Author Topic: mixed thoughts on mixing dough  (Read 718 times)

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Offline fazzari

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mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« on: September 09, 2013, 07:56:24 PM »
I'm constantly experimenting with the doughs I make at home..just to see the many things there are to learn.  Quite by accident, I amended a mixing process found at thefreshloaf.com to see how it would handle pizza dough.  So, here is where I'm at...I put all my ingredients in the Kitchen Aid, and using the paddle, mix for 1 minute on low (this gathers all the dough together).  The dough sits 5 minutes, and then it is mixed again for 1 minute (using the paddle) at a slightly higher speed.  The very shabby dough is then poured on a lightly oiled baking sheet and is stretched and folded 3 times in 15 minute intervals (once each at the 15,30 and 45 minute mark).  After one hour the dough is scaled, balled and refrigerated for later use.  What I have found, is that the quality of the dough holds up much longer mixed this way....in fact the quality is as good as a dough ball which has been reballed.  I am one of those who like brown, crisp, light pizzas.  The following shows the dough right after mixing, and then after 1 hour following stretch and folds.
John


Offline fazzari

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2013, 08:03:25 PM »
I tried an experiment, where I mixed a batch of dough using this method.  I scaled and balled 3 doughs and simply scaled and refrigerated the other 3 doughs to be used for comparison (to be balled later).  The pizzas below are both 48 hours old...the first one was balled the first day after mixing, the second was balled the night before the bake.
John

Offline fazzari

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2013, 08:08:39 PM »
The second part of the experiment goes to doughs which are 84 hours old.  The first one was balled on the first day after mixing, and the second was balled 12 hours prior to bake.

John

Offline fazzari

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2013, 08:13:28 PM »
The last of the experiment...the doughs are 96 hours old.  The first one was balled on the the first day, the second one was balled 12 hours prior to bake.  Here is the point where the more recently balled dough is a little better than the other one...but I can't complain, they are both excellent!!
John

Offline norma427

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2013, 08:55:35 PM »
John,

Those pizzas look excellent.  ;D  What hydration did you use for your dough? 

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Online Pete-zza

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2013, 08:58:28 PM »
John,

 ^^^

Did you use any oil in the dough?

Peter

Online mitchjg

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2013, 10:06:56 PM »
FWIW, this approach is a theme in Peter Reinhart's book "Artisan Breads Every Day."  The book very much focuses on making doughs without a lot of work and then refrigerating the dough - the bread to be made sometime in the next few days by taking the dough out of the fridge, shaping, rising, and baking.

For example, the recipes for lean bread, french bread, focaccia and ciabatta all call for a mix of 1 to 2 minutes (depending on the bread), 5 minute rest, mix for 1 to 2 minutes (depending) and then into the fridge.

I have made the ciabatta and focaccia many times and they always come out excellent.   :chef:

I had not thought of this for trying a pizza dough.  I will next time!

- Mitch

Offline fazzari

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2013, 11:41:05 PM »
Norma and Peter and Mitch
Got a little ahead of myself on this experiment...I should have used a single batch mixed two ways to see the difference.  I will start this experiment tomorrow night.

I have found through trial and error that using a 68% hydration rate with 2% oil works perfectly when using ALL Trumps flour....especially since I am one who loves the reball...it's a snap.
Mitch, let me know how it turns out...I'm hoping its' not just in my head.

John

Offline pythonic

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2013, 10:43:28 AM »
Those last two pics are mouthwatering!  Keep up the good work.
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline texmex

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2013, 11:06:09 AM »
Ah, to Kitchenaid, or not...

Sometimes I just forget I even have a mixer and before I know it my hands have done the work.

I will keep this in mind for my next dough batch. Thanks again for all your efforts, John. My sourdough starter is awake again and the dough bug has hit me hard!
Reesa


Offline mbrulato

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Re: mixed thoughts on mixing dough
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2013, 11:38:16 AM »
@Mitch - I have used Reinhart's recipes for ciabatta as well and they always come out excellent, even when I monkey around around with hydration%  and flour types  :drool:

@pythonic - I love the way the last batch of pies look too!  If that were in front of me, I don't think I would share  :angel:

Great looking pies, John!  Thanks for sharing  :)

Mary Ann
Mary Ann


 

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