Author Topic: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn  (Read 32356 times)

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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #100 on: October 17, 2015, 08:58:44 AM »
New batch of pancetta tesa after curing for 3 weeks:

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #101 on: October 17, 2015, 09:07:17 AM »
I renew my oft asked question; why am I not your neighbor?
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline norcoscia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #102 on: October 17, 2015, 10:57:24 AM »
I feel comfortable saying that looks like museum quality pancetta. Outstanding work!!!!

PS. Rather than ask why I'm not your neighbor would it be possible to call dibs on it   :-D
Norm

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #103 on: October 17, 2015, 11:29:27 AM »
Thanks, Craig and Norm. But before any one puts their house up for sale and takes the kids out of school, you must know this pancetta is stoopidly easy to make if you can maintain humidity at around 65% and temp around 60F for a few weeks. The hardest part for me was sourcing quality pork belly. A few months ago in Costco I almost choked on a free sample of bagel  when I discovered beautiful pork bellies in the meat dept.   

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #104 on: October 17, 2015, 11:40:27 AM »
Bill, maybe you could foster some of us for a few weeks at a time like they do with dogs from the pound! Speaking for myself, I'm housebroken/potty trained.........mostly :-D
“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain

If you don't think you're getting what you should out of life.....maybe you're getting what you deserve       -the Root Beer Lady

Offline amccabe

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #105 on: January 05, 2016, 10:47:08 AM »
Bill,

You have inspired me so much via this post that I decided to leap in and make a curing chamber.  I did some research and ended up with a True GDM-10 refridgerator and just finished up building out my temperature and humidity controller.  Since I am in Phoenix I am pretty sure I will only need to cool/humidify (I hope).  I hope to setup the chamber tonight and test its temperature stability and humidity.  Pancetta Tesa is in the plans for this weekend if costco has some good looking bellies.  I also have the Lardo Typico in the fridge right now which should be done 6/1.  Now I just need to find a good phoenix source for all of the other cuts!

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #106 on: January 05, 2016, 11:43:28 AM »
Nice cooler! Congrats. Looking forward to seeing your results posted here.

Offline amccabe

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #107 on: January 16, 2016, 12:21:56 PM »
Ok I just finished curing the belly that I got from a local butcher in the fridge and it is now hung in my curing chamber.  I decided to go with the pancetta arrotolata.  My fridge has a nice big fan at the top and turns on every 30 mins so I think that may be sufficient air circulation.  I also plan on opening the fridge once a day to exchange the air.  The meat smelled amazing coming out of the cure.


Offline corkd

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #108 on: May 05, 2016, 08:59:39 AM »
A small batch of Pancetta tesa cured 3weeks in the basement. I used locally raised pork sold by a butcher in Ithaca NY. Delicious, creamy fat. The book said to be picky about where you source your pork- good tip!

Clay

Offline pizapizza

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #109 on: May 07, 2016, 08:07:57 PM »
first try at pancetta. didnt use the recipe in this book


 

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