Author Topic: how can I improve my dough?  (Read 946 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online chasenpse

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 361
  • Location: New York
    • Battle Hill Media
how can I improve my dough?
« on: September 13, 2013, 08:28:37 AM »
I'd love to get any feedback regarding my dough recipe and hear any improvements I can make to it, I've been trying to perfect the home pizza and feel that by standards I'm really close! Here's my recipe:

260g KA bread flour or caputo 00 (depending on cooking method)
130g water
98g starter @ 100% hydration
4-6g sea salt

I'll usually mix the ingredients on a low speed then divide them into about 245g balls and cold ferment for at least 24 hours, but ideally I like to use them after about 48 hours. With a high enough temperature the crust blisters up beautifully and the bottom of the pie is cooked nicely, but I find more times than not I'm not getting the rise I'd like to see - especially out of my home oven that maxes out at about 550F. I listed caputo as an occasional ingredient because when I have the opportunity I try to cook these pies on a very hot grill with a stone at around 750F. I don't get the characteristic leopard spotting on top, although the bottom of the pies come out nicely colored and the dough is nice and soft.

According to this hydration calculator I found online http://joshuacronemeyer.github.io/Flour-and-Water/ my recipe is at 58% hydration, but on paper it looks like it is 50%. Could this be my culprit?
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 08:34:41 AM by chasenpse »
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.


Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22005
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: how can I improve my dough?
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2013, 08:40:04 AM »
chasenpse,

The 58% figure is correct because it takes into account the flour and water used in the starter. If the 96 grams of starter comprises equal weights of flour and water (100% hydration), then the hydration calculation is as follows:

[(96/2) + 130]/[(96/2) + 260] = 178/308 = 57.79. or approx. 58%

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 965
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: how can I improve my dough?
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2013, 09:49:24 AM »
Chase;
What is your starter comprised of? What are the amounts that go into making the 98-grams?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Online chasenpse

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 361
  • Location: New York
    • Battle Hill Media
Re: how can I improve my dough?
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2013, 12:41:34 PM »
Thanks for explaining that one to me Pete-zza, it always confused me.

Chase;
What is your starter comprised of? What are the amounts that go into making the 98-grams?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

My culture is just AP flour and water, I followed a youtube video of Nancy Silverton's grape starter to create it and feed it equal parts water/flour, roughly 70-80g of each every time I feed it. Another thing to note is that I started to keep my starter in the fridge since the beginning of summer but I don't feel it's affected it's ability, they're a tough bunch of bacteria :) I do let it come to room temp and feed it at least once prior to use.
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline adm

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 196
  • Location: Surrey, UK
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: how can I improve my dough?
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2013, 04:53:21 PM »
That just seems like a massive amount of starter to me. It's about 20%. I would cut it back significantly.

If it's even halfway active and you ferment it for 24 hours, even fairly cold it will probably be pretty far gone.

Have a look at Craig's Neo dough thread - he used less than 2% starter for a 48 hour dough at room temp (65F), but if you want a 24 hour dough you could adjust accordingly.

However - if it works for you, then keep at it!  :)

Online chasenpse

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 361
  • Location: New York
    • Battle Hill Media
Re: how can I improve my dough?
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2013, 05:53:04 PM »
That just seems like a massive amount of starter to me. It's about 20%. I would cut it back significantly.

If it's even halfway active and you ferment it for 24 hours, even fairly cold it will probably be pretty far gone.

Have a look at Craig's Neo dough thread - he used less than 2% starter for a 48 hour dough at room temp (65F), but if you want a 24 hour dough you could adjust accordingly.

However - if it works for you, then keep at it!  :)

I had a feeling I was using too much, excuse my newbieness i'm fairly new to baking in general. I'm going to experiment and see what happens. Since i've been doing cold ferments I can't really tell when the dough is past it's peak but from my bread making adventures I found after about 12 hours the dough was overproofed and wouldn't rise as much. Then again that could be because I was using so much starter that it proofed too fast, is that possible?

Anyways, here's a shot of the bottom of some dough I made earlier this week.
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Online chasenpse

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 361
  • Location: New York
    • Battle Hill Media
Re: how can I improve my dough?
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2013, 09:12:28 PM »
That just seems like a massive amount of starter to me. It's about 20%. I would cut it back significantly.

If it's even halfway active and you ferment it for 24 hours, even fairly cold it will probably be pretty far gone.

Have a look at Craig's Neo dough thread - he used less than 2% starter for a 48 hour dough at room temp (65F), but if you want a 24 hour dough you could adjust accordingly.

However - if it works for you, then keep at it!  :)

This has gotten me thinking, I'd like to continue doing cold ferments since I don't bake all too often and it gives me time to plan accordingly. What would be a good percent of starter to use? Would 10% still be too much for a 48-72hr cold ferment, or should I go lower, perhaps 5%? I guess what I'm really trying to figure out is what is the deciding factor on how much starter to use?
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.


 

pizzapan