Author Topic: flour and yeast question  (Read 3841 times)

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Offline atlgirl

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flour and yeast question
« on: February 20, 2006, 04:23:59 PM »
I just found your site today, and was thrilled!  I, along with my husband and three children are pizza lovers.  We just had an outdoor italian clay pizza oven installed since we felt we could not get the best results with our home oven.  What a difference it makes! I do not know how I lived without one.  I am new to making pizza at home and have been trying numerous recipes to get the perfect crust.  While in Italy last year we fell in love with their pizza and I have been trying to get the same crust as in Naples.  I just tried a recipe with "00"  flour from Italy, but it called for 1 oz of fresh yeast which I can not find anywhere.  I am having trouble figuring out what the dry active yeast amount would be to replace the fresh yeast.  If anyone could help I would appreciate it.




Offline Pete-zza

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Re: flour and yeast question
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2006, 04:48:54 PM »
atlgirl,

To convert cake (fresh) yeast to active dry yeast (ADY), the usual recommendation is to use half the amount of the cake yeast by weight. So, for example, for a typical 0.6 oz. of cake yeast in one of those little cubes in the supermarket, you would use 0.3 ounces of ADY. On a volume basis, 0.3 ounces of ADY would be 2 1/4 t. In your specific example of 1 oz. of fresh yeast, you would use 0.5 oz. of ADY, or 3 3/4 t.

For an accurate conversion table, go to http://www.theartisan.net/MainCommFrm.htm, and click on the Yeast Conversions link at the bottom of the navigation table at the left.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 08, 2006, 12:32:53 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Lydia

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Re: flour and yeast question
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2006, 05:46:24 PM »
Peter

This is the info I have on yeast. Please comment if you find an error.

How Much Yeast Does An Envelope (or packet) of Yeast Contain? (USA)
1 envelope or packet of Active Dry Yeast, Instant Yeast, Rapid Rise Yeast, Fast Rising Yeast or Bread Machine Yeast weighs 1/4 ounce or 7 grams which equals 2 1/4 teaspoons (11 mL).

Yeast Substitution Guide:
One (0.6 ounce) cube of Fresh Compressed/Cake Yeast equals 1 envelope (or packet) of Active Dry Yeast, Instant Yeast, Rapid Rise Yeast, Fast Rising or Bread Machine Yeast, which equals 2 1/4 teaspoons or 7 grams (11 mL).

If a recipe calls for 1 envelope (or packet) of Active Dry Yeast, Instant Yeast, Rapid Rise Yeast, Fast Rising Yeast or Bread Machine Yeast, then you would use 0.6 ounce Fresh Compressed/Cake Yeast.

2 ounces of Fresh Compressed/Cake Yeast equals a strip of 3 envelopes or packets (21 grams total), or 6 3/4 teaspoons approximately of Active Dry Yeast or Instant Yeast.

Shelf life of Compressed/Cake Yeast
Compressed/Cake Yeast only has a shelf life of 4 to 6 weeks. It is highly perishable. The "sell by" date on the package is the "expiration date" also.

Where to Buy Compressed/Cake Yeast
In the United States you can usually find Compressed/Cake Yeast in most large supermarkets in or near the dairy section of the store. It usually is packaged in 0.6 ounce cubes wrapped in silver foil. The most common brand found in supermarkets is Fleischmann's Yeast. It will be kept refrigerated. When you buy Compressed/Cake Yeast, take it home and refrigerate it right away, and use it by the "Sell By" date on the package. Compressed/Cake Yeast is highly perishable.

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The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: flour and yeast question
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2006, 09:12:16 PM »
Lydia,

My starting point with yeast is almost always with weight, which I usually end up converting to volumes because of the small amounts used. Hence, I have little reason or occasion to read what the yeast producers put on their yeast envelopes and little bottles. Since I use primarily instant dry yeast (IDY) and have been operating out of a one-pound bag for several years, I have even less reason to pay attention to yeast labels.

That said, I believe if you look at the information on yeast packages, no matter what is inside--ADY, IDY, bread machine, Rapid Rise, Quick Rise, etc.--the information is almost always the same. That is, 1 envelope = 1/4 oz. = 7 g. = 2 1/4 t.--which is what your first statement says.  Hodgson Mills is a little bit different from the others in that its ADY packets include 5/16 oz., or 8.75 g. Fleischmann's and SAF tend to correlate their dry yeasts with 0.6 oz. fresh yeast, whereas Red Star correlates with 2 oz. of fresh yeast, quite possibly because that may be their standard package size for fresh yeast. Red Star also correlates three 1/4 oz. packets with 2 oz. of fresh yeast. Fresh yeast is a moot issue with me in any event because no one around me sells it anymore.

What is significant is that the yeast producers do not correlate ADY with IDY for their consumer markets. I suspect this is done because the average consumer does not want to be bothered with doing mathematical conversions to determine how to convert from one form of yeast to another, and in small quantities it may not matter if the amounts are off a bit. Similar parallels exist between the amounts of regular salt and Kosher salt to use. None of this has ever been an impediment for me. I have memorized that to convert from fresh yeast to ADY, I use one half of the weight of the fresh yeast, and to convert from fresh yeast to IDY, I use one third of the weight of the fresh yeast. These conversions are not absolutely precise and it is for this reason that I often refer readers to the yeast conversion table at theartisan.net, which I understand to be exact. Once I have the weights of either ADY or IDY, I use simple conversion data to convert the weights to volumes. Using this approach, I will not get the same results as I would by following the conversion data on the consumer yeast packaging materials you referenced in your various statements. Working with weights and baker's percents as I do, I guess I've trained myself to think more like a baker than anything else.

So, Lydia, I can't tell you that your statements are incorrect. I am just following a different system that I suspect has its origins in the professional ranks of bakers, where the distinctions between the different kinds of yeast, especially in the batch sizes and quantities that they use, have greater relevance.

As far as shelf life of fresh yeast is concerned, it's moot for me at the moment since I can't find it even if I wanted it, which I don't, and I tend to be somewhat suspicious in any event of manufacturers' "use by" or "sell by" dates. It is true that one should keep the yeast refrigerated when not actually being used, and it should be used within a reasonable time because it is highly perishable. I suspect that one can use fresh yeast for a reasonable period of its "sell date" since otherwise one would be buying essentially dead yeast. Most instructions caution against freezing fresh yeast, but I have done so and found the yeast still viable when I later defrosted it and used it.

Peter


Offline Lydia

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Re: flour and yeast question
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2006, 10:37:21 PM »
Good GRAVY! no-wonder I'm confused.
It sounds as though the strength of the brands varies.


In general I have had poor performance from fresh yeast. I suspect that they were mishandled (stored at improper temperatures) at sometime between the shipping and stocking the product.

And most often the fresh yeast I find, is already past it's sell by date  ::)

So I have stopped using it completely.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.