Author Topic: screens  (Read 734 times)

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Offline milt

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screens
« on: July 31, 2013, 04:43:27 PM »
One of the methods I have tried for baking pizza is to open up the dough and put all the toppings on while it is on a screen then put the whole thing in the oven, when I remove the pie it is stuck to the screen. the time between putting the dough on the screen and getting it into the oven is about 15 min. or more. The reason for that amount of time is the pie is made in the house then I put it in the car and have to drive it down to the garage where the oven is. It's an electric 220v and can only be plugged in at the garage.

Is this just to much time on the screen or is there something I can do to solve this problem. I also have a hard time when putting the dough on a wood peel I have taken to using parchment paper, Is that the only answer?


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: screens
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2013, 04:46:00 PM »
Any reason why you can't stretch the dough and top the pizza at the garage?

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: screens
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2013, 04:54:22 PM »
When you're using a screen and your dough exhibits a decided propensity to flow into the screen openings it usually means that your dough is over absorbed and too soft for use on the screen. The new Hex Disks from Lloyd Pans have a smaller opening than the usual metal screens so they offer better resistance to this problem. The fact that you are also having a problem using a wood peel also give insight that you might have too much water in the dough. Always be sure to use some "peel dust" under the skin when you place it onto a wood peel for dressing. While there are many different ideas as to what constitutes a good peel dust, my personal favorite is equal parts regular pizza flour, semolina flour and fine cornmeal.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline milt

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Re: screens
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2013, 05:02:08 PM »
Any reason why you can't stretch the dough and top the pizza at the garage?

It's a dirty garage ;D and not really good for food prep. I keep a small area as clean as I can for the oven but the rest is full of cars, parts, tools, welders, mowers, etc, etc. I pre heat the oven get the pie in the oven then out as quick as I can and back to the house. 

Offline milt

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Re: screens
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2013, 05:08:26 PM »
When you're using a screen and your dough exhibits a decided propensity to flow into the screen openings it usually means that your dough is over absorbed and too soft for use on the screen. The new Hex Disks from Lloyd Pans have a smaller opening than the usual metal screens so they offer better resistance to this problem. The fact that you are also having a problem using a wood peel also give insight that you might have too much water in the dough. Always be sure to use some "peel dust" under the skin when you place it onto a wood peel for dressing. While there are many different ideas as to what constitutes a good peel dust, my personal favorite is equal parts regular pizza flour, semolina flour and fine cornmeal.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Thanks for the advice,now I have some other options to try.
So much to learn, so little time :)

Offline patdakat345

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Re: screens
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2013, 08:53:44 AM »
I use a mixture of  2/3 cup of salad oil and 1/3cup liquid lecithin, shake it up and brush on both sides of the screen.  This mixture is essentially Pam. A lot less wasteful, as there is no overspray.

I stretch the dough to the approximate size put it on the screen and stretch to final size. Put on toppings.

Never have a problem. Got this out of a bread book about 25 years ago. Use the mixture in bread pans, cookie sheets or any other  pan for pizza.

Pat

Offline patdakat345

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Re: screens
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2013, 06:26:11 AM »
I erred in that the salad oil should be vegetable based, such as Canola.

pat

Offline milt

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Re: screens
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2013, 07:58:46 AM »
I erred in that the salad oil should be vegetable based, such as Canola.

pat

Thanks will give that a try, I think the dough is wrapping around the mesh due to the extended time on the screen and the bumpy ride down the dirt driveway and expanding when baked.

Offline milt

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Re: screens
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2013, 07:42:57 PM »
Well I launched my first pizza today with out using parchment paper, I used a wood peel, put some flour on it rubbed it in then added some cornmeal on top. After opening up the dough, adding the toppings, shaking it between each step it went into the oven with no problem. the pie was oblong to start with so I am happy with the end product. Want to thank everyone for there help. I feel like I just went from a white belt to a yellow belt ;D


 

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