Author Topic: Neo-Neapolitan Style by Peter Reinhart  (Read 1501 times)

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Offline TomN

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Neo-Neapolitan Style by Peter Reinhart
« on: July 16, 2013, 02:01:44 PM »
i was looking at peter Reinhart's Neo-Neapolitan Dough recipe. He calls it that since he uses American Bread Flour instead of OO / Catputo flour. I was wondering if anyone has tried this with Pendelton Power Flour?  (That is my favorite flour to use.)

Here is the link for the complete recipe with instructions:

http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/instructionals/59-written-recipes/92-classic-pizza-dough-neo-neapolitan-style.html


5 1/4 cups (24 ounces by weight) unbleached bread flour
2 teaspoons (0.5 oz.) kosher salt
1 1/4 teaspoons (0.14 oz.) instant yeast (or 1 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast dissolved in the water)
2 tablespoons (1 oz.) olive oil (optional)
1 tablespoons (1/2 oz.) sugar or honey (optional)
2 1/4 cups (18 oz.) room temperature water (less if using honey or oil)

--You can mix this by hand with a big spoon or in an electric mixer using the paddle (not the dough hook).

--Combine all the ingredients in the bowl and mix for one minute, to form a coarse, sticky dough ball.

--Let the dough rest for five minutes, then mix again for one minute to make a smooth, very tacky ball of dough.



Online norma427

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Re: Neo-Neapolitan Style by Peter Reinhart
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2013, 10:26:02 PM »
Tom,

If you want to see where I experimented with Peter Reinhart's Classic Pizza Dough, Neo-Neapolitan-Style that thread is at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13037.0.html 

Norma
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Offline TomN

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Re: Neo-Neapolitan Style by Peter Reinhart
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2013, 07:08:17 PM »
Thanks Norma,

TomN

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Neo-Neapolitan Style by Peter Reinhart
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2013, 09:43:41 PM »
 Exactly what is a Neo-Neapolitan? ???

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Neo-Neapolitan Style by Peter Reinhart
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2013, 09:57:11 PM »
Dave,

In his book American Pie, Peter Reinhart defines Neo-Neapolitan pizza to mean New Haven style pizza and the "elite" style pizzas such as sold by Lombardi's, Totonno's and Grimaldi's. All of these are based on using coal-fired ovens.

Peter

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Neo-Neapolitan Style by Peter Reinhart
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2013, 11:01:06 PM »
Thanks Pete, I read his book a long time ago, in fact, when it first came out. Didn't remember the names of his doughs, don't think anyone else calls them the same thing. Wasn't too thrilled with his recipes, tried them once and moved on.

Offline TomN

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Re: Neo-Neapolitan Style by Peter Reinhart
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2013, 01:24:11 PM »
He explains this in the link to his recipe:

http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/instructionals/59-written-recipes/92-classic-pizza-dough-neo-neapolitan-style.html

"What makes this Neo-Neapolitan is that I use American bread flour instead of Italian -00- flour, but you can certainly use Italian flour, such as Caputo, if you want to make an authentic Napoletana dough."

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Neo-Neapolitan Style by Peter Reinhart
« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2013, 01:35:58 PM »
I'd say the sugar/honey and/or olive oil are a lot more "neo" than American flour as opposed to "00." I've yet to try a "00" other than Caputo Pizzeria that I like, and the new GM Neapolitan flour - which I don't see where they claim it to be "00" - makes a beautiful pizza that I would not hesitate in calling Neapolitan straight up without the "neo" qualifier.

That is a really wet dough - 78%. I think you'd be really hard pressed to find any Neapolitan pizzeria anywhere that high. Even if you think you need a wetter dough for the longer bake in a home oven, that seems really high. Also, I think 2% yeast is on the low side for NP. My guess is that 2.8-3.2% is more common.
Pizza is not bread.


 

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