Author Topic: Commercial Dough Mixer Question  (Read 400 times)

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Offline Gianni5

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Commercial Dough Mixer Question
« on: November 22, 2014, 09:57:12 PM »
The only commercial dough mixer I've worked with are Hobart Planetary mixers.  They run close to $30k for the 140qt capacity unit which is the one we need.  You can find them used for $8k-$10k pretty easily.
    My question is what are the major differences between this type of mixer and a spiral or fork mixer.  I can find a spiral or fork mixer for $8k-$10k brand new. 
Thanks
   


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Commercial Dough Mixer Question
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2014, 10:13:54 PM »
Tom Lehmann talks about some of the differences between a planetary mixer and a spiral mixer (but not a fork mixer) in a recent video at https://www.pmq.com/November-2014/PMQ-Live-Chat-with-Dough-Doctor-Tom-Lehmann/index.php .

Peter

Offline Gianni5

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Re: Commercial Dough Mixer Question
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2014, 11:56:02 PM »
Thank you Peter

Online GotRocks

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Re: Commercial Dough Mixer Question
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2014, 02:39:35 PM »
After using a spiral mixer for dough for the last year, I do not ever see myself using a planetary mixer ever again.

But, a spiral mixer is only capable of dough, whereas a planetary unit has so much more capabilities for other tasks associated with pizza such as sauce mixing, cheese shredded, meat grinding,

I've got a POS globe 20qt planetary that only gets used as a power unit for my grinder, and to whip garlic butter. I've found an immersion blender to be our best for sauce, and I used Grande Diced whole-milk so cheese prep is not needed.
A skinny cook is not to be trusted!

Offline Gianni5

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Re: Commercial Dough Mixer Question
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2014, 09:39:52 PM »
Thanks Gotrocks,
That's similar to what Tom Lehman said in the video Pete-zza posted. It seems like for strictly mixing dough the spiral mixer is the way to go. We do use our planetary mixer in our other stores to mix our sauce and actually our meatballs too. We will have a Vertical cutter mixer that I think will work for our sauce so we should be ok.
   Do you mind telling me how a spiral mixer superior to a planetary mixer as far as dough making is concerned?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Commercial Dough Mixer Question
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2014, 10:12:52 PM »
Gianni5,

You might find this thread and the links referenced therein of interest:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12552.msg120025.html#msg120025

Peter

Online GotRocks

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Re: Commercial Dough Mixer Question
« Reply #6 on: Today at 10:18:42 PM »
Thanks Gotrocks,
That's similar to what Tom Lehman said in the video Pete-zza posted. It seems like for strictly mixing dough the spiral mixer is the way to go. We do use our planetary mixer in our other stores to mix our sauce and actually our meatballs too. We will have a Vertical cutter mixer that I think will work for our sauce so we should be ok.
   Do you mind telling me how a spiral mixer superior to a planetary mixer as far as dough making is concerned?

Just for kicks, I tried my spiral mixer for mixing the seasonings into our sausage, and it did a real decent job of it, it did not generate as much friction heat that melts the fat, so I'll be using my spiral mixer for mixing our  sausage now too. The 30 QT bowl held 50 pounds of ground meat,
I also hope to get a VCM one day, but I seem to be waiting until I actually need one.
A skinny cook is not to be trusted!


 

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