Author Topic: My first attempt  (Read 1734 times)

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Offline Locke

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My first attempt
« on: February 25, 2006, 10:32:39 PM »
I started sourdough bread baking at about the same time I found this wonderful site so I decided to use my homemade starter in my first attempt at making a New York style dough. I modified a Lehmann style dough posted by pete-zza and came up with

100% Bread flour(KA)
55% Water
42% Homemade starter with a hydration of about 100%
2.2% Salt
1.2% Oil

Taking into account the hydration of the starter my total hydration was 63%.

Kneaded 30oz of dough by hand to make two 12oz balls and one 6oz. Baked the first 12oz after a 17hour refrigerator rise followed by 6 hours at room temp and was quite pleased with the results for a first attempt. The second dough ball ended up a bit of a disaster when I placed the back edge of the 12in pizza in the middle of my 13in stone. Baked the 6oz ball today after 65hours in the fridge and 3hours at room temp and was absolutely delighted with the results.  ;D
This was also the first time using the Bel Gioioso cryopak mozzarella which I am pleased with.

Here's some pics of the 3rd pizza. The thickness factor was 0.09 and I baked it on a stone at the bottom of a 550F oven.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2006, 10:37:42 PM by Locke »


Online Pete-zza

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2006, 10:40:25 PM »
Locke,

I'm glad to see you and other members are using preferments with the basic Lehmann NY dough formulation. I think it takes the Lehmann dough and pizza to a new level.

Did I correctly read 12% oil, or did you mean 1.2% oil?

Peter

Online Pete-zza

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2006, 10:43:05 PM »
Oops. Just after I posted I saw that you edited your post to correct the amount of oil. You had me worried there for a moment ;D.

Was there a particular reason why you settled on 42% preferment? And what was the taste of the crust like?

Peter
« Last Edit: February 25, 2006, 10:47:31 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Locke

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2006, 12:03:04 AM »
Pete,

Don't worry I save most of the oil for deep dish pizzas  :P

I ended up with 42% preferment just because that was the amount of active starter I had left out after making bread that day. Very scientific eh? As for crust flavour it was relatively mild but much nicer than the store bought dough I'd been using previously.  Although to be honest I was too busy going "omg this is good!" and working on my glutony to really critique individual flavour components.  :-[

Mentioning the store bought dough also reminds me how easy this dough was to work with compared to it. I could stretch this dough to whatever thickness I wanted and was never worried about it ripping.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2006, 12:31:04 AM »
Locke,

The reason I asked about the percent of preferment is because I recently made a take-and-bake version of the Lehmann dough in which I used 40% of the flour and 40% of the water to make a poolish which was then combined (after a long room temperature fermentation) with the rest of the dough. I selected 40% because it fell in between the typical range of 20-80% used in bread making. What I discoverd is that the crust had what I would best describe as a baguette crust flavor. It was very nice but different from what I have gotten when I have used my natural preferment, at about 20%, with the Lehmann dough. I am beginning to think that when bread making principles are applied to the pizza realm, the pizzas start to move in the direction of bread.

Peter

Offline RockyMarciano

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2006, 09:25:08 PM »
what is take and bake, and how do i make a starter?? What is a starter and why should i use it.  does it taste better?

Offline chiguy

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2006, 09:57:55 PM »
 Hi Rocky,
 A take and bake pizza is a mostly a francise concept, where a raw pizza skin is dressed on a disposable baking tray then wrapped in sulaphane. A customer than takes the pizza home and bakes it in their own oven at the convenience. You can probably see the concept at www.papamurphys.com, which seems to be the most popular.  I had the unfortunate experience of trying this pizza at a friends house, it is pure grease, combined with a pastey sauce, non authentic cheese. An over all bad experience from my point of view. A take and bake pizza has lower finished dough temp(72-80F) lower yeast levels 0.25%.
 I hope Peter does not mind me addressing this general question, he seems to be overloaded at times.
 I hope this covers it, the poolish and the starters are covered in the Glossary section of the forum.    Chiguy   
 

Online Pete-zza

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2006, 10:31:12 PM »
Chiguy,

Thanks. Your help is always welcome.

Rocky,

You may recall that you responded to one of my posts on take-and-bake. But to help refresh your memory and to learn more about take-and-bake, you can take a look at Replies 343, 349 and 362 (plus some follow-on posts), starting at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.340.html on the Lehmann thread.

To learn about starters, you might want to take a look at the section of the forum called "Starters/Sponges". I personally think that starters (preferments) are a very useful addition to pizza dough making, but they are fairly complicated to learn and understand and they require a fairly serious commitment to use. You will better understand what I am saying when you look at the abovementioned section on starters/sponges. You might also find it helpful to take a look at the Pizza Glossary, especially terms like preferment, starter, sourdough, levain, sponge, poolish, biga, pate fermentee, chef, and old dough. Most of these terms come from breadmaking but can be applied also to pizza dough making.

Peter



« Last Edit: February 26, 2006, 10:36:51 PM by Pete-zza »


 

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