Author Topic: Steve's quick & easy NY pie  (Read 36359 times)

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Offline November

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #80 on: November 19, 2006, 04:33:23 PM »
husker3in4,

Unless you changed the cup data from default to something else, you should get 2 1/3 cup + 1 T + 2 t. Did you use a different measuring cup depth?

- red.november

EDIT: I just realized that you didn't choose Sir Lancelot from the list.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2006, 04:43:38 PM by November »

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #81 on: November 19, 2006, 11:06:47 PM »
That is correct, I used the KA bread flour in the calculations.


Offline November

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #82 on: November 19, 2006, 11:30:57 PM »
I thought you were going to use high-gluten flour.

Offline husker3in4

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #83 on: November 21, 2006, 05:42:21 PM »
KA Bread Flour is the highest gluten flour I had. I did just get some KASL in the mail today tho..

I also asked if anyone has mix times etc for using this recipe with a KA mixer, anyone?

Offline Lydia

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #84 on: November 22, 2006, 02:47:50 AM »
I am kneading the dough on speed 3 for about 2 minuteswith the Spiral hook. It should take a bit longer with the C-hook (guess-timate: 8 minutes).

(Keep in mind that KitchenAid does not condone mixing yeast doughs above speed 2.)

My methods are outline in reply #29 Page 3 in this thread.

Be sure to check out Peters reply #31 about stiring manually in place of using the paddle. There was a obvious difference in dough characteristics.
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Offline tcarlisle

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #85 on: February 23, 2014, 11:53:02 AM »
I made this dough last weekend and again last night, using KABF, using the quantities specific, and it is a very fine dough for quick needs. No, the flavor isn't going to be as developed as a 3 day cold ferment, but this is far from bland. In fact, I bet if I put this side-by-side with a 3 day cold ferment lehman dough, most people wouldn't tell the difference. I doubt there is a better quick dough out there. As far as technique, I use a kitchen aid stand mixer, and I used the dough hook for a couple minutes, then quite a bit of hand kneading. Then into a lightly greased rubbermaid 1 qt container with air tight lid. Then I put it in a slighly warm place for a few hours.

Offline Jacobus Maximus

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #86 on: April 02, 2014, 09:47:09 PM »
Re: Reply #66

Pete-

So, are you saying that "Rapid-Rise" yeast can be used exactly like IDY in the recipes on this site?
I told, er asked, my wife to get some IDY the last time she went grocery shopping and this is what she came home with. I've got me Gold Medal Better for Bread and I'm looking forward to diving into your Lehmann's NY recipe...

Thx

Offline waynesize

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #87 on: April 02, 2014, 09:55:20 PM »
If you look at the lower left portion of the label, you will see it says "Instant Dry Yeast". I believe it is what it is.  :)

Wayne

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #88 on: April 02, 2014, 10:02:15 PM »
Jacobus Maximus,

Waybe beat me to the punch. The Red Star Quick Rise yeast is indeed IDY, as are all such yeast products intended to be used with bread making machines.

Pretty much all brands of IDY are engineered to be interchangeable. Tom Lehmann makes this point about IDY in his post at Reply 12 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26029.msg262511;topicseen#msg262511 .

Peter

Offline carl333

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #89 on: December 17, 2014, 01:28:10 PM »
Dough Recipe

10.7 oz. (by weight) high gluten flour

Would bread flour be considerd high gluten?   tks
Carl


Offline vtsteve

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #90 on: December 18, 2014, 06:54:24 AM »
Most bread flour would not be considered high gluten (13.5%+). However, in the 8 years since that post, the generally-accepted sweet spot for protein on the forum has come down into the bread flour range (12-13%).

Offline carl333

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #91 on: January 01, 2015, 03:00:46 PM »
Dough Recipe

10.7 oz. (by weight) high gluten flour
7.4 oz. (by weight) cold water
3/4 tsp. salt
3/4 tsp. instant dry yeast

Sauce Recipe

28 oz. can 6 in 1 ground tomatoes
28 oz. can Bonta pizza sauce with Basil
28 oz. can water
2 grams dried oregano
4 grams black pepper
4 grams granulated garlic
4 grams granulated onion
8 grams salt

Cheese mix

1/3 part shredded provolone
2/3 part shredded mozzarella


The sauce can be made up ahead of time. Mix all ingredients and store in an airtight container.

For the dough, add flour and cold water to the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel cutting blade. Pulse several times until a cohesive dough ball forms (no raw flour can be seen.) Stop and let dough rest for 30 minutes. After the 30 minute autolyze period, turn food processor on and add the salt and yeast through the feed tube. Continue processing (kneading) the dough for approximately 30 seconds (the dough should feel warm to the touch.) Remove the dough from the bowl and briefly knead (you may have to use a little bench flour to keep the dough from sticking to you and/or the counter.) Shape the dough into a ball, lightly coat with olive oil, and place in a sealed container to rise. Allow to rise in a warm place for two hours.

After the two hour rise, remove the dough from the container being careful not to deform the ball. Place the dough ball on the counter and press then stretch into shape using your fists. Place dough on a makeup board (or peel), sauce, cheese, and top. Bake on a pizza stone in a preheated 550 degree F. oven until golden brown.

This pizza has a wonderful flavor even though it has a short rise time. Everyone who has tried it absolutely loves the flavor and the texture of the crust. The sauce is excellent at well. This pizza is very much like the "street" pizza of NYC (IMHO) and is quick and easy to make.

Makes one 16" pizza.

Steve  :chef:

Everyone needs an emergency pizza dough recipe. Tried it yesterday with fantastic results. This one is a keeper for sure. Ya the dough is bland but what can you really expect. Tks Steve

Cooked in 500 oven in a Lodge cast iron pizza pan. That's all I got for now.
Carl

Offline CakeM1x

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #92 on: January 21, 2015, 08:48:36 AM »
My first pie ever on my new bakerstone was too hot(got it up to 900+ degrees which I didn't think was possible in my weber) and charred the bottom black. Gave it another go with adjustments last night and it turned out great! This is the first dough recipe I've tried so I have nothing to compare it to but it was still delicious.

Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #93 on: January 21, 2015, 10:40:23 AM »
My first pie ever on my new bakerstone was too hot(got it up to 900+ degrees which I didn't think was possible in my weber) and charred the bottom black. Gave it another go with adjustments last night and it turned out great! This is the first dough recipe I've tried so I have nothing to compare it to but it was still delicious.

    Real nice Cake!    Keep up the good work... :chef:
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Offline saab92x

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Re: Steve's quick & easy NY pie
« Reply #94 on: January 30, 2015, 08:48:35 PM »
 I made the pizza following your ingredients and instructions tonight, or at least that was the intention. I tried my best to replicate it with what I had around the house. I'm new to making pizza so it was quite the adventure.

I used cold spring water and king arthur all purpose flour, it's just what I had around the house. For the yeast, I didn't have IDY so I used ADY, it did say on the package that ADY probably shouldn't be used a substitute for IDY (Also said to dissolve the ADY in water, which I didn't listen to and ran into troubles with later), but I mean it probably has to say that for health reasons and I don't think it means anything. So I added double the yeast you called for. At this point though, I ran into more trouble.

 I had tried adding the yeast and salt after letting the dough autolyze for fifteen minutes (you said to wait thirty, but I wasn't convinced you didn't make that word up so I figured fifteen minutes was more than enough time), but I don't have a mixer. Well I do but I didn't feel like breaking it out cause I would have to clean it.  The dough was kinda smooth on the outside at this point, not sticky at all. I made a cute little hole in the dough with my finger, poured the salt and yeast neatly into the hole, and then folded the dough over it and proceeded with kneading it. But the yeast and the salt did wouldn't dissolve in the dough, I could feel the grains through the dough as I kneaded it, and I thought I could hear them shaking around in the dough like a maraca. I picked the dough up and shook it next to my ear to confirm this. I didn't hear anything though so I was pretty sure it hadn't actually formed a dough/yeast-salt maraca.

 I soldiered on, but then yeast and salt had actually started falling out from the dough en masse into my mixing bowl, and I realized the maraca theory was right. I was awfully flustered at this point, but I was at the point of no return. I made a battle field decision, found the tear in the dough where  the salt and yeast had been coming out of, stretched it open and added some water from the sink into the wound hoping it would help dissolve the remaining yeast and salt into the dough. I added just a small amount but it made the whole dough sticky again, I was pissed but I was able to take use of the stickiness to absorb the yeast and salt that had fallen out of the dough back into it, so it worked out. I then proceeded to knead the dough with my hands until I determined it was done, and set it in a bowl with a towel over it to rise for 3 hours.

That was the end of my troubles though, once it was done I spread that bad boy out topped it, and threw it in the oven at 500 for about 10 minutes, and what came out was an awesome pizza. I don't know how it happened given how hard I tried to ruin it, but it was really good. I've never really ate a homemade pizza that I liked, but I really liked this one. It inspired me to make this account and post this long winded story here.

I couldn't get a picture of the whole pizza as everyone in my house was quick to dismantle it, but here's a picture of a slice.
(http://i.imgur.com/Brq7FyB.jpg)

And an obligatory crust pic:
(http://i.imgur.com/xLPkNNg.jpg)