Author Topic: Last (good) pizza for a while  (Read 2073 times)

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Offline wahoo88

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Last (good) pizza for a while
« on: August 18, 2013, 08:33:36 PM »
As an incoming college freshman, I won't have any place to make pizza until winter break when I am back home.  Starting at the end of my senior year in high school, I began to experiment with pizza making.  Over the course of the summer, I have drastically improved my pies, although they still have a long way to come. This post is as much a documentation of my ingredients, workflow, and results for when I can return to my hobby as it is for forum discussion.  I have made lots of pizzas, but I've never had enough down-time during assembly and baking to photograph my entire process. This being my last batch this summer, I plan to fully document today's pies.

Dough: In my previous batch, I used this dough formulation:

Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
ADY (.5%):
Salt (2%):
Oil (1%):
Sugar (1%):
Total (164.5%):
Single Ball:
636.19 g  |  22.44 oz | 1.4 lbs
381.72 g  |  13.46 oz | 0.84 lbs
3.18 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.84 tsp | 0.28 tbsp
12.72 g | 0.45 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.65 tsp | 0.88 tbsp
6.36 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.41 tsp | 0.47 tbsp
6.36 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.6 tsp | 0.53 tbsp
1046.54 g | 36.91 oz | 2.31 lbs | TF = 0.0816
261.63 g | 9.23 oz | 0.58 lbs

This dough worked well for me in terms of flavor, extensibility, and crumb structure.  However, I wanted to directly observe the differences in tenderness, browning, and flavor associated with adding more or less fat and sugar.  In this batch, I made two separate doughs, with one having 1.5% oil and 1.5% sugar and the other containing 0.5% oil and 0.5% sugar.  The hydration, salt, and yeast percentages remained constant at 60, 2, and 0.5 percent respectively.  I chose to group sugar and fat together (not change each one individually) in order to see the broad differences in an almost lean dough as opposed to a richer dough.

1.5% Dough:

Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
ADY (.5%):
Salt (2%):
Oil (1.5%):
Sugar (1.5%):
Total (165.5%):
Single Ball:
316.18 g  |  11.15 oz | 0.7 lbs
189.71 g  |  6.69 oz | 0.42 lbs
1.58 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.42 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
6.32 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.32 tsp | 0.44 tbsp
4.74 g | 0.17 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.05 tsp | 0.35 tbsp
4.74 g | 0.17 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.19 tsp | 0.4 tbsp
523.27 g | 18.46 oz | 1.15 lbs | TF = 0.0816
261.63 g | 9.23 oz | 0.58 lbs

0.5% Dough:

Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
ADY (.5%):
Salt (2%):
Oil (.5%):
Sugar (.5%):
Total (163.5%):
Single Ball:
320.04 g  |  11.29 oz | 0.71 lbs
192.03 g  |  6.77 oz | 0.42 lbs
1.6 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.42 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
6.4 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.33 tsp | 0.44 tbsp
1.6 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.36 tsp | 0.12 tbsp
1.6 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.4 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
523.27 g | 18.46 oz | 1.15 lbs | TF = 0.0816
261.63 g | 9.23 oz | 0.58 lbs

Making the dough:

The two doughs were made with the same technique. The flour used was 100% KABF.  Yeast was Red Star ADY.  Water was unfiltered tap water.  Oil was Extra Light Olive Oil.

All of the yeast was proofed in a bowl with an amount of hot tap water for 10 minutes such that the remaining water totaled 100g.  For example, in the 1.5% dough, since water was 190g, I proofed the yeast in 90g hot water.  Since the two recipes differed in water weight by only 2g, I supposed the difference in final dough temperatures would be negligible.

Flour, salt, and sugar were mixed in a separate bowl.

The rest of the water was added at room temperature.  The dry ingredients were then mixed into the water/yeast mixture with a wooden spatula until the dough could be kneaded by hand.  The dough was then hand kneaded for about 3 minutes, at which point the oil was added.  I continued kneading the dough for about 8 minutes or until the surface was relatively free of large bumps and had a satiny sheen.  The dough was then placed into a plastic container and bulk fermented in the refrigerator for 24 hours.

The dough was then scaled into the appropriate weight, balled, and placed into plastic containers lightly greased with vegetable oil.  The dough then fermented in the refrigerator for 24 hours.

The dough balls underwent a reball after this second 24 hour fermentation period.  They were placed immediately back into the refrigerator with about 30 hours until baking was to happen.

With about 12 hours to baking, the dough balls were placed on the counter (~70 degrees F) for about 45 minutes and then returned to the refrigerator.  This step was not taken in previous batches, but someone in my family recently adjusted the refrigerator temperature.  I thought that the dough balls were fermenting very slowly compared to other batches. 

With 3 hours remaining before baking, the dough balls were removed from the refrigerator and placed on the counter.

Sauce:

The sauce was a lightly cooked variety. 
For one 28 oz. can of tomatoes:
1/2 tsp. butter
1 clove garlic
1/8 medium onion
pinch red pepper flakes
1/4 tsp. dried oregano
Salt

I sauteed the garlic and onion in the butter over medium heat until the onion was soft.  I added the can of Cento San Marzanos (whole, imported, non-DOP, with basil leaf) and used an immersion blender to blend until no large chinks remained.  I added the pepper flakes and oregano before salting to taste.  I simmered the sauce for about 10 minutes before returning the sauce to the tomato can for use.

Baking:

As it is the summer and I don't have any better options, I baked my pizzas on the grill. I have two cheap 13'' stones, so I place one stone on the center of the grill while the other is cantilevered over the  lower stone with a brick as a counterweight.  The pizzas are cooked on the lower stone.  The upper stone is preheated next to the lower stone in an effort to pack as much energy in it as possible.  If I had to guess, I would say that lower stone temperature during baking is about 550F and air temperature is about 500F on average.  The air temperature fluctuates drastically as I open and close the grill to check on the pies.  I try to minimize the time for which the grill is open.  I also give the stones about 2 minutes of recovery time between bakes.  The bake times are about 7 minutes.

The Pies:

1. 1.5% Oil/Sugar, mushrooms marinated in oregano and vinegar, provolone, parmesan
2. 0.5% Oil/Sugar, mozzarella, parmesan, basil (sauce on top)
3. 1.5% Oil/Sugar, mozzarella, provolone, basil
4. 0.5% Oil/Sugar, mozzarella, basil

To be honest, I could not notice much of a difference between the two doughs.  I could taste a small amount of sweetness in the 1.5% dough that wasn't present in the 0.5% dough, but I really had to try.  Since my baking environment is far from constant, any differences in dough browning are probably overshadowed by different baking temperatures.  The pizza was very tasty. I will note any reheating differences and photograph crumb shots on Tuesday.

Pictures to follow:


Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2013, 08:35:12 PM »
pictures:

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2013, 08:38:07 PM »
pictures:

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2013, 08:40:19 PM »
pictures:

Offline pythonic

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2013, 07:57:45 AM »
Very nice write up.  All the pies look really good.  I have yet to try my grill for bakes but will have to soon after seeing your setup.  Do you prefer the part skim vs the whole milk trader joes mozzarella?

Nate
« Last Edit: August 19, 2013, 09:23:38 AM by pythonic »
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2013, 04:15:04 PM »
Pythonic, thanks for the kind words.  The only reason that I used Part Skim TJ mozzarella was that I don't go shopping and my mother believes that everything is better low-fat  :(.  I thought I had explained this melting thing to her before...  Regardless, the cheese had good stretch and flavor compared to the fresh stuff I used to use, but I cannot comment on likeness to the TJ WM mozz.

Offline mkevenson

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2013, 05:38:55 PM »
Nice looking pies! You are definitely on your way. I appreciate your attention to detail.


Can you not take your grill to school with you? Make some friends in the kitchen or even a part time job there.
Who knows you might be cooking professionally one day.


Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2013, 09:57:01 AM »
mkenenson, thanks for the comment.  Maybe I will try and find myself a way to bake at school after a semester or two, but I can't see myself having the time or energy when I'm just  getting used to living away.

Offline JD

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2013, 10:34:54 AM »
You're very methodical & organized in your experiments. I'd bet you are going to school for some type of Engineering, or other Science based field? This type of organization will be very helpful for your career once you graduate, oh and you'll continue to make great pizza too. Hope to see you back in the winter, good luck.
Josh

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2013, 11:35:59 AM »
JD, engineering. :-D


Offline JD

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2013, 11:43:11 AM »
JD, engineering. :-D

 Not surprising, from a fellow Engineering Alumni (Mechanical). Good luck and have fun, you'll be shocked how fast these 4 years will go by. 



Josh

Offline deb415611

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2013, 12:09:29 PM »
very nice wahoo.  where are you going to school?   My son goes to UMBC

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2013, 05:37:19 PM »
JD, I'm studying to go mechanical as well.

Deb, I'm going to Virginia. My username is a reference to the unofficial school mascot, not that I expected anyone to notice.  I would have considered UMBC if I was good at Comp Sci.

Offline deb415611

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2013, 05:57:44 PM »
JD, I'm studying to go mechanical as well.

Deb, I'm going to Virginia. My username is a reference to the unofficial school mascot, not that I expected anyone to notice.  I would have considered UMBC if I was good at Comp Sci.

Comp Sci was my son's original major and that's why he went there along with the fact that a bunch of his online gaming buddies were there. Good luck with school! 

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #14 on: August 20, 2013, 09:46:50 PM »
Thanks Deb, I appreciate it.

Offline RockyMountainPie

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2013, 11:56:29 PM »
Wahoo,

Great looking pizzas!  Love your organization and attention to detail.  You're way ahead of most of here.  When I was 18, the only thing I knew about pizza was that I liked to eat it.  ;D

Work hard and roll with the punches.

--Tim

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2013, 09:12:52 AM »
I don't know enough about pizza to comment,  but my experience in aerospace tells me you're gonna do fine in engineering.  ;D

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2013, 09:48:12 AM »
Tim, I always have had a mild interest in baking, especially yeasted doughs.  Ultimately, though, I started making pizza because I really just love to eat it. Sometimes I wish that I had a more discerning palate like some of you to detect subtle flavor changes, but even my worst attempts taste good to me. 

Bbqchuck, mechanical and aerospace are very closely tied at UVa, so who knows where I could end up.  ;)

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2013, 09:35:53 PM »
Back from college again on break and managed to fit in a bake before Thanksgiving leftovers become dinner.  Since I only got back yesterday, I had to switch to a 1 day ferment. I used Craig's Baker's Yeast Chart with values of 62F and 23 hours to arrive at 0.06% ADY. When making the dough, instead of adding all of the flour at once, I mixed it in little by little.  This method was taught to me by Sharlene (CopperTop) and it is, I believe, a Neapolitan technique. Oddly enough, the dough felt to be the right texture before all of the flour was added (~30g) and so my actual dough weight was slightly less than the formula suggests. This leads me to believe that the hydration of the flour is better when using this mixing protocol.  From now on, I may use this mixing technique combined with a higher intended hydration given that the final product was very good.  I will post more about the fermentation results on Craig's BY Prediction Model thread, but I liked the flavor of the room temperature fermentation. The second pie was a nod to NJ boardwalk pizzas, even though I know that sharp cheddar is not used.

The two pies (more on that later) were
1. parmesan, WM LM mozzarella, pepperoni, sauce
2. WM LM mozzarella, sharp cheddar, sauce

I only photographed the first two pizzas. When the third pie was baking, the oven started beeping and threatened to lock the door, thinking that it was on self-clean mode, which it was not.  It had been at 520F for about an hour prior to the problem occurring. The third and the last pies had to be cooked on a cold grill and did not turn out very well.

KABF used.
Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
ADY (0.06%):
Salt (2%):
Sugar (2%):
Total (164.06%):
Single Ball:
631.65 g  |  22.28 oz | 1.39 lbs
378.99 g  |  13.37 oz | 0.84 lbs
0.38 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.1 tsp | 0.03 tbsp
12.63 g | 0.45 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.63 tsp | 0.88 tbsp
12.63 g | 0.45 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.17 tsp | 1.06 tbsp
1036.28 g | 36.55 oz | 2.28 lbs | TF = 0.0808
259.07 g | 9.14 oz | 0.57 lbs

Dan
 

Offline wahoo88

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Re: Last (good) pizza for a while
« Reply #19 on: May 18, 2014, 11:48:28 AM »
I just got back from school for the summer and am going to try to post all of my bakes this summer.  It is easy to tell yourself that you're going to post everything, but when you are in the heat of battle making pies, it's easy to forget to take photos. 

First up is a greek-style pizza baked in a new 15'' straight-sided aluminum pan. The dough was fermented overnight but had to be carefully monitored and occasionally placed in the freezer for a few minutes at a time because my refrigerator was not working properly.  This is the same dough I use for NY style pizza on a stone (formula in photos below, actual TF was .12).  The dough was proofed in the pan for about 2 hours prior to baking, and the Tuttorosso crushed tomato sauce (straight from the can) was applied in dollops.  The cheeses were WMLM mozz and parmesan with sharp cheddar placed around the edges.  The pizza was difficult to release from the pan, which can be attributed to virtually unseasoned aluminum.  To grease the pan, I used an extremely thin layer of butter with additional EVOO for flavor.  I find that when using only liquid fats, by the time the dough is ready to be baked, the oil has pooled in certain locations and makes de-panning more difficult.

The finished pizza was very good.  The crumb was extremely light and airy, almost too much so, and had good flavor from the overnight fermentation.  The fried cheddar around the edges was our favorite part of the pie.  The Tuttorosso crushed tomatoes have a rather cooked flavor which lended itself well to this style of pizza.  I would not use these tomatoes on a pie where bright acidity is desired, though.  Instead of shredding the mozzarella, I simply diced it, and this caused the mozz not to break down and bubble.  I prefer a mozz that has just barely broken down.

Next time,  I will top the pizza in a more traditional fashion and also try to stretch the pie more evenly in the pan; you can see the wedge-shaped profile of this attempt.


 

pizzapan