Author Topic: new camera  (Read 6405 times)

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Offline scott r

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new camera
« on: February 23, 2006, 05:10:44 PM »
I am very excited to finally have a working digital camera, so what better way to break it in than with some pictures of one of my babies.

I know I will never get a pizza that looks like it was made in a real Neapolitan oven in my apartment, but here is a pic of a pie from my oven on the self clean cycle at about 750 degrees. This one was made with ischia starter and caputo pizzeria flour with no oil.  It was a 40 hour room temp rise and a 60% hydration dough.  The pizza was topped with hand crushed Stanislaus tomatoes, olive oil from sorrento, fresh minced garlic, a light sprinkle of oregano, and sea salt. 


P.S.  Petezza, did you ever have a chance to evaluate that oregano I gave you?  I just ran out of the stuff, and I must say I really miss it.  Salumeria has unfortunately stopped carrying that brand.

« Last Edit: February 24, 2006, 01:16:24 AM by scott r »


Offline David

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Re: new camera
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2006, 05:15:05 PM »
Looking good ...........Now everone say CHEEESSSSE !
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Offline scott r

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Re: new camera
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2006, 05:25:37 PM »
It always amazes me when I make one of these pies that I do not miss the cheese at all.  The flavor of this pie was really amazing without it.  I do cheat a little, straying from the Neapolitan tradition by mincing the garlic and using more of it.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2006, 05:28:52 PM by scott r »

Offline David

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Re: new camera
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2006, 05:30:49 PM »
I agree Scott.........I was just mugging for your new camera ;)
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Offline scott r

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Re: new camera
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2006, 05:31:41 PM »
I know, mug appreciated ;D

Offline briterian

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Re: new camera
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2006, 06:40:56 PM »
Regarding using the oven clean feature...can you let me know the steps to pull that off? 

Offline scott r

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Re: new camera
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2006, 06:47:37 PM »
I think it would really depend on your oven.  What brand and model do you have?

Offline briterian

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Re: new camera
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2006, 06:52:20 PM »
I have a GE XL 44 (JGBS23) Gas Kitchen Range.  It's a basic gas oven that has the lever arm in front that locks the door from opening.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: new camera
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2006, 07:23:54 PM »
While I was in Massachusetts over the Xmas holidays, I not only had the pleasure of meeting scott and his wife Kim, but I also sampled some of scott's Caputo pizzas that were baked in his "modified" oven. I can say, without exaggeration or reservation, that they were among the very best I have ever had--far better than I have been able to do with a Caputo Pizzeria dough in my oven. The man has real talent.

Yes, scott, I have been using the imported Greek oregano that you gave me. As I got close to using it all up, I found some Sicilian wild oregano that looks just like the Greek oregano. I did a side by side test, and although I could tell a difference, they were still pretty close. On a future visit I will bring you some of the Sicilian variety.

Peter

Offline scott r

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Re: new camera
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2006, 12:03:36 AM »
I have a GE XL 44 (JGBS23) Gas Kitchen Range.  It's a basic gas oven that has the lever arm in front that locks the door from opening.

I don't know much about that oven, but it should be pretty easy to figure out.  Basically you want to get in there and find a small piece of metal that makes contact with another piece of metal when the door latch is thrown.  It is possible that in your oven the opposite happens and the contact is broken when the latch is engaged.  Whatever it is you want to fool your oven into thinking that the latch is thrown when it is not.  In my oven this is really easy.  I take a spare metal door key and stick it between the two metal contacts.  This fools the oven into thinking that the door is locked, and you can open the door whenever you would like. Now the warnings:

If you have small children please do not do this to your oven.  If they opened the door they could get hit with a blast of intense heat that could burn them.
Do not ever leave the oven unattended. 
Cover the glass of your door with tin foil, or it could burst upon contact with spilled tomato sauce, or any other liquid.
While there are most likely not high voltage wires running through the latch housing area of your oven, please unplug it before you go in there and do any snooping around.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2006, 12:05:08 AM by scott r »


Offline scott r

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Re: new camera
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2006, 12:18:29 AM »
While I was in Massachusetts over the Xmas holidays, I not only had the pleasure of meeting scott and his wife Kim, but I also sampled some of scott's Caputo pizzas that were baked in his "modified" oven. I can say, without exaggeration or reservation, that they were among the very best I have ever had--far better than I have been able to do with a Caputo Pizzeria dough in my oven. The man has real talent.

Yes, scott, I have been using the imported Greek oregano that you gave me. As I got close to using it all up, I found some Sicilian wild oregano that looks just like the Greek oregano. I did a side by side test, and although I could tell a difference, they were still pretty close. On a future visit I will bring you some of the Sicilian variety.

Peter

Peter, you are way too kind.  The reality is that I learned everything I know about dough from you and Marco.  With the information on this site any monkey with a 700 degree oven could have made you those pizzas!

About the oregano.  What I was really wondering is if you think that there is a big difference in flavor between the imported organic gourmet oregano, and something like McCormick or Penzy's.  To me it does make a big difference, but I was just wondering other peoples opinions.

The best stuff I have been able to find (and what I gave you) is actually from Sicily.  The stuff I have been a little bummed out about looks just like it, but was grown in Greece.  Salumeria Italiana has just restocked with two new Italian varieties, but not the one I fell in love with.  The new kinds look different.  As far as the stuff you have been able to find in Texas, does hit have purple stems?

The stuff I love that is now no longer available to me has this web site.  www.origanodisiciliafabaria.it
« Last Edit: February 24, 2006, 02:04:14 AM by scott r »

Offline scott r

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Re: new camera
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2006, 01:20:43 AM »
here are a few more pics of the other pie I made that night.  This one is chicken sausage, a blend of French feta and great lakes mozzarella cheese, sauteed spinach, and a few oil cured black olives.

These pies are larger than a standard Neapolitan with 330g dough balls.

Peter, the pies I made you during your visit had a little high gluten flour blended with the Caputo, and a touch of oil.  It should come as no suprise that I have gone back to the no oil, Caputo pizzeria flour only crusts.  Why mess with tradition, right!  The results are a slightly better crust flavor, and a a different texture that I now think I prefer.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2006, 01:30:56 AM by scott r »

Offline scott r

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Re: new camera
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2006, 01:32:27 AM »
I have decided that the flash is evil.

Offline David

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Re: new camera
« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2006, 08:41:21 AM »
Nice side shot Scott.Did you use your short hand knead on these or use your machine?
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Online Pete-zza

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Re: new camera
« Reply #14 on: February 24, 2006, 08:45:12 AM »
There's absolutely no doubt about the difference between the imported oregano and the domestic kind. I grow oregano in my back yard and use it fresh on pizzas and in sauces, but I have also dried some and it bears no resemblance to the imported kind. I have shown below a photo of the Sicilian wild oregano I bought recently in an Italian market (Jimmy's) in Dallas.

I tried to remember which pizzas scott, the trained monkey, made for us when I visited him. Scott can correct me but I believe the first one was a standard Margherita with Stanislaus Alta Cucina tomatoes (they are like a domestic version of the San Marzano tomatoes), buffalo mozzarella cheese, Grande fresh mozzarella (bocconcini), and fresh basil. The second pizza was based on an alfredo-style sauce made by reducing heavy cream and adding pesto, prosciutto and a lot of fresh minced garlic. The third used the Alta Cucinas with feta cheese and sausage and quite likely the imported oregano. I remember sampling some exquisite provolone cheese although I don't recall whether it was used on any of the pizzas he made. Scott has become so popular with his Caputo pies that his friends are constantly trying to get invited to his place for pizza. The pizzas are that good. We even joked that scott could open up his own pizza place and instead of having an expensive wood-fired Neapolitan oven, behind the curtains would be a row of cheap home ovens with rigged clean cycle mechanisms and a bunch of pizzaioli in front of the ovens with peels in hand. How about this as the name for the place: Scott's Clean Cycle Fired Neapolitan-Style Pizzas. How funny is that?

Peter
« Last Edit: February 24, 2006, 08:55:33 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline jimd

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Re: new camera
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2006, 09:08:21 AM »
I don't know if I picked up this link here or somewhere else in my web travels, but here is a link to a company that sells seeds for Italian herbs, tomatoes, etc...

www.growitalian.com



I have not ordered from them yet, but plan to do so this Spring. One of the seeds they sell is billed as Italian Oregano, and perhaps it is close to the Oregano mentioned above.

Jim

Offline tonymark

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Re: new camera
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2006, 11:31:41 AM »

Pete-zza - I looks like that is just some kind of oregano in flower.  I have a HUGE garden bed (5' x 5') of oregano and it looks like that during flowering.  I generally don't use my during flowering (late May - early June, Atlanta).

Furthermore, the variety that I have is much different and tastier than most people grow.  I moved some from my old neighbor's garden in  1994.  Then I moved it again when I moved in 1996 (present location).   The oregano keeps some green leaves all year, and is completely perennial.  It is highly susceptible to weeds and must all be dug up, cleaned and planted back in a freshly prepared bed ever 4-5 years.  I have done this twice since '96.

I would happily send you some divisions out to you this spring.

TM

P.S. This makes a great spicey oregano that I harvest and dry right before flowering.  I am already out for this year.
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Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: new camera
« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2006, 11:46:41 AM »
I planted mine from seeds 4 years ago, and it keep selfseeding and spreading all over the place..

Offline tonymark

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Re: new camera
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2006, 02:55:40 PM »
pizzanapoletana - where are you located?  I don't think my reseeds, but it might.  I thought it was spreading by runners.

Also, what variety is your called?  I may like to get some seeds.

TM
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Offline scott r

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Re: new camera
« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2006, 05:23:21 PM »
Nice side shot Scott.Did you use your short hand knead on these or use your machine?

David, these pies were about a 15 minute mix with the machine, then a hand knead.  It took the whole 15 minutes to incorporate most of the flour.  There is  a point where the dough in the dlx just clings to the roller mechanism, and you can not get any more flour into it without playing games with the machine.  Rather than do this, I prefer to take the dough out and finish by hand.  At least for know it just seems to work better if I can touch the dough to know when it feels right.  I think my hydration is probably lower than you or Bill use because that is what seems to work best with my oven.  With a hotter oven I could probably get away with just using the dlx, and skipping the final hand knead/flour incorporation step.

Can you guys with the Santos get down to a 60% hydration caputo dough easily?
« Last Edit: February 24, 2006, 09:05:54 PM by scott r »