Author Topic: Ripieno Fritto  (Read 1012 times)

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Offline hotsawce

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Ripieno Fritto
« on: July 06, 2013, 08:06:14 PM »
I'm going to try making ripieno fritto, or the classic fried neapolitan calzone, for the first time. I've read a number of threads, including Marco's. I understand it is the same neapolitan dough, but still have some questions.

What is the typical dough ball weight for the fried calzone, how is it sealed well (does one just press it until it seems sealed? Is it deep fried completely sealed (no holes to release any pressure, and at what temperature is it typically fried?


Online Mmmph

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Re: Ripieno Fritto
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2013, 09:05:32 PM »
Make sure you use a young dough...Not fermented. Otherwise the skin will not be smooth.
Seal it good, making sure there's no sauce or other ingredients preventing a good seal.

I use 250g-270g doughball. Try not to leave any air inside

Deep fry at  350F-375F in peanut oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil or canola oil.

Good luck and good eating.
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Offline jeffereynelson

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Re: Ripieno Fritto
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2013, 09:07:23 PM »
When you say young, how young are you talking?

Online Mmmph

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Re: Ripieno Fritto
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2013, 09:14:58 PM »
The dough should show evidence of rising, but should not be too "bubbly".

Left - Young
Right - Fermented
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Offline jeffereynelson

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Re: Ripieno Fritto
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2013, 09:30:46 PM »
The dough should show evidence of rising, but should not be too "bubbly".

Left - Young
Right - Fermented

Got it, empanada, not pizza.

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Ripieno Fritto
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2013, 08:44:09 AM »
Any reason you prefer less air in the dough aside from aesthetics?

Online Mmmph

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Re: Ripieno Fritto
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2013, 12:20:04 PM »
It's just how I ate them as a youngster. There was a pizza shop that served these and they looked like the one on the left. They told me used young dough, before it was fully risen. They'd fry up a batch i the morning and leave them in a big steel bowl on the counter. If you wanted one, they'd toss one in the oven to heat it through. When they sold out, there would be no more until tomorrow. They only served them with mozzarella, ham and tomato sauce inside.
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Offline jeffereynelson

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Re: Ripieno Fritto
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2013, 03:36:05 PM »
It's just how I ate them as a youngster. There was a pizza shop that served these and they looked like the one on the left. They told me used young dough, before it was fully risen. They'd fry up a batch i the morning and leave them in a big steel bowl on the counter. If you wanted one, they'd toss one in the oven to heat it through. When they sold out, there would be no more until tomorrow. They only served them with mozzarella, ham and tomato sauce inside.

I wonder why not fry them to order? I mean it would take less time then a pizza by a long shot. I tried it last night and made one and it was very good. I didn't put sauce in though, it was more like a calzone.


 

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