Author Topic: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...  (Read 700 times)

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Offline juniorballoon

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Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« on: August 12, 2013, 12:28:57 PM »
I have three extra dough balls from last night. They were cold fermented for 4 days and then at room temp for 4 hours. I didn't get a chance to use them. I reballed and put them back in the fridge. Will they still be good tomorrow?

Thanks,
jb


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2013, 12:45:12 PM »
jb,

If the dough balls worked fine last night, I think you should be OK but it would help to see your dough formulation.

Peter

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2013, 12:55:09 PM »
I made fried dough last night with a dough that was almost a month old. Even though it was a bit soft and gloppy, it still made some great tasting eats. You should have no problem with your dough, if it's a little sticky just work it gently and use a little extra bench flour.

Offline juniorballoon

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2013, 12:56:57 PM »
jb,

If the dough balls worked fine last night, I think you should be OK but it would help to see your dough formulation.

Peter

Bakers percents.

Flour: 75% KABF, 25% Bob's Redmill Semolina
Water: 60%
Yeast: ADY .4%
Salt: 2%
Olive Oil: 2%

Thanks,
jb

Offline juniorballoon

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2013, 12:58:18 PM »
I made fried dough last night with a dough that was almost a month old. Even though it was a bit soft and gloppy, it still made some great tasting eats. You should have no problem with your dough, if it's a little sticky just work it gently and use a little extra bench flour.

Wow. A month? That is surprising. And what is fried dough?

Thanks,
jb

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2013, 01:35:44 PM »
Bakers percents.

Flour: 75% KABF, 25% Bob's Redmill Semolina
Water: 60%
Yeast: ADY .4%
Salt: 2%
Olive Oil: 2%

Thanks,
jb
jb,

When you know in advance that the dough is to cold ferment for more than two or three days, and especially when the amount of yeast is on the elevated side (yours is a bit high for a 4+ day cold ferment), it is usually prudent to add 1-2% sugar to the dough to be sure that the yeast is adequately fed throught the increased fermentation period and to be sure that there is enough residual sugar at the time of baking to contribute to crust coloration. The four hours that the dough spent at room temperature before you refrigerated it did not help since it used up more of the natural sugars than might be desired. Sometimes the combination of events like these can mean that your crusts will be a bit lighter in color than normal. In extreme cases, you can end up with a compromised oven spring and a somewhat flattish crust. You won't know for sure until you use the dough to make pizzas.

Please let us know how the pizzas turn out.

Peter


Offline juniorballoon

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2013, 06:59:02 PM »
I just checked on them and they are very active. Hopefully they have enough juice to get to tomorrow. I noticed several Lehman cold ferment recipes call for .25 of IDY and I read you are supposed to use 25% more if using ADY. My ratio looks like it's about .09 to .08 high. I'll look into pulling that back and adding a bit of sugar. Is there a cut off at which you do or don't need the sugar? 3 days no, 4 days yes?

Thanks,
jb

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2013, 07:26:05 PM »
jb,

You can read Tom Lehmann's advice on the matter of adding some sugar for a dough that is to be cold fermented beyond two days in his PMQ Think Tank post at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4669&hilit=#p26890 . It is hard to be precise on these matters because of the many possible temperature variations, including room temperature, flour and water temperatures, finished dough temperature and fermentation temperatures (refrigerator and temper temperatures).

Using 0.25% IDY is more compatible with summer temperatures. For winter temperatures, a value such as you used might be more appropriate.

I think it is a bit too early to worry about your dough balls. They will perform what they were programmed to do, including the changes in that programming that resulted from your decision to postpone use of some of the original dough balls. The good news is that you should learn something from the experience.

Peter

Offline juniorballoon

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2013, 01:23:35 AM »
Pizza turned out just fine, perhaps a bit chewier. Other than that I couldn't tell the difference between the former and the latter.

Pics here.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26914.0.html

jb

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2013, 08:18:34 AM »
jb,

I'm glad that everything worked out well for you. At the time that I posted, I did not know that you were intending to use your BlackStone unit rather than a stone in a home oven to bake the pizzas. I learned that after I went back and looked at some of your earlier posts. Now that I see the photos of the pizzas, it occurs to me that the bottom crust areas outside of the charring look to be a lighter in color (whiter) than might ordinarily be expected, at least in a home oven with a stone. Maybe it is the lighting of the photos or possibly the results that are to be expected when using the BlackStone unit. Either way, you might want to keep the amounts of sugar and yeast in mind in your future experiments when using the BlackStone unit. If you do conduct more BlackStone experiments in the near future, especially those using sugar in the dough, it would be interesting to see the results you achieve.

Peter


Offline juniorballoon

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Re: Cold fermented dough that has risen at room temp...
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2013, 12:17:36 PM »
I would chalk it up to the Blackstone, at least in part. It has a hot zone at the rim. There can be an 80 degree difference between the center and the edge due to the placement of the flame. I was thinking earlier today that having some flame in the center, perhaps not as strong as what is on the edge, might help balance that.

I will have to do some more reading about using sugar in a dough recipe. I prefer savory to sweet, though I realize the amount of sugar we're talking about won't make these a desert dough.

I was quite surprised at how active these dough balls were when put back in the fridge. One of them actually blew the top off the container and had completely filled the tub to the rim. I put the lid back on and a few hours later it had decreased by about a third. I wondered if it had used up all the yeast, but when I pulled them to sit at room temp they all doubled in size by the time I was ready to open them.

Thanks for your thoughts Peter.

jb


 

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