Author Topic: Re: Best Flour  (Read 1166 times)

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Offline dsw@widenor.com

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Re: Best Flour
« on: July 16, 2013, 02:43:08 PM »
I am new to participating on PizzaMaking.com.  I was wondering what the members of this site consider as the BEST pizza flour and whether they weigh the flour or simply add the flour by the cup.  Any thoughts would be welcome.  Thanks
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Offline mkevenson

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Re: Best Flour
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2013, 03:03:51 PM »
DSW, I would suggest that you read the recipes of the various styles of pizza found in the forum index.
There are many brands and types of flour being used across the board, with fewer choices being used in each individual style category.
 
I personally have 3 flours that I have been using regularly both by themselves and in combo with each other. These would be Caputo 00 Pizzeria, King Arthur bread , and All Trumps. I have not figured out what style of pies I make but I like them.
 
I might suggest that you start with flour that is readilly available to you and try it. If you like it and don't like to experiment then your search is over, if however you like to experiment, there are many flours avail on line, even if you can't find them in your local stores.
 
Good luck.
 
Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Best Flour
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2013, 03:06:11 PM »
Yvonne,

There really is no good answer to the question on favorite flour. Flour types and brands are most often correlated with pizza style. And, even then, people can have different ideas as to the best flour and brand to use. And then there are members who won't use bromated flours whereas others will seek them out. Some members even blend different flours to meet their needs.

We have members who work with volume measurements and members who work with weights. Members who work with only volume measurements rarely last long on this forum. The most active and most popular members on the forum work almost exclusively with weights. They have scales and understand baker's percents and how to use them and manipulate them. The are even special tools to help them, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_tools.html .

Peter

Offline dsw@widenor.com

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Re: Best Flour
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2013, 08:20:19 AM »
That is interesting.
I did not know about the different types of flour until recently.
Weighing the flour seem more important than I initially thought.
We have been using Antimo Caputo tipo "00" and it make nice dough.
But when you just measure volume, you are not as consistent.
That is why I asked.
Thank you for your responses!
I greatly appreciated it.
For the Love of Pizza

Offline dsw@widenor.com

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Re: Best Flour
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2013, 08:34:29 AM »
I'm trying out the Lehman Pizza Dough Calculator and am wondering how the amount of active dry yeast affects pizza dough. If you use a higher percentage of yeast, will the dough be airier?
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Best Flour
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2013, 09:05:27 AM »
We have been using Antimo Caputo tipo "00"

What sort of oven do you bake in and at what temperature typically.

By Antimo Caputo tipo "00", do you mean the 1kg "chef's" flour?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Best Flour
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2013, 09:29:44 AM »
I'm trying out the Lehman Pizza Dough Calculator and am wondering how the amount of active dry yeast affects pizza dough. If you use a higher percentage of yeast, will the dough be airier?

Maybe, maybe not. It depends on where you are starting from. Unfortunately, there really isn't a simple answer, and getting to where you want often takes some trial-and-error.

More yeast will make your dough rise faster, all other things being equal. So will warmer temperatures. There is a mathematical relationship between yeast quantity, temperature, and time. To give you a better idea of what I mean, I quantified it here for a typical sourdough culture: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,22649.0.html

If you are looking for additional lightness (even light texture like white bread), it may be a simple matter of adding a little more yeast and keeping everything else the same. If this works, it might imply that perhaps you simply are not currently getting enough rise as things are. You could probably get to the same place by warming up the dough a little as it ferments or by letting it ferment a little longer.

If you are looking for a more open structure (large open holes in the crumb), using less yeast and fermenting longer at a lower temperature often helps. You still take the dough to about the same level of rise (in the ballpark of double the original size) you just let it take longer to get there - probably a minimum of 12 hours and 24 would be better. The other thing that really helps achieve an open structure is heat - particularly conduction from the bottom - such as in a hot pizza stone.
Pizza is not bread.