Author Topic: Whole grain flour adjustments  (Read 147 times)

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Offline hotwatermusic

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Whole grain flour adjustments
« on: June 27, 2016, 01:57:24 AM »
I bought some Hard Red Winter Wheat flour from Community Grains. It's whole milled and so will have a pretty high ash content. They mention that it may require a higher hydration %. Has anyone used this or a similar flour? I figure the feel will tell me what it needs but I'm just curious how much I will have to go up from my usual, ≈61%.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Whole grain flour adjustments
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2016, 02:49:58 AM »
Pretty easy if you're going to make 100% whole grain pizza crusts.
You will need a scale and a small bowl.
Weigh out any amount of flour into the bowl (I like to use 100-grams.
Add water to the flour and stir to incorporate. The flour should look something like breakfast oatmeal.
Set everything aside and allow the flour to hydrate for about an hour (not less than 30-minutes.
The flour will look dry and lumpy, add more water and stir in until it looks like oatmeal again.
Allow the flour to hydrate again.
Keep doing this until the flour-water mixture retains the oatmeal appearance after an hour of hydration time.
Weigh the flour-water mixture and subtract the tare weight of the bowl.
Now subtract the weight of flour that you started with. This will tell you how much water you had to add.
Divide the weight of the water by the weight of the flour and multiply by 100. This will give you the total absorption percent of the flour, now subtract 5% from that number and that is the absorption you will need to use when making your dough. Failure to follow this procedure in determining generally results in a finished crust more like cardboard than a pizza crust.
NOTE: The finished (mixed) dough will be slightly tacky, don't worry as this is normal for a whole grain dough (if it isn't tacky your absorption is too low). The dough will continue to hydrate during the cold fermentation period and the dough balls will feel pretty normal after the cold ferment period. Whole grain doughs don't hold up very well due to the cutting action of the bran flakes on the gluten film so it's best to limit the cold fermentation to not more than 24-hours.
I've covered this procedure in one of my articles (In Lehmann's Terms) in PMQ Magazine at <www.pmq.com>
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline hotwatermusic

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Re: Whole grain flour adjustments
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2016, 01:21:28 PM »
Thanks Doc. That seems like a pretty elegant solution. I'll give it a go.


 

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