Author Topic: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza  (Read 1346 times)

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Online TXCraig1

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Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« on: August 31, 2013, 10:10:38 AM »
From the man himself:

1. The Crust
At the base of the Rosa is the crust. Bianco begins with a "simple, straightforward dough" without any "magic ingredients." He does point out that he uses a blend of local wheat flours from Central Milling in Utah and Hayden Flour Mill in Phoenix. These are "strong" protein-rich flours, which ultimately give the crust chew. The wheat flours also add a nutty flavor to the crust. Along with water, the flour is mixed with fresh yeast, sea salt, and a bit of yesterday's dough. Calling salt "romantic," Bianco explains that lately he's been using a Mexican sea salt along with Pacific sea salts. He has also been using salt from a cave in Arizona. Careful to be "gentle" with the dough, Bianco lets it temper before he ferments it for 18 - 20 hours in a refrigerator. The long, cold fermentation builds flavor in the crust.

In the custom-built, 800F wood-burning oven, the crust cooks until it is charred and slightly bubbled. In the oven, Bianco uses local woods like pecan and red oak, noting that in Arizona there's no lack of "dry-ass wood." He finds that the size, cure, and dryness of the wood impact the pizza more than the varietal. The pecan wood he most often uses adds a "subtle" flavor to the pizza, but certainly not the kind of big, smoky flavors that cooking with something like mesquite might. When it first enters the intense heat of the oven, the crust expands. When it's reached the point where it can't expand any further, Bianco moves it to a cooler part of the oven to finish. He estimates the entire cooking process is about three minutes.

2. The Cheese
For the Rosa, Bianco chose a 24 - 30 month-old Parmigiano-Reggiano imported from Italy. Although the focaccia that helped inspire the Rosa was made with Grana, Bianco prefers the nuttiness and fattiness of the Parmigiano. (When Bianco was developing the recipe, he also happened to have Parmigiano in house.) Bianco tosses a generous handful of largely shredded Parmigiano onto the dough as the pizza's first component, leaving about a "thumb space" at the end for the crust. He notes that the weight of the shred ensures proper melting, and he notes if the cheese is low moisture he will use a bit more.

3. The Onions
After adding the cheese, Bianco adds extremely thin red onions to the pizza. He estimates that each pie uses only ⅛ to of an onion. He shaves the onions into ribbons with a mandolin, his ultimate goal being to "show restraint" with the flavor. Before adding them to the pizza, Bianco tosses the onions with extra virgin olive oil and sea salt. The onions are wilted and seasoned before ever going into the oven.

4. The Rosemary
Bianco adds a small amount of fresh rosemary immediately after adding the onions. He notes that when he was originally developing the Rosa that rosemary was one of his go-to ingredients and that there was rosemary growing right outside the restaurant. Just before adding it to the pizza, Bianco takes the rosemary off the stem and leaves the needles intact. Chopping, he says, would release too much of the essential oils which would "f..k up" the pizza. He sprinkles the needles of an estimated a sprig of rosemary over the pizza, giving it "just a kiss of heady, forresty flavor." After adding rosemary, Bianco puts the pizza into the oven.

5. The Pistachios
About half-way through the cooking process, Bianco adds a heaping tablespoon of Arizona pistachios. As with the onions, Bianco emphasizes the importance of pre-seasoning. Bianco preps the pistachios by quickly roasting them with a bit of salt. He then gives them "a bump" with a mortar and pestle, to create different textures with both broken and "dusty" pistachio bits. Adding them while the pizza cooks allows the pistachios to sink into the cheese a bit, as opposed to sitting on top of it. Bianco decided to use pistachio because he couldn't find suitable sesame seeds to recreate the flavors he had in Liguria. He had an abundance of pistachios on hand and found that they "married well" with the flavors of the pie. When the pizza is taken out of the oven, Bianco adds a "glug" of cold, Pacific Sun extra virgin olive oil which adds a temperature contrast and a bright flavor to the pizza. He also likes that as slices are taken from the pizza at the table, each slice is dragged back through the oil, mixing the "burnt bits" into every bite.

http://eater.com/archives/2013/08/28/eater-elements-the-rosa-at-pizzeria-bianco.php
Pizza is not bread.


Offline Mmmph

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2013, 10:58:16 AM »
I enjoy making this pizza for others. Never any slices left from this one.
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2013, 12:13:01 PM »
Thanks for posting this detailed information. Next time I will try adding the pistachios later and shredding the Parm cheese more coarsely.

I visited Pizzeria Bianco a year or so ago and ordered the Rosa. It was incredibly good, one of the best pizzas I've ever eaten.

Regards,

TinRoof

Online Tscarborough

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2013, 12:48:19 PM »
That sounds great, I think I will try it with sesame seeds instead of the pistachios.

Offline BenLee

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2013, 12:53:44 PM »
One of my favorite pies to make.  Bianco really did invent something special.  I used to use pine nuts in place of the pistachios but I've moved on to pumpkin seeds now, which has been amazing.  I tend to use the grana padano because its more common in my fridge.  I also use my garlic mandolin to shave the onions super thin. 

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2013, 01:02:23 PM »
I love the pumpkin seed idea.
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Offline BenLee

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2013, 10:30:03 AM »
I love the pumpkin seed idea.

just gotta make sure they are salted =)  But yeah, it is amazing.  I've been trying to find another pie to use pumpkin seeds on but haven't figured it out yet.

Online Tscarborough

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2013, 03:09:17 PM »
My sesame seeds were pretty old, so I bought some raw pistachios.  This will be pizza number 1 tonight.

Offline BenLee

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2013, 09:26:19 PM »
I couldn't get it off my mind and had to make one.  Might have been my best tasting one yet.

Red Onion
Grana Padano
Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Rosemary from my garden
Salted Pumpkin Seeds

I did a pitstop for a day in Phoenix before my honeymoon in Hawaii.  I so wanted to go to Bianco but we were visiting my wife's relatives and ended up going to some other local joint because they insisted on taking us and paying.  Maybe one day....

Online Tscarborough

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2013, 09:35:55 PM »
That looks tasty indeed.  I didn't use enough onion on mine, I think, but it was still very good.


Offline BenLee

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2013, 09:43:26 PM »
what I found is that if you slice the onions in enough, you can got nuts with them and cover the entire pie without overpowering the pie.  Its still super light.   

I just used my knife for these onions but when I've got time to waste, I use a tiny garlic mandoline which slices them uberthin.

I've also used the same technique for mushrooms with great results. 


Great looking pie.  Maybe I'll mail order some of those AZ pistachios.  I've done it with California before.

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2013, 11:29:36 PM »
That looks tasty indeed.  I didn't use enough onion on mine, I think, but it was still very good.

Looks darn good from here.
Pizza is not bread.

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2013, 11:39:02 PM »
BTW, for those who, like me, tire of shelling pistachios, Trader Joe's sells some very nice shelled pistachios.  A good time saver.

Offline Serpentelli

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2013, 10:56:12 AM »
Will definitely be trying this one.

Thanks for the background info, Craig.

John K
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Offline deb415611

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Re: Elements of Bianco's Rosa Pizza
« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2013, 11:42:55 AM »
going on the to do list  :)  I have some smoked pistachios that I think I will use