Author Topic: New Stove/Oven recommendations  (Read 312 times)

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Offline hodgey1

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New Stove/Oven recommendations
« on: April 12, 2016, 05:36:14 PM »
First, I value the ideas, suggestions and opinions members have here, so thanks in advance for your help.

My wife and I both love to cook and made no consideration of that 15 years ago when we married and built a house together. It mostly had to do with money at the time, and we definitely didn't do any high end anything in the kitchen. My current stove is beyond a piece of junk and needs desperately to become scrap iron. We also, have an oven space problem. Every holiday we host here, up to 25 people and also do large "9 people" Sunday dinners here every week. We desperately need either, a double oven stove or a wall unit added.

So, my questions: we would like to purchase a really good commercial style/home pro stove and possible a wall oven. What have you folks purchased in that category that you just love and wouldn't live without/recommend? I know the stove is a biggie..$...... i think are budget is up to $10k ish for either a double oven stove or a single with the addition of a wall unit. Of course I'd like to be lower, in the $6k range but trying to be realistic.

Second question is: Double oven stove or go single with the addition of a wall unit?

We currently have the standard 30" piece-O-crap, I think we have room to grow up to 48" wide on the stove.

Some features that intrigues me are: The possibility of a oven with steam for bread baking and maybe even a oven that will go higher than 550*F, oh yea and a grill or flat top on the stove. None of those are set in stone though...........
« Last Edit: April 12, 2016, 06:11:41 PM by hodgey1 »

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: New Stove/Oven recommendations
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2016, 08:38:34 PM »
I have owned a few high end stoves, but am not used to cooking for 25 people.  You will probably get some more info from the gardenweb on appliance suggestions  http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/appl/  but for those of us that don't have large cooking needs, many have gone with a free standing range and a combi oven.  I have just started using my combi for bread, the first several attempts when I got it a few years ago were not very successful, my combi is not set up like a bread oven that injects steam,  but I did try again with some tricks and it came out better.  The primary benefits of a combi are for just when you are cooking for a few people, it comes up to temp in 5 to 10 minutes, most full sized ovens are closer to 30 minutes, and most of them have a reheat mode that lets you reheat things much better than a microwave, and they don't dry out.  It is also pretty cool to put some shrimp in the perforated pan, and a few minutes later you have steamed shrimp. 
  My suggestion is to design your kitchen to handle the 9 people, and make arrangements to handle huge crowds that are only a few times a year by either cooking some things in advance, or buying a countertop oven you can keep in a attic when not needed ( you can find used commercial countertops on Craigslist - search for Cadco or Unox -  though make sure you get one that uses 120 volts )   I have a BlueStar range and love it, though it may not be your cup of tea - it has a pretty industrial look, and some like a cleaner look.   I have the 30 inch, but the 36 inch has a much bigger oven.  You might want to look to see if that would handle the dinners for 9 with the help of the combi oven using convection mode. Many like the idea of an induction rangetop, and electric ovens, either single or double, but I have never used induction, so have no personal opinion.   

Offline hodgey1

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Re: New Stove/Oven recommendations
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2016, 08:37:01 PM »
I have owned a few high end stoves, but am not used to cooking for 25 people.  You will probably get some more info from the gardenweb on appliance suggestions  http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/appl/  but for those of us that don't have large cooking needs, many have gone with a free standing range and a combi oven.  I have just started using my combi for bread, the first several attempts when I got it a few years ago were not very successful, my combi is not set up like a bread oven that injects steam,  but I did try again with some tricks and it came out better.  The primary benefits of a combi are for just when you are cooking for a few people, it comes up to temp in 5 to 10 minutes, most full sized ovens are closer to 30 minutes, and most of them have a reheat mode that lets you reheat things much better than a microwave, and they don't dry out.  It is also pretty cool to put some shrimp in the perforated pan, and a few minutes later you have steamed shrimp. 
  My suggestion is to design your kitchen to handle the 9 people, and make arrangements to handle huge crowds that are only a few times a year by either cooking some things in advance, or buying a countertop oven you can keep in a attic when not needed ( you can find used commercial countertops on Craigslist - search for Cadco or Unox -  though make sure you get one that uses 120 volts )   I have a BlueStar range and love it, though it may not be your cup of tea - it has a pretty industrial look, and some like a cleaner look.   I have the 30 inch, but the 36 inch has a much bigger oven.  You might want to look to see if that would handle the dinners for 9 with the help of the combi oven using convection mode. Many like the idea of an induction rangetop, and electric ovens, either single or double, but I have never used induction, so have no personal opinion.   

Barry, thanks for taking the time for such a detailed reply. Industrial look of a range doesn't bother me. Is the BlueStar something you'd recommend?

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: New Stove/Oven recommendations
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2016, 07:01:28 AM »
I have it and like it, ridiculous amounts of power at the burners -  if a recipe says turn the burner to high, on the BS that is about medium.  The main thing I liked about it is that there is very little in the way of electronics. Most ranges these days have circuit boards to handle much of the controls, and there are numerous posts on failed circuit boards and the expense of replacing them, and the frustration when they can no longer be found. I  didn't look at one in person, but if you like the lack of electronics, Capital is another option.

Offline hodgey1

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Re: New Stove/Oven recommendations
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2016, 10:52:32 AM »
I have it and like it, ridiculous amounts of power at the burners -  if a recipe says turn the burner to high, on the BS that is about medium.  The main thing I liked about it is that there is very little in the way of electronics. Most ranges these days have circuit boards to handle much of the controls, and there are numerous posts on failed circuit boards and the expense of replacing them, and the frustration when they can no longer be found. I  didn't look at one in person, but if you like the lack of electronics, Capital is another option.

Barry,
Capital and BlueStar are fairly electronic free?

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: New Stove/Oven recommendations
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2016, 08:07:54 PM »
Hodge1, they have some electronics, but not as much as many.  The ovens on the Capital and Bluestar ranges both come with an oven with a dial control that is marked in degrees.   ( I have never seen the Capital in person, but from what I have read, it is just a simple dial on the gas model.  The Dual Fuel  has an electronic control pad )   On the Bluestar, if you want the oven to go to 350, you turn the dial to 350,  if you want convection, you push a button and it turns on a fan.  So the oven is pretty dirt simple.  It probably has a circuit to tell the glow bar how long to stay on to get the oven burner or broiler to light, but that is it.  So many ovens have a digital keypad with timers, etc, and it can be like programming a digital watch to get it to work.   Many posters have reported overheating the digital controls, and having a circuit board cut out.  Actually, the Blue Star and the Capital are usually mentioned in the same sentence because they are some of the few that still offer an open burner.  While many prefer a sealed burner,  there is an avid group of open burner fans.  The theories are that it allows better flow directly to the bottom of the pan, instead of out to the sides,  and all other things being equal it can simmer at a lower level, it doesn't show every speck of dirt that you see on a sealed burner.  Of course, burner design plays a large role in some of that, and opinions vary as to whether the industrial look of a Blue Star or Capital looks as good as a sealed burner when it is clean.