Author Topic: Ball to Bench Process  (Read 874 times)

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Offline Colonel Crust

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Ball to Bench Process
« on: April 08, 2015, 04:50:02 PM »
I'm not sure if this is normal but my dough balls do not come out of their tupperware without serious coaxing/shaking. When they do come out they are usually stretched from the counter to the bottom of the container as the last few strands give way. This leaves my dough ball in a not so round condition and I think is contributing to their over-elasticity sometimes. I would like to know what the process is for others to remove their dough from the container. I do use PAM on the balls.


Another question: are you dumping your dough balls directly into bench flour?  Is it true that the ball will absorb the right amount of flour and not to worry about using too much bench flour?


Offline theppgcowboy

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2015, 05:25:59 PM »
The best way I find to get a dough ball out of a plastic container is to sprinkle a little flour on the dough, turn the container upside down, break the seal between the plastic and the dough with my finger, and slowly put my finger between the dough and container working toward the center from the edges in and paying attention to the edges. At this point the dough is making its release and it starts to fall out. But if you do this about 1.5 or so hours ahead of time, the elasticity should leave if you get too rough with the dough. I then dredge the whole ball in flour. Hope this makes sense. My balls are 250 grams.

Offline Crispy Please

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2015, 07:22:24 AM »
Someone else on the forum showed how they put each ball in a separate plastic container, sprayed with oil, upside down. That is to say, the lid becomes the base and the "bowl" becomes the cover. This makes it easy to insert a scraper or spatula at the edge of the dough (with the lid now upside down) and nudge the dough onto the bench. Been using it since I first saw it and it really helps maintain the shape and rise of the dough.

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Offline hodgey1

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2015, 12:21:38 PM »
Are you spraying the Pam on the dough ball or in the container? I have for years been spraying the container and having no problems removing the dough from the container. Occasionally I have to coax it out a bit, but its never a problem.

Offline Colonel Crust

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2015, 02:33:20 PM »
Someone else on the forum showed how they put each ball in a separate plastic container, sprayed with oil, upside down. That is to say, the lid becomes the base and the "bowl" becomes the cover.

Thats so crazy it might just work! I'm going to try that on my next batch. Thanks for the tip

Offline Colonel Crust

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2015, 03:12:47 PM »
Are you spraying the Pam on the dough ball or in the container?

I've been spraying the container but Im using fairly high hydration dough so its kinda sticky.  Plus I think I may need to find a container that has less grip. 

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2015, 03:31:57 PM »
Hate me if you want, but try using a bread bag or "food" bag (not a Zip-Lok bag). Just lightly oil the dough ball, drop it into the bag, twist the open end into a pony tail and tuck it under the dough ball as you place it in the fridge, if you want to stack them in your fridge to save space, put the bagged dough in your existing plastic container uncovered for a couple hours, then cover and stack. To use the dough just invert the bag to turn the dough out. I like to turn the dough out into a bowl of dusting flour that I will use to open the dough balls into pizza skins. The dough maintains a nice round shape and doesn't get damaged or stretched during removal from the bag. You can reuse the bags a number of times too.
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Offline nick57

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2015, 03:48:48 PM »
 A lot of people on the forum use the method the Doctor describes with good results. I have not tried it yet. I do use a 1 gallon ice cream  bucket. I oil the lid and place the dough ball on it, then place the bucket on top. When ready to  remove the ball, I turn over the lid and let the dough plop onto my palm. It works pretty good for me, and the dough keeps it's shape

Offline Colonel Crust

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2015, 08:20:28 AM »
Hate me if you want, but try using a bread bag or "food" bag (not a Zip-Lok bag). Just lightly oil the dough ball, drop it into the bag, twist the open end into a pony tail and tuck it under the dough ball as you place it in the fridge

I've always been intrigued by people using bags. The only time I've used bags was when using store boughi frozen dough balls. Those stuck terribly to the bag when inverting but the dough was not oiled either.  I told my wife to start saving the bread bags. Will try it out. Thanks Doc.


Offline PrimeRib

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2015, 10:33:02 AM »

I've always been intrigued by people using bags. The only time I've used bags was when using store boughi frozen dough balls. Those stuck terribly to the bag when inverting but the dough was not oiled either.  I told my wife to start saving the bread bags. Will try it out. Thanks Doc.

Bags, like containers, also need oil. I use a shot of spray oil. Only issue I have with bags is sometimes the dough expands into a squarish shape.  Pic is dough just balled.  When ready to use, I rip off the top of the bag.



Offline bradtri

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2015, 01:36:23 PM »
For larger numbers of dough balls I've done the Dough Doctor's bag method and it works great.  Make sure to use the longer food bags that he recommends and you'll be just fine.

For smaller numbers of dough balls (6 or less) I use round Gladware containers.  I don't fight the dough to get it out ... just take the lid off and set it upside down over a floured work surface and gravity will do all the work for you.

Offline IIFYMpizza

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 05:46:32 AM »
I was thinking about creating a new topic for that question but i'll ask it here first, so maybe someone's going to help me. With a 48h cold fermentation dough 61% hydration already balled, how long prior to baking should i take the dough out of the fridge? also should i knead the dough before letting it sit in the room temp. after i took it out of the fridge or does it defeat the purpose of a long slow fermentation that allows the dough to get super airy inside?

Offline Colonel Crust

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #12 on: Yesterday at 08:29:52 AM »
I'll let more experienced pipe in as well but I would normally take the dough out at least 1.5 hours before forming. Ive found that letting it adjust longer to room temperature doesnt hurt either. Sometimes I will go 3-4 hours without consequence. As far as kneading - no.  If its already balled then I try to be as delicate with the dough as possible until forming. If I'm rough with the dough I get too much elasticity.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 08:31:32 AM by Colonel Crust »

Online jvp123

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #13 on: Yesterday at 09:59:44 AM »
I'll let more experienced pipe in as well but I would normally take the dough out at least 1.5 hours before forming. Ive found that letting it adjust longer to room temperature doesnt hurt either. Sometimes I will go 3-4 hours without consequence. As far as kneading - no.  If its already balled then I try to be as delicate with the dough as possible until forming. If I'm rough with the dough I get too much elasticity.

What is your typical "room temp" that you are getting 1.5-4 hours as an ok warm up time?
Jeff

Offline Colonel Crust

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #14 on: Yesterday at 11:04:24 AM »
What is your typical "room temp" that you are getting 1.5-4 hours as an ok warm up time?

about 72 degrees

Online jvp123

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #15 on: Yesterday at 11:42:53 AM »
You may want to try opening when they are a little cooler.  This may help with the slack dough you referred to.
I also get sticking when I try to release my dough from the container.  I like my dough a little slack, so I may at some point go to a proofing box so that it doesn't ride up the sides and so I can release my dough with a dough scraper.  For now I just tuck back in the stretchy parts and deal with it.
Jeff

Offline Colonel Crust

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #16 on: Yesterday at 12:55:32 PM »
You may want to try opening when they are a little cooler.  This may help with the slack dough you referred to.
I also get sticking when I try to release my dough from the container.  I like my dough a little slack, so I may at some point go to a proofing box so that it doesn't ride up the sides and so I can release my dough with a dough scraper.  For now I just tuck back in the stretchy parts and deal with it.

Im not actually having issues anymore. I was just replying back to IIFYMpizza.  Maybe he can elaborate on the issues he is experiencing. The way I solved my problem was using the method demonstrated by Nick above. I place the dough on the lid of the container instead of in the container and that has really helped tremendously in getting the dough in-tact into the bench flour. I find that not disturbing the dough and giving it plenty of time to come up to room temperature to be the two greatest factors in producing a dough that is easily workable. 


Offline IIFYMpizza

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Re: Ball to Bench Process
« Reply #17 on: Today at 03:43:01 AM »
Well i gave my dough about an hour before baking and it came out pretty easy with just a dust of flour on my hands as i dont have a dough scraper. I also had my dough turned upside down for the whole time in the fridge and that makes things a lot easier. Would recommend to anyone that struggles to get the dough out without damageing it. Thanks for your help guys.


 

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