Author Topic: Upper limit of fermenting temperatures?  (Read 519 times)

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Offline bbqchuck

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Upper limit of fermenting temperatures?
« on: September 25, 2013, 01:31:29 PM »
I was wondering how high I can ferment emergency dough without adverse effects.  I'm trying to accelerate the fermentation of a normally 2 hr room temperature dough.  I've been successful at 95-100F in shortening it to 1 1/2 hrs


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Upper limit of fermenting temperatures?
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2013, 01:53:00 PM »
Baker's yeast activity peaks around 95F. As you go much hotter, activity will start to slow rapidly. You can get an idea what it looks like here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26831.msg271628.html#msg271628
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Upper limit of fermenting temperatures?
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2013, 02:21:31 PM »
Chuck,

To see Tom's recommendations on making an emergency dough, see http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=5037&p=29594&hilit=#p29594. If you are using IDY and you stir it into the flour, you should be able to use water at a temperature of a bit more than 120 degrees F. You can also increase the amount of yeast even beyond what would normally be used for an emergency dough but you might end up with some off or strange flavors (due to bacterial performance) and you may experience excessive bubbling of the dough and finished crust.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 25, 2013, 02:26:40 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: Upper limit of fermenting temperatures?
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2013, 02:47:11 PM »
So, really just dumb luck I hit the peak temp with my then seemingly conservative temperature swag.

I'm using a 1/2 tsp (a bit more than .7%) of IDY with 202 grms of 13+% gluten flour (63% hydration, no sugar, 1% EVOO, 1.75% salt) now.  How far can I go with increasing IDY before things go funky?
« Last Edit: September 25, 2013, 02:51:09 PM by bbqchuck »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Upper limit of fermenting temperatures?
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2013, 03:04:20 PM »
One thing to note, the temperature of the dough will not shoot straight to 95F+, so given that you want to only ferment for a very short time, you might experiment at temps 100+. If you use warm water as Peter commented, check the final temperature of the dough and use that info in your fermentation temp decision as to how high to go.
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Upper limit of fermenting temperatures?
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2013, 03:11:56 PM »
Chuck,

For yeast limit, I would suggest something around 0.80% IDY. You can always adjust later if the results call for adjustment. Professor Raymond Calvel used to say that you could taste fresh yeast in a baked good once it got to 2%. Converting that to IDY would be about 0.70%. I don't know if that is a proper correlation but it is something you might test.

Here is another item to read about emergency doughs: http://www.pizzatoday.com/magazine/emergency-dough

Peter

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: Upper limit of fermenting temperatures?
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2013, 03:16:45 PM »
Craig,
Yeah, water was my first thought when I made the dough last night.  I got lazy and bumped the oven on a short while (30-45 seconds) and thru in my Thermapen.  I shoulda used warm water to get the transfer and set the whole thing in the warm oven to maintain it.

On a similar note, my brother has a couple portable AC/DC refrigerators (cooler looking), that go from freezing to warm temps.  I think his are ARB brand.  Pricey, but might be handy for all this fermenting temperature control stuff.

http://www.amazon.com/ARB-10800472-Fridge-Freezer--Quart/dp/B002Q1INDM/?tag=pizzamaking-20

OOOPS, apparently the new ones don't get warm.  His old metal one goes from over 100F to below freezing.