Author Topic: Why the blistering? From down under  (Read 395 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Harborganics

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 36
  • Location: Victor harbor South Australia
  • Harborganics wood oven pizza trailer
Why the blistering? From down under
« on: June 28, 2015, 08:16:52 AM »
Hi all, we recently started our mobile business after having many pizza nights at home using a wfo with many positive reactions. I have been reading a lot on this forum and bought a few interesting books to educate me more. My latest one is from Peter Reinhard's american pie, and his search for " the perfect pizza"
Interesting indeed but what I don't get is why the blistering and burned bits on a pizza? It doesn't really look appealing and I haven't seen any pizzeria in Australia doing it that way. I guess every country has its own way of making pizzas but one of my pizza cook books comes from a very well known chef who had his fair share of pizzerias and even Australia's and worlds best pizza....no blistering or burned bits on his pies...
Is it the dough? Or the heat of the oven that makes this happen?..
As I mentioned, I am new and...well, it's a never ending learning process this pizza making...
Thanks everyone for the great posts, pics and info on here.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2015, 12:35:08 AM by Harborganics »
JACKO


Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 15866
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Why the blistering?
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2015, 08:22:15 AM »
It might be helpful if you posted a picture showing the blistering and burned bits you are asking about.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Online Harborganics

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 36
  • Location: Victor harbor South Australia
  • Harborganics wood oven pizza trailer
Re: Why the blistering? From down under
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2015, 06:30:51 AM »
Sorry Craig, here is just one I grabbed randomly from on here.
I just wonder how and why those black burned spots need to be on a pizza.
I assume it has to do with the intense heat of the ovens.
Thanks, Jack.
JACKO

Offline hodgey1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 172
  • Location: NW Pa
  • I Love Pizza!
    • My WFO project
Re: Why the blistering? From down under
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2015, 07:48:22 AM »
Is it the dough? Or the heat of the oven that makes this happen?..

Hmmm, your pizza looks wonderful. In America you can charge extra for a pizza that looks like that. Craig can give more of a scientific answer than I, but what you are seeing is due to the high heat and the varying intensity of the wood fired flames effects on your dough. If that isn't appealing to you try to minimize the amount of live fire while baking your pies. If it is appealing to you, try and educate your customers as to what you are supplying them which appears to me to be a relatively close example of an Neapolitan pizza and charge them extra ;D

Online Harborganics

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 36
  • Location: Victor harbor South Australia
  • Harborganics wood oven pizza trailer
Re: Why the blistering? From down under
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2015, 08:08:01 AM »
Hahaha, thanks hodgy, I wish that was my pizza. I just randomly selected that on from this forum as I wondered how and mainly why the Neapolitan pizza needs to look like that. I can see it happen that a customer would complain because they might think it's burned...
And your right, I need more education on this so I can tell my customers the why.
I've had not one yet coming out of my oven like that.
JACKO

Online Harborganics

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 36
  • Location: Victor harbor South Australia
  • Harborganics wood oven pizza trailer
Re: Why the blistering? From down under
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2015, 08:14:43 AM »
These are some of mine from last weekend
JACKO

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 15866
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Why the blistering? From down under
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2015, 10:57:54 AM »
Hahaha, thanks hodgy, I wish that was my pizza. I just randomly selected that on from this forum as I wondered how and mainly why the Neapolitan pizza needs to look like that. I can see it happen that a customer would complain because they might think it's burned...
And your right, I need more education on this so I can tell my customers the why.
I've had not one yet coming out of my oven like that.

That's what is typically referred to as leoparding. It's largely a function of the high temperature (>850F) bake of the Neapolitan style - particularly when the dough is fermented for an extended period of time (>12 hours but really 24 hours+). The amount, size, and color/darkness of the spots can vary quite a bit. With respect to the pie in Reply 2 above, the leoparding is fairly sparse and not particularly dark overall. That pie has a more even browning and the spots are just barely what would typically be considered leoparding. A lot of what you see in that picture is exaggerated by the sauce running up the cornicione. The picture below (from da Michele in Naples) is an example of more distinct spots. Some char is essential to the balance of a Neapolitan pizza. It can come from the bottom of the pizza as well as the spotting on top.

Many people like the visually striking appearance of leoparding. As you noted, it can look burned to other people - particularly those not familiar with Neapolitan pizza. There are also plenty of people who know Neapolitan pizza who prefer a more gentle browning and less distinct spots, and there are people who like larger "big cat" spots and still others who think such spots are a sign of a defective dough. This is a small answer to a very big question.

Your pizza in Reply has more of a NY look to it. Leoparding is not a characteristic of that style nor are oven temperatures typically high enough for it to happen.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Online Harborganics

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 36
  • Location: Victor harbor South Australia
  • Harborganics wood oven pizza trailer
Re: Why the blistering? From down under
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2015, 06:40:18 AM »
thanks Craig, that is really helpful. I guess you cant please everyone but you have to stick to what you believe in.
I wouldn't mind my pizzas coming out of the oven that way so I can actually try myself what its like.
I do ferment my dough for at least 24 hours and today I actually used your dough for the first time with my own sourdough starter culture.
I always par bake mine at 200 degr. celcius for 1:30 minutes as it is too hard stretching the dough when the temperatures are around the 9-10 degr. celcius in the morning. being mobile the only way to make them is to par bake, so far with pretty good results.
I will try to make some pics this weekend.
JACKO