Author Topic: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started  (Read 10575 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #20 on: August 29, 2013, 08:38:14 AM »
Chuck,

I am curious about what exact type of pizza you are trying to make.  In your screen name you have part of it that says tomato pies.  Is that a type of pizza you might want to make, or do you just like tomato pies?  If it is that is a type of pizza you would like to make I have been working for a long while on tomato pies with many iterations.  I own a small pizza business at our local farmers markets.  I have made many types of pizzas that do have what I think is flavor in the crust, air pockets and a slight crunch on the bottom crust.  I also have made many iterations of Sicilian pizzas.  Do you want to use your same dough to make your Sicilian pizzas? 

Do you understand how to use the Expanded Dough Calculation Tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html  The Lehmann dough calculation tool is also good for a NY style pizza.  http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_calculator.html  I don't make as big as batches of dough like you are going to do because my Hobart mixer is only a 20 qt.

I am using All Trumps flour now for what I call my boardwalk style of pizzas, but I have used many other flours before.  For my Detroit style pizzas, which are really a Sicilian pizza, but with a fairly high hydration I am using the Occident flour.  I can link you to where I made different pizzas.  In no way am I saying my pizzas are the best.  It is a learning process and I am constantly learning here on the forum what all goes into making the best type of pizza I can.

Norma
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Offline Cettastomatopies

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #21 on: August 29, 2013, 10:43:56 AM »
Hey Norma,
            I'm kind of a fan of yours following you throughout the forum.
You seem to have alot of expertise and experience and most of all "the love of pizza"!!
Thank you for contacting me.
Well, I enjoy all kinds of pizza and Italian food. I grew up in Staten Island and was surrounded by mob run pizzerias. But they were real good I have to say. Since moving to new Jersey 15 years ago, I noticed that new jersey pizza was very different from New York in texture and taste.
many Brooklyn and New York "transplants" have brought there recipes and business here.
So Italian food has gotten much better.
I am told by family members in Robbinsville/Hamilton area about the original Trenton style Tomato pies you are on a journey exploring them.
They are all great!! Some better than others of course.
I fell in love with the fresh simplicity of sauce used on these tomato pies.
From what I understand with Italian directly from Italy here, that's how they make it in Italy in addition to wood fired ovens.
So, hence I used my family name, i am still indecisive if I am going to be "Cettastomatopies" but thought of it as a user name in the forum.
I would love to meet with you some time. I am always learning and it brings me joy and makes me happy to cook, talk and do anything involving food. I was a cook in Princeton called "Eno Terra", its a four star rustic Italian restaurant owned by Italians called the "MOMO" group. I just resigned to expore my Pizza venture. I have been selling insurance at the same time for income and I own a cleaning service and small party rental business in which I would like to incorporate the "pizzeria" for catering the parties.
We shall see.
I recently purchased a "la caja china" for pig roasting rentals and the pig come out in 4 hours, juicy and crackling crispy! amazing!
thats another subject.
I just tried the  expanded dough calculation on Scott123's recipe for me, check it out and see what you think. i will be using 50 lb bags, probably All trumps.

(69) 20 oz Pizza Dough Ball Recipe

Flour (100%):    23021.65 g  |  812.05 oz | 50.75 lbs
Water (63.6%):    14641.77 g  |  516.46 oz | 32.28 lbs
IDY (0.56%):    128.92 g | 4.55 oz | 0.28 lbs | 14.27 tbsp | 0.89 cups
Salt (1.75%):    402.88 g | 14.21 oz | 0.89 lbs | 27.98 tbsp | 1.75 cups
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (2.98%):    686.05 g | 24.2 oz | 1.51 lbs | 50.35 tbsp | 3.15 cups
Sugar (1.05%):    241.73 g | 8.53 oz | 0.53 lbs | 20.21 tbsp | 1.26 cups
Total (169.94%):   39123 g | 1380 oz | 86.25 lbs | TF = N/A
Single Ball:   567 g | 20 oz | 1.25 lbs


Can't wait to get my hands in to find results.
Any criticism on recipe. I have no idea as you see.
Talk soon
and Thanks for reaching out, as I said to Walter, Scott and Chaze, its always good to make new friends!
Chuck

Offline norma427

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #22 on: August 29, 2013, 11:30:37 AM »
Chuck,

I would be glad to talk to you.  You can PM me if you want. 

Thanks for telling me more about you and your experiences. 

Do you have any other information about what family members told you about the Robbinsville/De Lorenzo's pizzas that you can share?  I agree that some of the Trenton Tomato Pies are better than others.

Your dough formulation looks fine to me.  Maybe other members that are more experienced them I am will post about it more than I can.  I have found that using that amount of IDY for a one day cold ferment was too much for me though.  Do you have a mixing method down yet?  What kind of flour are you going to try first?  One thing to keep in mind is sometimes a whole big bag of flour might not weigh the same. 

Best of luck! 

Norma
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Offline waltertore

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #23 on: August 30, 2013, 04:06:33 PM »
Chuck: We use 62-63% water.  The dough is a bit more difficult to work when it gets well warmed up but I like the crust that way.  I agree with Norma that the yeast amount is pretty high. We use closer to 1/3 cup. I don't use any oil or sugar.  Our ovens, blodgett 1000's do a great job of browning evenly and I bet your Bakers Prides will as well. I look forward to hearing what you think of your dough.  What flour are you using?  We use either all trumps or full strenght.  Both are great IMO.   Walter "still proud to be a Jersey boy" :-D

http://soreservoir.com/history.html

one of our cheese pies
« Last Edit: August 30, 2013, 04:43:55 PM by waltertore »

Offline Cettastomatopies

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #24 on: September 01, 2013, 10:29:16 AM »
Walter,
               Those photos are great, especially your crust!
I know I have to play with the recipe.
Hey, it seems that most pizza establishments who I have been able to get info from are all using all trumps.
What is your opinion on Bromated vs unbromated?
Is the "All Trumps" bromated or unbromated?
This whole cancer talk is something I don't want to get involved with.
But from my understanding, Bromated gives so much better results.
What do you think?, I'm new on the subject.
I don't want to poison myself, family and my customers?
also, Im looking at a new site closer to home, the owner has Blodgetts, will find out what model.
Talk soon!
Chuck
 

Offline waltertore

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #25 on: September 01, 2013, 10:47:39 AM »
Walter,
               Those photos are great, especially your crust!
I know I have to play with the recipe.
Hey, it seems that most pizza establishments who I have been able to get info from are all using all trumps.
What is your opinion on Bromated vs unbromated?
Is the "All Trumps" bromated or unbromated?
This whole cancer talk is something I don't want to get involved with.
But from my understanding, Bromated gives so much better results.
What do you think?, I'm new on the subject.
I don't want to poison myself, family and my customers?
also, Im looking at a new site closer to home, the owner has Blodgetts, will find out what model.
Talk soon!
Chuck

Hi Chuck:  Thanks!  For me the crust is the focus of a pie and the other stuff should compliment it.   Those pizzas were made by a cognitively delayed student in my class.   She is the best pizza maker in central Ohio!  I ran my recipe through the dough calculator and here it is.  I use the bromated flour.  I am not very versed on the health issues.  I figure I have been eating pizza all my life along with millions of other NYC area people and if I die a year sooner from it that is fine with me.  Seriously, I have read on this forum that bromate is used in drinking water and burns off when baked  but for some reason CA has banned it in flour.    Blodgett makes a lot of deck ovens and some are much better than others.  Also the older ones had stones that contain asbestos and are much better at heat retention and dispersion than the new ones.   Mine are about 40 years old and work like new.  Walter

we mix with cool to cold water.  Lately our kitchen has been running around 85 degrees and humid so I use approx 45-50 degree water cooled with ice cubes.  When winter comes the water comes out of the tap much colder.  Now it coming out around 75 degrees.  We mix for about 8 minutes, ball and refrigerate for 24- 72 hours, remove for at least 2 hours before use.  In the winter I up the water a bit because it is so dry in the kitchen with the forced air heat.

this  makes 10 -16oz dough balls and end up being about a 17-18" pie.  Picture of our blodgett 1000 ovens

Flour (100%):    2759.96 g  |  97.35 oz | 6.08 lbs
Water (62%):    1711.18 g  |  60.36 oz | 3.77 lbs
IDY (.35%):    9.66 g | 0.34 oz | 0.02 lbs | 3.21 tsp | 1.07 tbsp
Salt (2%):    55.2 g | 1.95 oz | 0.12 lbs | 9.89 tsp | 3.3 tbsp
Total (164.35%):   4536 g | 160 oz | 10 lbs | TF = N/A
Single Ball:   453.6 g | 16 oz | 1 lbs
« Last Edit: September 01, 2013, 03:42:58 PM by waltertore »

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #26 on: September 01, 2013, 03:44:59 PM »
Seriously, I have read on this forum that bromate is used in drinking water and burns off when baked  but for some reason CA has banned it in flour.

Walter your assessment that bromate, in the quantities found in pizza, is harmless, is on the money, but, just to clarify, bromate isn't used in drinking water, it occurs naturally in drinking water- in about the same quantities (parts per billion) that ends up in a baked pizza. And this naturally occurring bromate in water occurs everywhere, including bottled water and including California.

Chuck, a lot of foods will kill you- if you consume enough of them.  Salt, in large amounts, will kill you.  The World Health Organization classifies bromate as a 'possible' carcinogen.  Constituents of cocoa, nutmeg, cinnamon, black pepper, coffee and tea have the same classification, but, like bromate, the quantity of carcinogenic compounds ingested are so infinitesimally small that they're completely harmless. Can you imagine black pepper or chocolate being effectively banned in California? It would be ridiculous.  That's exactly how ridiculous California's approach to bromate is.

Offline waltertore

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #27 on: September 01, 2013, 03:55:15 PM »
Scott:  Thanks for the clarification and putting it in perspective.  I lived in Sonoma County CA for 15 years.  We left there 6 years ago to move to OH.  The main reasons were to simplify our financial burden, get away from the crime ridden area we had to live in (all we could afford at 275k for a 800 sq ft 2bdrm house), a failing infastructure with the schools, and to have more creative freedom with how I teach special educuation.   I had a small, non licensed, version going on in CA but could never get it to the level I am at now due to the fear of lawsuits, regulations, and in general just too much work for a sure to be doomed venture before it started.  I had members of The Bohemiem Club ready to donate a bakery in Santa Rosa to my school district so I could do my thing.  It was located in a well respected area next to a high traffic grocery store.  They would also pay all the bills on it for 5 years so in essence it was free gift.  My district declined citing too many hurdles to overcome to make it happen.  The red tape to do anything in CA is insane.  My friend was going to build a new house but didn't because the building permits alone were over 100k and this was no mansion.  Amys foods is out of Petaluma.  I heard they wanted to expand but the costs to do it were so extreme they are going to move to another state.  CA is a lovely place but it is a mess to be in unless one is finacially set beyond most of what most people can pull off.  I have so many friends back there that struggle day to day to stay there and they are doctors, lawyers, teachers.  My doctor could not fill an open doctor position in his office because the pay did not offset the cost of living. My wife and I netted about 80k a year and had a $2,700/month mortgage.  We were always stressing out on bills and fell into credit card debt to keep up.  Now we live in peace and quiet with a $400/month mortgage  and net about 90k/year.  Anyway, I miss California a lot but could never pull of what I am now doing there. That is funny because most in CA feel themselves cutting edge progressive............    Walter
« Last Edit: September 01, 2013, 04:07:01 PM by waltertore »

Offline PizzaNJ

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #28 on: September 01, 2013, 06:07:38 PM »
Please let us know when the grand re-opening is... It'd be cool to see someone in business that was inspired/influenced by the forum.

The pig roasting will be cool too.

(Maybe you could be convinced to sell us some All Trumps on the side as well...)

Offline Cettastomatopies

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2013, 01:28:50 AM »
Walter, Scott, and Hey Pizza NJ,
                                        I gotta say, you guys are great!!! I don't know if Pizza NJ is a guy or a girl? LOL Either way your one of the guys.
Thanks for all your help!! Scott you are so right, my cleaning company has a major trucking account with 16,500 drivers, Ive had it for the past 15 years, Long story short, These chemical hauling drivers have become very good friends over the years and they tell me all the time of what they deliver to put in chicken feed and water treatment plants, they tell me that you would never eat chicken again or drink municipal water after seeing what they pump out.
 I was concerned that if I put out a delicious pie, that i was not harming anyone.
Then I thought and had a conversation with relatives from this holiday weekend concerning the bromated flour. It dawned that growing up in Staten Island (the worlds largest garbage dump of an island, look it up (Guinness book of records), I have been eating years of delicious, crispy, perfectly cooked Italian bread on sundays with pasta, bakery items from generations of Italian immigrants, pastries to die for, bagels you really never had so good in any other state and yes, tons of pizzerias who all made excellent pizza pies past down from generation to generation and I'm sure they were and still are all using Bromated Flour and getting the best results and I consumed 28 years then including polluted air from the dump (excessive retardation and defects in children living close to the dump).
Sooo, Scott has a very valid point. All of you and I da.. well know that our government allows so much of this in our foods which results in cancer, etc.

Walter, California is cool, but as you experienced is tough. My wife has a cousin who is a television star, ("turtle" from HBO "entourage", now canceled), Jerry Ferrara, really nice kid when I met him, cousin Jerry went out there with nothing, struggled, looking for a dream as an actor, met Mark Wahlberg, starred in a hit cable show became a millionaire, and the rest is history.
Now, my brother in law went out there with a dream to pursue IT. He lasted one year because it was so expensive to live there.
California is not easy and most people have a tough there. Not everyone is as fortunate as "Jerry".

Walter, those are great photos, that "Blodgett" looks like the pair I am trying to inherit now if I get this new deal close to home.
How many pies can you make total?
Crazy idea I had recently, thinking of roasting a "pig " in the la caja china rental I have and making a "pulled pork Pizza"?
Yeah or Neh?? Would customers like? Interesting idea.
On a funny note, if the pizzeria fails, I turn it either into a bbq or latin food joint! HAHA.
NP Pizza NJ, I will keep in touch when the a deal closes. Trouble is, everyone selling thinks they have a goldmine!

Scott, I read some old forums on your history with KA. I've had many bread loaves fail from there KA bread flour. And same recipe, success with Gold medal AP. I do not buy there flour anymore, overrated!
Did you hear or know about there "spring patent" flour? Is that to compete with the "spring king spring patent" brand????
Wonder if its any good?
Talk later gang!
Bye for now.
Chuck


 


Offline waltertore

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #30 on: September 02, 2013, 08:00:32 AM »
Chuck: My cousins wife is from SI and I use to go there regularly to the Mandolin Bros. music store.  I played full time around the world for 20 odd years.  A hollywood success story!  That is a rare thing. A blodgett 1000 can cook 4 18"-20" pies or 6 - 16" pies at a time.  They have one of if not the highest btu rating per sq inch of any deck oven.  I think Scott figured that out once here.  There are no electronics and a monkey wrench, screwdriver, and a some open end wrenches are all you need to service them.   Parts are still readily available as well.  I think they stopped making them in 1980.  Pulled pork pizza?  I am out of touch with the NJ palate.   Back when I was growing up (50's-70's) it would never go.  I visit every year or so and it seems each time I go back I see more crazy looking pies at most of the places so it probably would be a big hit.  I put some taylor ham on a pie last week and people loved it.   I think that would be a big seller in NJ and I know of no pizzeria doing it.  Have you tried GM Harvest King for bread?  I use it with great results.  Unfortunately the Restaurant Depot here has stopped carrying it and my Gordon Food Service rep says I have to buy 50-50 pound bags for them to order it.   We are small time with artisan breads and that amount would rot before we use it up.   Walter

here are 6-16-17" pies in the oven and some french loaves using Harvest King
« Last Edit: September 02, 2013, 08:10:57 AM by waltertore »

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #31 on: September 02, 2013, 09:25:53 AM »
Have you tried GM Harvest King for bread?  I use it with great results.  Unfortunately the Restaurant Depot here has stopped carrying it and my Gordon Food Service rep says I have to buy 50-50 pound bags for them to order it.   We are small time with artisan breads and that amount would rot before we use it up.   Walter

Walter, have you checked with RDP Foodservice on Oakland Park near Indianola (Clintonville)?

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #32 on: September 02, 2013, 09:36:26 AM »
NP Pizza NJ, I will keep in touch when the a deal closes. Trouble is, everyone selling thinks they have a goldmine!

Goldmines aren't for sale. Be very suspicious of anyone trying to sell a pizzeria.

Offline waltertore

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #33 on: September 02, 2013, 09:59:45 AM »
Walter, have you checked with RDP Foodservice on Oakland Park near Indianola (Clintonville)?

Ryan:  Thanks for that lead.  I will call them.  Walter

Offline Cettastomatopies

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #34 on: September 02, 2013, 12:05:16 PM »
Hey Walter and Ryan,
                   Walter those pics are great, NJ has lost most of any artisan el, back in the day bakeries with bread as beautiful as yours.
We now are faced with Wegmans and Panera. Too me growing up on Staten Island, I have a hard time with this. The old Italian, German or polish man behind the counter with that personal touch and bread recipes passed down from generations, now all commercial.

Keep rockin, that bread makes my mouth water!
I'm 43, Mandolin brothers I remember well. Being in music did you know any musicians in Staten Island (Lou or Al Mannarino, Ralph Azzara?)
Just checking.
Staten Island is now become little Russia. All the Russians from Brooklyn came over the verrazano bridge and the population exploded.
Its real congested now. I miss the great food it has tho.
Hey Walter, Pork roll, egg and cheese, "a jersey favorite"!
GM HK for bread good to know. If I can only get it to look as great as yours!!!
Thanks!
Chuck

Offline waltertore

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #35 on: September 02, 2013, 01:22:38 PM »
Chuck:  Thanks!  The artisan thing is dying everywhere I think.  Young people want things right now.  They don't understand the apprentenship thing that the old guys (and me luckily) learned under.   Luckily there will always be some young people driven to do it the right way but like you said Panera bread is the new model.   I hate their bread.  It looks good with their computerized steam ovens but lacks the touch of good stuff.  I use pans of water for steam in our blodgetts.  My mother is from Italy and I learned all this stuff from her and her family in the Newark area.  I often hated it as a kid- wanted to play with my friends - but instead was home making meatballs, sausage, cheese, breads, and such and or going down to Newark with my grandfather and helping him butcher meat.  He cured all his own stuff at home, made wine with grapes in the yard and cases off the Newark docks, had a still that he made his cordials.   We made everything from scratch.  My grandparents never owned a home.  They rented 2 family houses and always had a spare room for laying out pastas, curing meats, and the garage was a smoke house.  I was raised old school, and going on 60, now realize what a gift it was.  I don't reconize those musicians but I left pretty early on with Wilbert Harrison.  He had that big hit Kansas City in the 50's and Lets Work Together in the 60's.  I have led a colorful life people tell me.  To me it is normal.   Here is a link to my music bio, and about 5,000 of my songs.  I am the creator of Spontobeat.  I spontaneously create all my words and music as I go along and have no idea what will come out.  I had a lot of legends of rock and roll and blues in my band or I in theirs over the years.  When I based my band out Brussels for 2.5 years I became good friends with the bread baker on the corner.  His shop was great and he was French trained.  I ate many a taylor ham breakfast sandwiches when I did construction out of Carlstadt.    I bet that would be a big hit as a topping.  Pure NJ pride there.  Many in NYC never heard of taylor ham.  I guess all places change.  SI use to be a strange place to me just for the island effect and the layout.  I spent an afternoon last month with Anthony, the owner of Una Pizza in SF.  We hit it off with the 1 man show thing.  It is a lonely road we both concluded but the drive to do things superceedes that.  I wish we lived closer.   I really was impressed with his entire operation.   Walter

link to a streaming of my most current songs.  I record everything at once with drums on my feet, guitar, harp on a rack, vocals, in my studio on our property.  I went back to being a 1 man band after I quit playing full time and not living in a major music center.  It is good for less headaches.  I prefer to be a 1 man show with everything I do including pizza/baking.  It makes for less problems.  Money doesn't drive me. My wife and I live very simple.  What drives me is doing meaningful work with these kids and the bakery/pizza angle has been a great match.  Luckily my special needs students and I groove perfectly most all the time. 

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137&content=widgets

my musical bio and such
 http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137

a great video interview with Anthony.  A true inspiration.

« Last Edit: September 02, 2013, 02:18:15 PM by waltertore »

Offline Auralnauts

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #36 on: September 02, 2013, 06:46:16 PM »
You know, I may not be an expert in this but I'm someone who is in the process of opening up a pizzeria in Colombia. I really don't see how you could go into opening a business blind. No matter how many recipes, or how much advice people give you here; you won't have their experience. So let me put what I'm saying in prospective. I'm a pizza maker, if I were to go into a 4 star Italian restaurant to be a cook with no prior experience on cooking Italian cuisine... I'd make a crappy product.

Now, we all start somewhere, but I don't think anyone here learned how to make pizza by buying a pizzeria. I personally think you should work for a pizzeria or learn from someone near you. No one can hand you experience virtually.

Best of lucks pal.
Dough, stretch, sauce, cheese; check.

Offline Cettastomatopies

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #37 on: September 06, 2013, 01:17:31 AM »
Auralnuts,
            Thanks for your concern.
Because I might be a bit short on a purchase right now (bank pulled the plug on my loan),
That has been stuck in my head. But, it's not like I've never been in a kitchen before.
I am considering working in a pizzeria near by to toss some skins.
Practice, practice, practice. And you know as we'll as I that everyday is a learning process.
I have been in biz for 19 years with the cleaning with a staff so it's not like I don't know or I never ran a biz before. This is a passion of mine and I won't stop till it succeeds!
That's called "dedication". All night long recipe trials and errors till its right.
Thanks for caring.
Chuck


scott123

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #38 on: September 06, 2013, 01:42:43 AM »
I am considering working in a pizzeria near by to toss some skins.

I wouldn't recommending learning how to stretch dough with someone else's dough, especially a dough that most likely isn't winning any awards. You really want to learn with your own dough.

I think, from a business perspective, you're more than qualified for this venture. If you've never made pizza before, though, then you've got work to do. One of the biggest traps that aspiring pizzamakers fall into is believing that pizza is relatively easy to make/quick to master and that, as long as you have a good recipe, things will sort themselves out.  Mediocre pizza is incredibly easy to make, but I wouldn't re-open an existing pizzeria, especially one in NJ, with mediocre pizza.  You want something truly top shelf, and, to do that, it takes time to master.  You can't just work with yeast, you have to understand yeast.  You can't just knead for x minutes, you have to understand gluten and everything that impacts it.  I've seen people get up to speed in as little as 3 months, but that was devoting most of their day to mastering pizza. Ideally, a think a year making pizzas at home would give most people a solid foundation.

I don't know how soon you plan on opening/re-opening, but, you can't start this process soon enough.  If you wait until you have a deck oven oven at your disposal, it will be too late.  You should be making pizza, at home, yesterday.

Offline La Sera

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Re: Commercial dough recipes to get a New Jersey pizzeria started
« Reply #39 on: September 06, 2013, 07:43:07 AM »
I appreciate good dough as much as anyone on this site -- a place full of people who appreciate quality pizza. However, as a pizza business owner, I'll say this:

La Sera's Pizza Business Rule #6:

An inexpensive, plain, slightly oily dough with delicious cheese and toppings will outsell expensive, delicious dough with cheap, plain toppings every day.



Dough is just a base for American-style pizza.

Dough is the pizza for Neapolitan and some other styles.

Any normally intelligent person can learn to make basic New York dough. It isn't rocket science. A great combination of topping flavors, the cooking process and oven handling take a little more thought and practice.

Knowing your way around a kitchen makes a product. Knowing how to market, manage and hire makes a business.

Good luck!