Author Topic: Neapolitan Pizza - Flour Mixing Questions - Peter Reinhart comment  (Read 1376 times)

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Offline mitchjg

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I was reading through American Pie and came across these statements:

"The DOC-approved pizzerias I visited in Naples each used their own blend of 00 flour mixed with a small amount of American bread flour. American all-purpose flour, which is actually a little stronger and more elastic than 00 flour, performs closest to this blend, but even then you may need to adjust the water amount depending on the brand."

I know that Reinhart is occasionally criticized in these forums but I figure he has significant knowledge and he did not make things up about his visits.  Do you think this means the pizzerias are using weaker 00 flours than Caputo and augmenting it to get close to the Caputo often used by folks here in pm.com?  Are the folks here being more purists (excessive?) than the folks in Naples?  etc?

I was thinking of mixing some KABF or KAAP with my 00 flour (maybe 33% /67%) to get more browning at a somewhat lower WFO temperature (I get my best results with 00 when I keep the floor over 825 -850) as an experiment. 

Can you folks comment on Reinhart's statements?




Offline scott123

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza - Flour Mixing Questions - Peter Reinhart comment
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2013, 12:34:16 PM »
It's probably a translation mixup. 00 flour is, itself, a blend of flour, containing American flour, specifically North American/Canadian flour.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2013, 01:54:17 PM by scott123 »

Offline sub

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza - Flour Mixing Questions - Peter Reinhart comment
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2013, 03:38:44 PM »
Small amount of Manitoba is used in summer when it's very hot.

Offline Prefessa

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza - Flour Mixing Questions - Peter Reinhart comment
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2013, 01:05:03 PM »
Clarification....The Term 00 Flour is a measure of extraction rate.

Whole Wheat flour is 100% Extraction because 100% of the wheat kernal is made in to flour.

So now you sift out the bran and wheat middlings....80% of the weight comes back as a tan colored flour....that is Tipo 1

So now you sift out all of the bran and germ....you wind up with 72% of the wheat kernal weight and that is Tipo-0 which is what american flours run.

So now you selectively mill the wheat kernal so you get nothing but endo sperm....you get less than 50% back....and that is Tipo 00 the purest isolation of the wheat endosperm.

So...in Europe.....There are MANY Type 00 flours....The given is the extraction rate....the STRENGTH is designated by the Alveograph spec known as W

So there are 00 flours that are as strong as ALL Trumps and indeed they call it Farina Manitoba generally you will see W ratings above 500...

When some one says they use 00 flour the next question I ask is...Which one??? Is ist a W240, a W310, a W410??? or Manintoba at W500.

Bakers use this flour to give  the flour more resistance to the effects of long fermentations.

Me....I only use flour for fresh Pasta...for Pizza Italy can keep there flour which can be predominately American Wheat anyway.


Try Gold Medal..."Better for Bread" also known as Harvest King...it behaves just like 00 flour, is unbleached, unbromated and just as slack as Caputo. Theoretically the extraction rate qualifys this as a Tipo 0 flour, but DOC specifies Tipo 0 or 00 or a mixture of both. This flour is 100% Hard Red WINTER wheat.

The difference here is the added Diastatic Malt(Malted Barley)....you get all the advantages of 00, but HK browns better and is more suited to long fermentations


Offline pizzaboyfan

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza - Flour Mixing Questions - Peter Reinhart comment
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2013, 01:12:13 PM »
It's probably a translation mixup. 00 flour is, itself, a blend of flour, containing American flour, specifically North American/Canadian flour.

How can Reinhart's comments be a translation mixup, when he writes in his native language, English ?

It's quite plausible that a small amount of AP is added for taste and browning.

Offline scott123

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Re: Neapolitan Pizza - Flour Mixing Questions - Peter Reinhart comment
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2013, 12:01:49 AM »
How can Reinhart's comments be a translation mixup, when he writes in his native language, English ?

When Peter visited the Neapolitan pizzerias and they told him about the flour they were using, it was either through a translator, or through an owner speaking imperfect English. All 00 pizzeria flour is a blend- blended by the miller. It would be incredibly easy for Peter to hear 'blend' and think the pizzeria is doing the blending rather than the miller.


 

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