Author Topic: Random NY pies  (Read 17517 times)

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Offline JD

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #160 on: April 06, 2014, 07:51:43 PM »
What brand cheese is that Johnny? Looks great
Josh


Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #161 on: April 06, 2014, 08:01:07 PM »
What brand cheese is that Johnny? Looks great


"Porto Alegre" whole milk mozz -It's a popular brand here in Minas Gerais state, stocked in all supermarkets.

http://www.laticiniosportoalegre.com.br/produto/queijo-mussarela-2/
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #162 on: April 23, 2014, 07:35:09 PM »
Something light tonight - an all veggie pie. Pie sauced with hand crushed Mutti brand tomatoes. Whole milk mozz,  red and green peppers, onions, mushrooms, garlic and some EVOO. Out of the oven, fresh basil. Pie smelled great, tasted great.
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #163 on: April 23, 2014, 07:45:16 PM »
And pie #2 - same dough, but this time I allowed the dough to come to room temp before baking.  As the first veggie pie above, this pie baked on a large cast iron griddle placed in the middle rack - preheated to 300 degrees celsius with both heating elements on.

Topped with hand crushed Mutti brand tomatoes, cubed whole milk mozz, sliced grape tomatoes, red and green bell peppers, onions, garlic and EVOO. Out of the oven a little dried oregano.

Veggie pizza night: Done. Next time may be a while, lol.
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #164 on: April 27, 2014, 08:04:10 PM »
Tonight's 2 pies:

First: 300 gm doughball opened to around 13.5", topped with pulsed Mutti tomatoes (seasoned with minced garlic, dried oregano, fresh basil, S&P, sugar & EVOO), whole milk mozz, diced red bell peppers, sliced sweet onions, and some sliced frankfurters.  Out of the oven I topped a couple slices with shoestring potatoes and another with parsley & chilli peppers.

Second: an approx 475 gm doughball opened to around 14.5". Pretty thick dough, IMHO :o. Sauce ladled over, then the mozz (hand sliced and chopped into 1/3" cubes. That's it. In the pic, you can make out some of the oregano and basil used for the sauce underneath the cheese.  Despite this pie being very thick, I liked the mouthfeel. Very soft, tender crumb.

Dough: 24 hour refrigerated autolyse - only flour & water. After, with a few drops of water I made a pasted with the fresh CY and spread over the dough, followed by stretch and folds. Next salt, more stretch and folds.  Last oil.  6 hour bulk fermentation in the fridge, then divided and balled, + 6 hours in the fridge + 3 hours on counter.

Formula:

100% AP flour (10% protein)
63% water
.6% CY
1.8% non-iodized salt
3.5% EVOO



Il miglior fabbro

Offline jsaras

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #165 on: April 27, 2014, 10:42:08 PM »
That's one of the most unusual dough prep instructions I've read on this site.  Is it your invention?
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #166 on: April 28, 2014, 11:23:22 PM »
That's one of the most unusual dough prep instructions I've read on this site.  Is it your invention?

The autolyse was intended to last only 12 hours, but life got in the way, thus 24.  While I didn't follow anybody's formula/recipe for this dough, I'm a bit reluctant to claim it as my invention - knowing there's nothing new under the big golden disk in the sky :)
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #167 on: May 05, 2014, 08:42:59 PM »
Baguette dough for Neo-NY pizza? For this dough I used a different formula (ice cold water, 48 hour poolish & blended flours), which can be seen in reply #15: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30821.0 Inspired by the "More flavor in dough" thread, I used ice cold water for the poolish.

Dough was a pleasure to open, felt "just right". Texture very nice - light, airy, crisp.  Topped with tomato sauce, whole milk mozz, onions, sliced tomatoes, green bell pepper, ham, pepperoni & chili flakes.

« Last Edit: May 05, 2014, 08:46:50 PM by Johnny the Gent »
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Offline norma427

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #168 on: May 05, 2014, 09:48:13 PM »
Johnny,

That is a very good looking Neo-NY or whatever you want to call it!  :chef: Maybe you invented a new style of pizza.  Your Baguettes look delicious too!

I tried a bagel dough Marc had posted one time and the bagels were really good.  I then went on to make a bagel pizza and that might have been one of my best pizzas.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #169 on: May 05, 2014, 11:14:11 PM »
As all your work.....just beautiful Mr. Johnny.  8)

CB
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #170 on: May 22, 2014, 08:51:11 PM »
Johnny,

That is a very good looking Neo-NY or whatever you want to call it!  :chef: Maybe you invented a new style of pizza.  Your Baguettes look delicious too!

I tried a bagel dough Marc had posted one time and the bagels were really good.  I then went on to make a bagel pizza and that might have been one of my best pizzas.

Norma

Thanks Norma! I'm not surprised that the bagel dough worked great for pizza - especially NY style pies.
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #171 on: May 22, 2014, 08:51:43 PM »
As all your work.....just beautiful Mr. Johnny.  8)

CB

Many thanks Chi-Town Bob! I appreciate it  :D
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #172 on: May 22, 2014, 08:58:23 PM »
This dough was 'forgotten' in the fridge:  a multi-day fermented, 72% hydration, no oil, mixed flour dough. Dough from the same batch as seen in Reply #30 in the post below:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30821.20

Silky dough - opening was a breeze. Topped with Mutti Passata, whole milk mozz, sliced onions, chopped deli-sliced ham, sliced bell peppers and diced tomatoes. Dried oregano post-bake.
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Offline mbrulato

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #173 on: May 23, 2014, 09:54:25 AM »
 :drool: :drool: :drool: and more  :drool:
Mary Ann

Offline drmatt357

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #174 on: May 26, 2014, 12:40:45 AM »
This dough was 'forgotten' in the fridge:  a multi-day fermented, 72% hydration, no oil, mixed flour dough.

Wow,72%!  I'm at 51-54%. That seems like it would be soup to me. Am I missing something?

Offline jsaras

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #175 on: May 26, 2014, 11:45:39 AM »
Johnny is the master at defying expectations.  How he does it all with very low protein flour is remarkable.  He may be starting the next new trend in pizza making!
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #176 on: May 26, 2014, 04:54:17 PM »
Wow,72%!  I'm at 51-54%. That seems like it would be soup to me. Am I missing something?
Matt,

Are you using a stand mixer or are you making the dough by hand, and are you using the straight dough method? And what kind of flour are you using?

Peter

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #177 on: May 26, 2014, 05:27:03 PM »
:drool: :drool: :drool: and more  :drool:

Viva la pizza! LOL, thanks MaryAnn!

Wow,72%!  I'm at 51-54%. That seems like it would be soup to me. Am I missing something?

drmatt357,

Not like soup, more like thick stew consistency.  ;) Seriously - it's not that bad, just takes some getting used to and knowing how to develop the dough. Making bread and pizza in the 80-85% hydration range has helped develop "a feel" for working with high HR doughs.

Johnny is the master at defying expectations.  How he does it all with very low protein flour is remarkable.  He may be starting the next new trend in pizza making!

jsaras - many thanks for the compliment, I appreciate it!  Working with low protein flour has been (and continues to be) an ongoing learning process.  My experimenting with low protein flour (usually around the 9.8% protein range) was born out of necessity rather than preference, considering that low protein flour is what I have to work with here in Brazil.  Adapt and overcome!
« Last Edit: May 26, 2014, 05:31:13 PM by Johnny the Gent »
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Offline drmatt357

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #178 on: May 26, 2014, 07:38:48 PM »
Matt,

Are you using a stand mixer or are you making the dough by hand, and are you using the straight dough method? And what kind of flour are you using?

Peter

Use standard mixer with hook for ten minutes. Don't know exactly what straight dough is but I'm married to a girl if that helps. My flour is Bouncer high gluten with 20% semolina. Been at 52% hydration. Just made a dough ball @ 61% and will see in 5 days how she goes.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Random NY pies
« Reply #179 on: May 27, 2014, 08:06:39 PM »
Use standard mixer with hook for ten minutes. Don't know exactly what straight dough is but I'm married to a girl if that helps. My flour is Bouncer high gluten with 20% semolina. Been at 52% hydration. Just made a dough ball @ 61% and will see in 5 days how she goes.
Dr. Matt,

The straight dough method calls for mixing and kneading essentially all of the dough ingredients at the same time, even if the ingredients are sequenced into the dough at different times. As I understand it, there would be no use of preferments or autolyse or similar rest periods. Once the dough is kneaded, it is processed further as called for by the recipe.

The reason I asked you whether you were using the straight dough method is because if you were to attempt to use that method with a hydration 0f 72%, even with a high-gluten flour and semolina flour, both of which can take on a lot of water compared with weaker flours, and assuming that you do not use a lot of bench flour, you would most likely end up with a wet and sticky dough that is hard to handle. To get around that problem, you would typically do a lot of stretch and folds on the bench, using minimal bench flour, and allow the dough to rest between the stretch and folds. You would stop the stretch and folds once the dough loses its wetness. Another approach that you could take is to do an extensive knead of the dough using your stand mixer, along the lines, for example, as discussed at https://sites.google.com/site/hollosyt/quickrusticciabattapizza. In the case of the dough described in that article, the hydration is a bit over 92%, which necessitated the use of parchment paper to be able to make a pizza out of the dough. One of the negatives of this approach is that the dough is kneaded to full gluten development. That is symptomatic of bread dough rather than pizza dough that is typically kneaded to a somewhat underkneaded state. These differences often lead to debates on the forum whether bread dough is the same as pizza dough. Stretch and folds are also creations of bread dough making, so that will also occasionally enter the debates mentioned above.

Another way of improving the handling of a high hydration dough is to sift the flour. That breaks up lumps in the flours and separates the flour into grains that allow the dough to hydrate more fully. Since flour is sifted at the miller's facility, there is usually little need to sift flour in the small bags as found in the supermarkets. However, for the large 50-lb bags, the compression (and settling) dynamics of flour in large bags is considerably greater than for small bags of flour. Since you mentioned that you are using Bouncer flour, I assume that you are using a large bag of that flour.

Finally, when using a high hydration dough, if one of your objectives is to get a good oven spring, you will want to use an oven that can deliver a lot of energy to the dough. In Johnny's case, I believe that for some while he was using an old oven that could deliver a temperature of around 300 degrees C (570 degrees F). I believe that he now has a new gas oven although I don't recall what bake temperatures he is able to get out of that oven. There are other ways of improving the degree of oven spring for a high hydration dough, but a high oven temperature is one of the best.

Peter