Author Topic: Making pizza in the tropics  (Read 477 times)

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Offline moltov

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  • Location: NZ
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Making pizza in the tropics
« on: September 13, 2013, 04:39:25 AM »
Hi fellow pizza lover
 I live between NZ and Malaysia due to my work, but that doesnt stop my love for making pizza.
One thing tho that I notice is the pizza i made in NZ and Malaysia turned out very different and I think the different in weather condition has alot to account for.
Most of the recipes on this site are mean for cold climate, I wonder if anyone can share any recipes that is climatized for tropical condition?
I tried a few things such as knock back half of the required yeast, use icy cold water for mixing and cold ferment methods. But is still not as good and pretty inconsistent.
Anyone here can offer some suggestion?
One other thing that i wonder is, say if i was to use cold ferment method, do i need to knock back the amount of yeast since it is subject to the same cold ferment treatment anyway?
Cheers


scott123

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Re: Making pizza in the tropics
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2013, 07:38:39 AM »
Moltov, consistency comes through controlling variables.

Try to maintain the same formula- if you change ratios, that will affect fermentation rates.

Cold water may help, but you might be able to work with room temp water with yeast adjustment. The most important thing, though, is that you pick a water temp and religiously stick to it.  As long as your dough temp, after mixing, is below 85, you should be fine.  If you need to use cold water to achieve that temp, use it, but measure the temp of the water and match it every time you make dough. Your thermometer is your best friend in this quest.

Also, stick to bottled instant dry yeast (IDY) and store it in the fridge. Packets are too inconsistent.

Store your flour in a cool, dry place that will hopefully maintain the same temp.  If you need to adjust for variations in flour temp with colder/warmer water, that's fine, but just make sure the mixed dough is always the same temp.

Ball the dough immediately after mixing and put it right in the fridge in covered containers.

Watch the dough.  If it doubles to triples in the fridge, you've used too much yeast and need to reduce the IDY on the next batch.  Depending on the style and flour, it should increase about .5x in volume.  After you remove it from the fridge and let it warm for a few hours before baking, it is during that time that it should reach 2x to 3x volume.

You might also want to get a fridge thermometer and make sure your fridge temp is somewhat consistent.

As long as your mixed dough is always the same temp, your formula doesn't change, and you dial in the fridge time to reach .5x growth, you should get consistent results. Beginners tend to mess a lot with formulas, which is fine, but just expect fermentation rates to change, which will require some trial and error.  Take plenty of notes for every dough- formula, water temp, flour temp, dough temp, target time, actual time to finish, etc.  As you build a book of rates, you'll have much less trial and error when you change up your formula.

At this point, the best thing you can do is make pizza when you've got a relatively free schedule- that way, if it ferments too quickly, you can bake it when it's ready.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 08:10:34 AM by scott123 »

Offline moltov

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  • Location: NZ
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Re: Making pizza in the tropics
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2013, 11:04:53 PM »
Thanks scott123 for the great advices, will definitely look into it.
For the cold rise, the fridge is set at 4c Celsius. Is that correct?
 

scott123

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Re: Making pizza in the tropics
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2013, 09:15:00 AM »
Yes, 4 c. is about where you want to be.  Like I said, though, get a fridge thermometer and confirm that it stays as close as possible to this temp.


 

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