Author Topic: Relevance of bread machine yeast vs active dry yeast  (Read 2804 times)

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Offline ihavezippers

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Relevance of bread machine yeast vs active dry yeast
« on: January 27, 2006, 01:08:46 PM »
I recently bought bread machine yeast (Fleichman's) instead of what I've bought in the past, active dry yeast (not sure of the brand, but defintely not Fleichman's).  Is there a significant difference between "Bread machine" yeast and "active dry yeast"?
(I am not using a bread machine). 


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Relevance of bread machine yeast vs active dry yeast
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2006, 01:38:25 PM »
ihavezippers,

It's not easy to decipher the differences between the various forms of yeasts sold by the major yeast producers. Some develop strains of yeast specifically for bread machine use whereas others may suggest using instant dry yeast for bread machine applications. Then there are so-called "rapid-rise" and "quick-rise" versions for really quick dough-rising recipes, as opposed to those that require long fermentation times. SAF, a major producer, even has a "Perfect Rise" yeast that can be used for everything, including both oven and bread machine applications. It can get pretty confusing, and not much is done by the yeast producers to enlighten users as to the differences. Their approach is to say that all yeast will work for all applications so long as the users follow the right directions, either theirs or those of manufacturers of bread machines.

As for the difference between Fleischmann's bread machine yeast and active dry yeast, here is what Fleischmann's itself says at the FAQ section of its website:

What is the difference between fast-rising yeast (RapidRise/Bread Machine Yeast) and Active Dry Yeast?
RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast are different strains than Active Dry Yeast. RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast are grown with a higher level of nutrients and are dried to lower moisture content. The particle size of RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast are finely granulated to allow complete hydration of the yeast cells during the mixing process. The Active Dry Yeast larger particle size should be dissolved in water to achieve complete hydration prior to adding to the mixer. In addition, RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast contain ascorbic acid resulting in increased loaf volumes.


I would treat the Fleischmann's bread machine yeast as I would instant dry yeast.

Peter


Offline ihavezippers

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Re: Relevance of bread machine yeast vs active dry yeast
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2006, 04:46:10 PM »
I think there is a difference.  I used my "bread machine yeast" for the first time this weekend, after using the regualr dry active yeast with my Pendelton's Hi Gluten flour the two weeks prior...this weekend's pizza really wasn't that good.  The dough never really "rose" in the refridgerator, and lacked the fantastic crust taste results of the first two weekends...the only difference this past weekend in my preparation/ingredients was the use of the bread machine yeast over the active dry yeast.
This is far from scientifcally proven, but just a head's up to anyone who might encounter the same problem.   :'(
« Last Edit: February 07, 2006, 04:48:55 PM by ihavezippers »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Relevance of bread machine yeast vs active dry yeast
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2006, 03:57:01 PM »
ihavezippers,

I am puzzled by your results. There is a difference between bread machine yeast and active dry yeast, but little difference for all practical purposes between bread machine yeast and instant dry yeast. Bread machine yeast and instant dry yeast can be combined directly with the flour, whereas active dry yeast requires proofing in a warm liquid.

Depending on the recipe or formulation one might use, the dough may or may not rise that much during refrigeration. If it is a low-yeast, cold fermented dough, you might not see much rising of the dough until somewhere between the second and third day. But, even after a day or so the dough should be usable after letting the dough warm up for a reasonable period before using to make a pizza. If your dough temperature going into the refrigerator was on the low side to begin with (e.g., as a result of using cold water), or your refrigerator operates on the cold side, or your room temperature was on the cool side, any one of these factors could have affected the rising of the dough. But I don't think it was the bread machine yeast that was the villain, especially if it was viable and not improperly used. 

Peter

Offline ihavezippers

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Re: Relevance of bread machine yeast vs active dry yeast
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2006, 07:39:37 PM »
I noticed you metioned Instant Dry Yeast...I have never used this.  I don't know if that helps, but my two weeks of crust splendor came from using Active Dry Yeast.  When it ran out, I bought the Bread Machine Yeast by mistake becasue of the Fleischman's name (as I have seen it routinely heralded on the board).  My refridegerator might be on a colder setting than normal...but the water temperature I use when initially forming the dough is very warm, and I have not changed that water termperature since my successsfull crusts.

Hopefully tonight will work out better.  Wednesday, I was very adamant about preciseness in measuring of ingredients and correct procedure.
It is not that last week's crust was awlful; just not fantastic, like I had grown accustomed to the two weeks prior.


 

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