Author Topic: Check out this puzzling pizza stone phenomenon (pix)  (Read 2235 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Fio

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 277
  • Cook it HOT.
Check out this puzzling pizza stone phenomenon (pix)
« on: February 16, 2006, 08:54:27 AM »
I hope the pictures post, because I'm having trouble with them.

I tried a two-tier baking arrangement.  I put a regular pizza stone on the bottom, and firebrick splits on top.  After baking four pies, I noticed that the cornmeal left on the firebrick splits was charred black, whereas the residual cornmeal on the pizza stone was brown.  From this I concluded that the splits got hotter because they were closer to the top heating element.

Then I got a new Fibrament stone.  I put it on the bottom, removed the firebrick splits, and moved my old pizza stone to the top rack.  I expected that the cornmeal left on the top pizza stone would end up charred black, just as had happened with the firebrick splits.

The opposite happened!  The residual cornmeal on the Fibrament stone was charred black; the residual cornmeal on the other pizza stone was brown.  See pix.

What do you conclude from THAT?  Does my pizza stone just not get as hot as the splits or the fibrament stone?
Since joining this forum, I've begun using words like "autolyze" and have become anal about baker's percents.  My dough is forever changed.


Offline Perk

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 189
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Jacksonville
  • Dreams of Pizza!
Re: Check out this puzzling pizza stone phenomenon (pix)
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2006, 09:11:17 AM »
interesting, how does the pizza's come out? Is there any difference between the two stones in cook time?
-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21203
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Check out this puzzling pizza stone phenomenon (pix)
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2006, 09:44:35 AM »
Fio,

Were the pizzas different? Since different sizes and weights of pizzas can absorb more or less heat from the stone (heat transfer is from a hot object to a cooler object), the temperature at the stone level might end up being above or below the point where the cornmeal burns. As Perks points out, the bake time can also be a factor.

Peter

Offline Fio

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 277
  • Cook it HOT.
Re: Check out this puzzling pizza stone phenomenon (pix)
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2006, 09:52:17 AM »
Fio,

Were the pizzas different? Since different sizes and weights of pizzas can absorb more or less heat from the stone (heat transfer is from a hot object to a cooler object), the temperature at the stone level might end up being above or below the point where the cornmeal burns. As Perks points out, the bake time can also be a factor.

Peter

I was in such a hurry (cooking for a crowd) that I did not notice any difference in cook time or doneness. (I cook my pizzas for 6 minutes each (3 min, turn, 3 min, remove from oven).

The guests raved about the pizzas, so there was no major perceptible difference in the way they came out.

All the pizzas were the same - size, thickness, amounts of cheese, sauce, and toppings.

To be honest, I should really have paid more attention.  I was just having too much fun.

Since joining this forum, I've begun using words like "autolyze" and have become anal about baker's percents.  My dough is forever changed.


 

pizzapan