Author Topic: Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)  (Read 1551 times)

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Offline mjar

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Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)
« on: July 16, 2013, 02:15:56 AM »
Currently I am living in sydney and I have began a fasination with pizza's since I came here, much to the point where I think I will eventually open up a pizza shop when I return home to Ireland.

I was intrigued to see that they use pan/disks when they cook their pies.  I like to be able to use the pan as i think it is more practical in processing pies quicker.   I also came to terms that I prefer a thin based pizza but not to the point thats its a cracker.

Anyway, the question I would like to ask.  What type of oven would best suit pizzas baked on pans?  Do these ovens a variable temperatures for the top and bottom of the oven?? Would I be correct in saying that the bottom of the oven would have to be hotter given that the heat would have to conduct through the pan before browning the bottom of the pizza.
Michael R


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2013, 07:33:45 AM »
Michael,

As you can see from Reply 13 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26165.msg264544.html#msg264544 , there are many options available to pizza operators in the U.S. who want to use pans to make their pizzas. Whether the same options are available to you in Ireland is a question that will have to be addressed.

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2013, 08:02:28 AM »
Michael;
I've written a lot about pizza ovens and how to choose the one best suited to your specific needs for Pizza Marketing Quarterly <www.pmq.com>. You should be able to find it in the archived articles I've written. A lot goes into selecting the correct pizza oven: type of pizza(s), volume needed, speed of bake desired/needed, closed/open kitchen, store concept, space available are to name but a few. These are all addressed in my most recent article on choosing the right pizza oven.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2013, 08:36:43 AM »
I am not sure what specific PMQ articles on ovens that Tom has in mind, apart from Think Tank posts, of which there are many on the subject of ovens, but after a search this is the article I found:

http://www.pmq.com/Summer-2001/PMQs-Oven-Review/

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2013, 09:23:02 AM »
Peter;
In 2009 I wrote an article that was published in my column (In Lehmann's Terms) titled "Important Considerations When Considering an Oven For Your Pizzeria". This is a good read for anyone just getting into the pizza business and trying to figure out what oven is the best choice for their store concept. I was provoked into writing this article after seeing all too many start ups struggling with the wrong oven for their pizza type or store concept, and then needing to back away from their present oven only to go out and purchase yet another oven. The pizza that broke the camel's back was a pizzeria in Nebraska that I was called to to address a soggy pizza problem that was driving business away. Turns out their concept was one of "more toppings makes for a better pizza". Agree or disagree, that was their concept. The ovens they were using were conventional deck ovens (no significant airflow) so there was no way to remove all of the moisture being released from the vegetable toppings as they were cooked. I called in Middleby Marshall with their traveling display ovens (tractor-trailer with various ovens used for on-site demonstrations) and with their air impingement oven of the time they were able to drive enough water from the pizza during baking that the pizza was no longer soggy and the store was able to retain their original concept. The kicker: The individual owning the store had to abandon his three exhisting deck ovens and purchase a double stack wide body air impingement oven, effectively doubling his oven cost within his first year of operation. Bummer!
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Re: Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2013, 09:54:44 AM »
It took me a while to go through the PMQ magazine archives for 2009 but I finally found the article in the September 2009 issue, at http://www.pmq.com/Digital-Archives/digital/200909/, at page 18.

Peter

Offline mjar

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Re: Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2013, 09:40:06 PM »
Cheers Lads for the information that you have supplied.  I have been doing alot of reading on these forums but I dont write too much because I'm a newbie and just trying to learn as much as I can.  Currently I am using a portable pizza oven while experiementing with different mixtures and it has helped alot.

I love the idea of the conveyor and I have found that I buy my favourite pizza's in Sydney that use these conveyor types.  I see that they use the pans aswell but I am trying to find out what the best type of material is used when selecting a good pan, that will give you a nice crust to the bottom.  I am aware that the base needs to be really thin to achieve any sort of crispy texture but I would love to know the science behind the speed at which the pan is heated when entering the conveyor.  Anyways, I will look at the links that both of you have supplied.  Thank you very much for the quick responses and taking interest in my questions?
Michael R

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2013, 02:19:43 PM »
Michael;
A good quality anodized, black colored pan or baking disk will probably serve you just fine. Optional, and recommended, is a nonstick finish. You can see pans of this type at Lloyd Pans <www.lloydpans.com>. Some of their pans and disks are to some extent product specific, meaning that they were designed to provide a superior bake to a specific type of pizza. For example, their cloud pattern, Hearth Bake Disks are designed specifically for use with the newer air impingement ovens operating at temperatures of 475F and higher using dough formulas devoid of any browning agents, such as sugar, milk or eggs. The Hex Disk is well suited to making a Domino's type of pizza as well as use in reheating certain types of pizza slices. This company also has a bunch of neat gadgets specific to the pizza industry. Take a look at their offerings. The Lloyd pans and disks are about as close to "bullet proof" as one can get.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline mjar

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Re: Commercial Pizza Oven (thin based)
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2013, 09:49:23 PM »
I called in Middleby Marshall with their traveling display ovens (tractor-trailer with various ovens used for on-site demonstrations) and with their air impingement oven of the time they were able to drive enough water from the pizza during baking that the pizza was no longer soggy and the store was able to retain their original concept.

This comment excites me and kind of weird.  As I was passing one of my favourite pizza parlours I was able to have a look to see what type of Oven they use and it was a Middleby Marshall conveyor type oven.  They put so many topings on the pizza and thats why I love it.  The fact that the toppings get cooked really well and the cheese and sauce is protected from browning gives a kind juicy bite to the cheese which stretches as you pull away.  I just love it!!

A good quality anodized, black colored pan or baking disk will probably serve you just fine. Optional, and recommended, is a nonstick finish. You can see pans of this type at Lloyd Pans <www.lloydpans.com>. Some of their pans and disks are to some extent product specific, meaning that they were designed to provide a superior bake to a specific type of pizza. For example, their cloud pattern, Hearth Bake Disks are designed specifically for use with the newer air impingement ovens operating at temperatures of 475F and higher using dough formulas devoid of any browning agents, such as sugar, milk or eggs. The Hex Disk is well suited to making a Domino's type of pizza as well as use in reheating certain types of pizza slices. This company also has a bunch of neat gadgets specific to the pizza industry. Take a look at their offerings. The Lloyd pans and disks are about as close to "bullet proof" as one can get.

Brilliant I will be adding Lloydspans to my contacts.  I hear alot about the anodized black pans.  The fact that you recommend this product highlights the quality of these pans.  Again thanks
Michael R