Author Topic: Simple Pan Pizza questions  (Read 991 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Malanga

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 78
Simple Pan Pizza questions
« on: July 31, 2013, 05:45:12 PM »
Have myself a nice 15" cast iron.  Looking for a way to utilize it for pizza.  So, a few quickies:

1.  Thickness factor?  What's ideal?
2.  Hydration? 
*** for both of the above, could I just stick with my NY dough (I've used this as a template http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,18694.msg182483.html#msg182483)

3. Is a stone necessary?  (I use quarry tile; wondering if they will crack under the iron). 
4. Even if no stone under the pan, should I create a ceiling for browning? (I do NOT have a top broiler.  Yep, stuck with the bottom only heating element).
5. Best temps and times?

Okay, so I may be pushing it with that last question.  Any advice you all have would be well appreciated.  Thanks guys!  Pizza-on!


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 985
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: Simple Pan Pizza questions
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2013, 10:37:28 AM »
Mal;
I like to use 14-ounces of dough for my 12-inch deep-dish pizzas (for a dough density of 0.124-ounces per square inch of pan surface area). All of my pans are dark colored so I don't need to bake them on a stone, but I do need to move them around in the oven. I start out with the pizza on a lower rack position to get the bottom started (about 2/3 of the total baking time) and then move the pizza to a higher rack position to achieve the top bake that I'm looking for. When I've used a stone I always end up with a darker bottom color/bake than what I like. My oven is an electric oven with only a bottom element in the oven chamber and I bake at 425F. Total baking time typically runs about 20-minutes, maybe a little longer. I normally don't bake to time, but instead prefer to bake to color and doneness. I look for the nice, golden brown top color and then use a cake decorating spatula to pick the pizza up out of the pan to get a peek at the bottom. If the color is nicely browned, it's done.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline apizza

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 407
  • Location: Wethersfield, CT
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Simple Pan Pizza questions
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2013, 03:02:30 PM »
There is a thread here about cast iron pizza.
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,23064.0.html
Marty

Offline Malanga

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 78
Re: Simple Pan Pizza questions
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2013, 05:45:17 PM »
Mal;
I like to use 14-ounces of dough for my 12-inch deep-dish pizzas (for a dough density of 0.124-ounces per square inch of pan surface area). All of my pans are dark colored so I don't need to bake them on a stone, but I do need to move them around in the oven. I start out with the pizza on a lower rack position to get the bottom started (about 2/3 of the total baking time) and then move the pizza to a higher rack position to achieve the top bake that I'm looking for. When I've used a stone I always end up with a darker bottom color/bake than what I like. My oven is an electric oven with only a bottom element in the oven chamber and I bake at 425F. Total baking time typically runs about 20-minutes, maybe a little longer. I normally don't bake to time, but instead prefer to bake to color and doneness. I look for the nice, golden brown top color and then use a cake decorating spatula to pick the pizza up out of the pan to get a peek at the bottom. If the color is nicely browned, it's done.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Thank you for the tips and info Dr. Lehmann!  Feeling a bit lucky here having a legend offer me advice!  I like the idea of moving the pie around during the bake and even with my NY style, I keep my eye on the pie and wait for the right color (well, as "right" as I can get it!).

I'll be sure to come through with pics when I give it a go.  (Still curing the cast iron- initial stages that is- and the temps kicked up around here the last couple of days).

Marty, thanks for the link!  I appreciate it.


 

pizzapan