Author Topic: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results  (Read 2968 times)

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Offline fazzari

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #40 on: September 22, 2013, 02:39:40 AM »
The second was is the folded dough....looks totally different than the other one.  Baked in 4 minutes 27 seconds, great oven spring, great browning, nice crispness, much stronger dough ball....excellent pizza!!
John


Online Pete-zza

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #41 on: September 22, 2013, 11:20:27 AM »
John,

I'm glad that you are continuing with your experiments even if they make me go back to the books to see if crust coloration is specifically related to oven spring :-D.

FYI, the twelve minute mix/knead time is pretty standard for Tom Lehmann for basic doughs. See, for example, Reply 18 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7499.msg64554/topicseen.html#msg64554.

Peter

Offline fazzari

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #42 on: September 22, 2013, 04:03:55 PM »
John,

I'm glad that you are continuing with your experiments even if they make me go back to the books to see if crust coloration is specifically related to oven spring :-D.

FYI, the twelve minute mix/knead time is pretty standard for Tom Lehmann for basic doughs. See, for example, Reply 18 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7499.msg64554/topicseen.html#msg64554.

Peter
Peter, it is only because of all the work I've done with reballs, that I tried to make this connection.  For weeks and weeks, I used to make a dough batch with 5 or 6 dough balls that I would use one per day to see how they aged.  While 24, or 48 hour dough baked nicely, it was after then I noticed the dough running out of energy...that is, they had less oven spring, they browned slower and thus took longer to bake.  And after the reball, the oven spring was better, the browning was better, and thus the pizza baked in a shorter amount of time and as an added bonus, the pizza was nice and crisp.  These things happened 100% of the time without fail.  So, I think there might be a connection.

My big concern though now is: the stretch and fold.  What is so different about it versus standard mixing?  Is it the stretching of gluten which are already in alignment which makes it different.  It is a very clear difference, especially when using higher hydrated doughs, and if it's a sure thing for these doughs (I really believe this!), it has to make a difference in any dough.  Anyway, it's very interesting!!  Thanks for your remarks.
John

Offline pythonic

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #43 on: September 23, 2013, 03:36:28 PM »
I can confirm what John is saying about the reball.  My best pizzas were all reballed.

John:

What hydration were you using for your last 3 experiments?  68%?  Also, were u using All Trumps for all of these experiments?  I found a stretch and fold vid that I posted on here along time ago but the chef was using AP flour.  I think I'm gonna give your recipe a go to see what I am missing.

Here is the vid.





Nate
« Last Edit: September 24, 2013, 12:59:46 PM by pythonic »
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline fazzari

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #44 on: September 23, 2013, 09:37:55 PM »
I can confirm what John is saying about the reball.  My best pizzas were all reballed.

John:

What hydration were you using for your last 3 experiments?  68%?  Also, were u using All Trumps for all of these experiments?  I found a stretch and food vid that I posted on here along time ago but the chef was using AP flour.  I think I'm gonna give your recipe a go to see what I am missing.

Here is the vid.





Nate
The one's above are 62%....If you're gonna give it a go, try a higher hydration..maybe 65 -68...this is where it is remarkable.  All the flour I am using currently is All Trumps.
John

Offline pythonic

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #45 on: September 30, 2013, 08:44:20 PM »
Here is my 1st attempt.  Went with 65% and bouncer Bromated flour.  I've had issues with this Bouncer flour not being able to handle hydration so I thought 65% would be perfect.  To my surprise the dryness in the air really affected my dough and being able to do the folds properly.  It wasnt wet in my opinion.  Another issue I had was my doughball was harder to open than my norm.  Much more pullback.  I'm thinking because it wasnt kneaded enough.  Anyways here are two attempts.  1st baked in 4:30 and 2nd was 4:15.  I tried a shorter preheat time (25 mins) but still got too much char for my liking).  This crust was fantastically light though.  A definite winner.  I will try my next attempt at 67% and try to tame my beast oven.  LOL.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2013, 08:57:45 PM by pythonic »
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline fazzari

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #46 on: September 30, 2013, 10:58:29 PM »
Here is my 1st attempt.  Went with 65% and bouncer Bromated flour.  I've had issues with this Bouncer flour not being able to handle hydration so I thought 65% would be perfect.  To my surprise the dryness in the air really affected my dough and being able to do the folds properly.  It wasnt wet in my opinion.  Another issue I had was my doughball was harder to open than my norm.  Much more pullback.  I'm thinking because it wasnt kneaded enough.  Anyways here are two attempts.  1st baked in 4:30 and 2nd was 4:15.  I tried a shorter preheat time (25 mins) but still got too much char for my liking).  This crust was fantastically light though.  A definite winner.  I will try my next attempt at 67% and try to tame my beast oven.  LOL.
.
I think they look great!!!!!!!  As far as opening the dough, if you are folding it (reball), don't be afraid to let it sit out 4 to 5 hours if you have to...this has helped me tremendously!!

John

Offline pythonic

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #47 on: October 01, 2013, 07:40:40 AM »
.
I think they look great!!!!!!!  As far as opening the dough, if you are folding it (reball), don't be afraid to let it sit out 4 to 5 hours if you have to...this has helped me tremendously!!

John

Thanks John.  Didnt have to reball these ones.
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline pythonic

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #48 on: October 02, 2013, 07:55:36 PM »
John,

Did u you use a poolish for all of your pies in this thread?  I didn't use a poolish for mine.
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline fazzari

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Re: One dough batch, two different mixes, two results
« Reply #49 on: October 03, 2013, 12:42:02 AM »
John,

Did u you use a poolish for all of your pies in this thread?  I didn't use a poolish for mine.
Just the very beginning experiment used poolish...the rest I didn't

John


 

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