them to the limit.  It was  a lot of fun seeing how big I could get them.  The kids loved it as much as I did. These are 20oz, 3 day old balls that went waaaaaaaaaaaay past the 20" peel size.  The one where I am holding the stretched dough is about 3 feet across.  Walter

I just viewed them and don't know how to turn them around.  Peter did a great job for me once on this - are you out there Peter?
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 08:39:21 PM by waltertore »


Online David Esq.

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Re: tossing to the limit
« Reply #1 on: Yesterday at 10:57:16 AM »
Looks like a load of fun!

The FDA recommends that if you want to make your own infused garlic oil, you should prepare it fresh and use it right away. If you are saving any leftovers, you must refrigerate it right away and use within a week.
From the University of Maine:

Best Home Method: Flavored or Infused Oils from Dried Spices

Using dried garlic and/or herbs is the safest way to make infused oils without acidifying the product. Fresh herbs introduce water into the oil, and dangerous bacteria need water to grow. Dried herbs and garlic add no water to the oil, so bacteria cant grow.

Select a good-quality olive or other vegetable oil. Add your flavor additives to a clean container. Heat the oil to 180F in a pot. Pour the oil over the dried additives, cap your container, and cool.

If you decide to flavor oil with fresh garlic, vegetables, or herbs, use a pH meter. Begin by selecting a good quality olive or other vegetable oil. Thoroughly wash and dry the fresh flavoring ingredients. Garlic should be finely chopped or crushed. Add the cleaned ingredients to a clean container.

Choose a vinegar with four to five percent acidity. In a pot, heat vinegar to near boiling (190F). Pour the hot vinegar over the infusion ingredients, cover, and cool. Once the mixture has reached room temperature, add your oil and replace the cover.

You need enough vinegar so that the finished product has a pH of 4.6 or lower. This will keep C. bot from growing. Test the pH with a pH meter for food safety.

Storage

Although we do not advise making oil infusions with fresh additives at home, refrigerating this kind of oil infusion immediately after preparation will reduce your risk. Refrigeration will slow bacteria growth. Refrigeration will also slow the process by which oils go rancid. After one month, the number of bacteria in the product can become a food-safety hazard and it should be thrown away.

Acidified garlic, vegetables, and/or herbs in oil should be refrigerated. Do not store for more than one month. After one month, throw away any unused oil.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: tossing to the limit
« Reply #2 on: Yesterday at 11:01:47 AM »
Hey, Walter, what's with the hole? :-D

Peter

Offline waltertore

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Re: tossing to the limit
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 11:08:08 AM »
Looks like a load of fun!

The FDA recommends that if you want to make your own infused garlic oil, you should prepare it fresh and use it right away. If you are saving any leftovers, you must refrigerate it right away and use within a week.
From the University of Maine:

Best Home Method: Flavored or Infused Oils from Dried Spices

Using dried garlic and/or herbs is the safest way to make infused oils without acidifying the product. Fresh herbs introduce water into the oil, and dangerous bacteria need water to grow. Dried herbs and garlic add no water to the oil, so bacteria cant grow.

Select a good-quality olive or other vegetable oil. Add your flavor additives to a clean container. Heat the oil to 180F in a pot. Pour the oil over the dried additives, cap your container, and cool.

If you decide to flavor oil with fresh garlic, vegetables, or herbs, use a pH meter. Begin by selecting a good quality olive or other vegetable oil. Thoroughly wash and dry the fresh flavoring ingredients. Garlic should be finely chopped or crushed. Add the cleaned ingredients to a clean container.

Choose a vinegar with four to five percent acidity. In a pot, heat vinegar to near boiling (190F). Pour the hot vinegar over the infusion ingredients, cover, and cool. Once the mixture has reached room temperature, add your oil and replace the cover.

You need enough vinegar so that the finished product has a pH of 4.6 or lower. This will keep C. bot from growing. Test the pH with a pH meter for food safety.

Storage

Although we do not advise making oil infusions with fresh additives at home, refrigerating this kind of oil infusion immediately after preparation will reduce your risk. Refrigeration will slow bacteria growth. Refrigeration will also slow the process by which oils go rancid. After one month, the number of bacteria in the product can become a food-safety hazard and it should be thrown away.

Acidified garlic, vegetables, and/or herbs in oil should be refrigerated. Do not store for more than one month. After one month, throw away any unused oil.

thanks David.   Tom told me to use it same day or toss it.  I had been refrigerating it for a few days but decided to pitch the dough and oil even though it was only a couple days in the fridge. 

Offline waltertore

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Re: tossing to the limit
« Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 11:08:49 AM »
Hey, Walter, what's with the hole? :-D

Peter

Thanks Peter!  I kept tossing the dough till  you could drive a truck through it.  It was fun seeing how big it could go.  Walter

Online bigMoose

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Re: tossing to the limit
« Reply #5 on: Yesterday at 12:59:08 PM »
Is this warning something we need to heed on heat processed infusions like Calabrian chili oil?

Online David Esq.

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Re: tossing to the limit
« Reply #6 on: Yesterday at 03:26:45 PM »
Is this warning something we need to heed on heat processed infusions like Calabrian chili oil?
http://umaine.edu/publications/4385e/

Read it and see if it applies to however you are making your chili infused oil.

Offline waltertore

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Re: tossing to the limit
« Reply #7 on: Yesterday at 08:38:23 PM »
Peter:  I remember you telling me about the paint program.  I have a new laptop and it has it.  I fooled around with it and was able to enlarge the original photos.  My assistant Renee took the pictures on her phone camera and for some reason they come out small.  Paint enlarges them nicely. Thanks for that info!  Walter

Online Pete-zza

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Re: tossing to the limit
« Reply #8 on: Yesterday at 09:19:08 PM »
Walter,

Paint doesn't always work to enlarge certain photos, as I discovered recently when a member asked me to rotate his misoriented photos. I was able to rotate them and thought that enlarging them would help but it didn't work.

Peter


 

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