Author Topic: Dual stones in oven  (Read 343 times)

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Offline DDT

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Dual stones in oven
« on: April 14, 2015, 04:50:05 PM »
I did a search and don't see a lot of people using an upper and lower stone in a home oven. I have an older electric wall oven that does ok with stone on lowest rack. I use a super peel so can not put the upper one too close but was wondering if would help or make the pies cook slower with two. I also have a new wave clamshell pizza oven and in the few times I have used it don't think it is any faster than my wall oven using one stone. Can just try it but hate to waste time if others know it is worse.
Thanks
D


Offline nick57

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Re: Dual stones in oven
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2015, 08:14:26 PM »
 Tony Gemignani author of the Pizza Bible recommends two stones for use in a home oven setting. He says it will make for a crisper crust. He cooks the pie on one stone for the first few minutes, then transfers the pie to the other stone for the remainder of the bake. Some forum members use two stones to create an even heating environment for the top and bottom, and do the entire cook on the bottom stone. Just remember to pre-heat the stone for at least an hour before baking. You may get some better info by searching the forum with the words "two stones."  If your oven is weak, cook at it's highest temp for most pies. Another style is to use steel for the bottom and a stone above. But, that comes with it's own set of unique baking problems.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2015, 08:42:35 PM by nick57 »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Dual stones in oven
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2015, 08:39:26 PM »
I've been doing that with great results in the home oven.

Offline DDT

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Re: Dual stones in oven
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2015, 12:14:07 AM »
I've been doing that with great results in the home oven.

Do you mean two stones or a stone and a steel? I tried two stones tonight with a no knead dough I froze a few weeks ago and a store bought dough ball ( Passione pizza). I am not sure how much better it worked than a single stone. Wife and bro loved them both. Home made went in second so stone was not as hot. Here is the home made dough. Margarita with mushrooms.

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Dual stones in oven
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2015, 12:33:46 AM »
I use 2 stones in my GE electric oven. One near the top heating element and one near the bottom.  Also using the broiler setting,you can load your pie at a temp of upwards of 650F or more.   During the bake, I then switch the pie between the two stones during the bake.

Offline hodgey1

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Re: Dual stones in oven
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2015, 07:30:14 AM »
I did a search and don't see a lot of people using an upper and lower stone in a home oven. I have an older electric wall oven that does ok with stone on lowest rack. I use a super peel so can not put the upper one too close but was wondering if would help or make the pies cook slower with two.

I use two stones in my home gas oven with very good results for a few years now. My bottom stone has sides, so I purchased a new stone that sits directly on top of the sides and creates a box configuration. I do not move the pizza to the other stone part way through cooking, but i do turn the pie midway through the 7-8 minute bake time.

A mistake I made when purchasing the second stone was not paying attention to the depth. It is not as deep as the bottom stone and in turn does not cover the entire top of the pie since not being as deep as the bottom stone and why I have to turn midway. 

The result of having the second stone are worth the extra few bucks, the tops of my pie turn out way better and eliminates the need to finish a pie under a broiler like some here on PMF do. If I forget to turn the pie, the proof that two stones are better becomes very apparent, because the side sticking out beyond the upper aren't nearly as browned as the rest.

Just my $.02

Offline DDT

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Re: Dual stones in oven
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2015, 12:18:43 PM »
Thanks to all for the tips. I am gonna try a few more dual stone bakes. They both read about 530-560 on the infared. Now I need to get my dough down. The no knead tastes great, has the texture we like but is hard to open but that has been discussed in the dough doctor thread.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dual stones in oven
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2015, 04:51:02 PM »
D,

I am a little bit late in responding to your post on this subject but the idea of using two pizza stones goes back several years, as was noted, for example, at Reply 53 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30759.msg346223;topicseen#msg346223.

More recently, there has been a fair amount of discussion about using two stones, or baking steels, attributed to Tony Gemignani, both in his new book The Pizza Bible and his related forum. These posts address what Tony has said on the matter:

Reply 223 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=34845.msg357936#msg357936

Reply 10 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=35902.msg357770;topicseen#msg357770

There is also a thread that was directed specifically to the idea of using two stones, at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6508.msg55772#msg55772

That thread goes beyond the use of two stones to some other interesting alternatives.

Peter