Author Topic: Dual oven effect when using large baking surfaces  (Read 2974 times)

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Offline JD

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Re: Dual oven effect when using large baking surfaces
« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2013, 09:15:34 PM »
Outside of all the technical info I've cooked tons of pizzas on steel plate in my gas fired oven with no issues, and I've used the same plate in family's electric oven with near identical results.

Well if you've actually used both then that's a strong argument in your favor.

 


Offline shuboyje

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Re: Dual oven effect when using large baking surfaces
« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2013, 09:22:17 PM »
Now we've gotten to the bottom of it.  That's what I was missing.  Using thermal mass without a way to measure it's temperature is going to be a crap shoot.  You oven does not use a 500F heat source to heat to 500F, it uses an burner or element at a much higher temperature.  This leaves the potential for thermal mass to become hotter then the thermostat set point.  Then factor in your home oven does not run on a PID that maintains a 0.1F temperature range, it's thermostat probably turns on the burner 10F bellow the set point and turns it off 10F above.  You've got 20F of swing right there. 

Again leaving the land of theory, in my oven my plate is always hotter then the thermostat set point when I turn off the bake element.  My oven goes to 525, and my plate is generally around 565.   
-Jeff

Offline JD

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Re: Dual oven effect when using large baking surfaces
« Reply #27 on: September 16, 2013, 09:32:05 PM »
Again leaving the land of theory, in my oven my plate is always hotter then the thermostat set point when I turn off the bake element.  My oven goes to 525, and my plate is generally around 565.


So there it is, although I do not know my steel temp I know my lower chamber temp is about 40* higher than my upper where the thermocouple is. Yes I'm having a hard time leaving the land of theory, but it's compelling theoretical evidence isn't it  ::)

When you used the electric oven, did you take IR temps of your steel?

I appreciate the input, you're well respected on this forum for a reason.

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Dual oven effect when using large baking surfaces
« Reply #28 on: September 16, 2013, 09:38:31 PM »
Yeah, I took IR readings in the electric oven also.  IR guns, don't leave home without one, lol.
-Jeff

scott123

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Re: Dual oven effect when using large baking surfaces
« Reply #29 on: September 17, 2013, 09:07:57 AM »
Scott, have you ground your teeth away yet?

No teeth grinding here.  You just want to completely understand what's going on. I get it.  Btw, I haven't used my steel as much as Jeff, but I have used it in a gas and an electric oven and results have been pretty much identical.  I've used an IR thermometer, though to confirm the temps are the same.

The one thing I'd be careful about with using steel for the first time in an electric oven is the broiler.  In my experience, gas broilers tend to be substantially weaker than electric.  With my broiler, if the broiler is on (red) for more than half of the 4 minute bake, the top burns, but on the gas oven I've used, having the broiler on for the duration seemed to work well. Also, this is a bit theoretical, but I believe that the further you place the plate from the broiler, the more even/less contrasty the browning. You can't place the plate so far, though, that the top doesn't bake fast enough. I haven't tried this yet, but, instead of using my broiler at a distance of 6" for half the bake, I might try a distance of 8" for the whole bake.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2013, 09:11:08 AM by scott123 »

Offline JD

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Re: Dual oven effect when using large baking surfaces
« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2013, 09:37:20 AM »
I've used an IR thermometer, though to confirm the temps are the same.

If you remember, were your steel temps equal to your oven set temp too?

Offline JD

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Re: Dual oven effect when using large baking surfaces
« Reply #31 on: November 05, 2013, 12:16:32 PM »
As an update to this thread for future reference, I learned why I am getting this dual oven effect.

I found last night that my steel is just barely too wide so the oven door is actually cracked open. It is not noticeable by eye, but it is by feel since it is unusually hot by the top and sides of the door. Since the door is left cracked open, heat escapes the top "oven" and in return makes the oven cycle more frequently which causes a really hot environment in the lower "oven".

Feels good to finally close the door on this one.

Pun intended.



 

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