Author Topic: My new used oven  (Read 2953 times)

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Offline hungry one

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My new used oven
« on: March 03, 2006, 12:05:27 AM »
I just bought it,gonna get it hooked up next week ,said it works good but i fogot ask the make. Will post results when i cook my first pizza


Offline hungry one

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Re: My new used oven
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2006, 10:43:28 PM »
its a p1 bakers pride,still mixing  by hand (kitchenaid blew up with this formula)
2 tsp sugar
220 gr water
1.5 tsp ady
let stand for .5 hour tap temperature unknown I let it sit on the oven till its risen
fill container with 4 tsp kosher salt and water to equal 1450 grams
add flour to 2535 grams stir in .25 cup vegetable oil about 55 % hydrat
bought a 18  in wood peel from Hendricks arrived today
want to try the corn meal on the peel and cooking on the deck
oven only goes to 450 degrees full blast
can I do this with this formula if I omit the sugar and still mix by hand
any suggestions  very small community of old people including me




 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My new used oven
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2006, 09:21:36 AM »
hungry one,

If I got all your numbers right, it looks like you are making almost nine pounds of dough, which would be a lot of dough to knead entirely by hand, even for standard (low protein/gluten) flour as is available where you are in Canada. Whether you should omit the sugar is entirely up to you. It isn't needed to produce good results.

As for the way you are re-hydrating the ADY, I would like to suggest that you do it as follows: Put the ADY in about a quarter of a cup of water at around 105 degrees F, without the sugar, and let the ADY rehydrate for no longer than 15 minutes. Going beyond 15 minutes increases the risk that glutathione (a reducing amino acid) will leach from the ADY and result in a sticky and slack dough. Adding the sugar to the ADY for the entire time of re-hydration will only aggravate this effect. When you are ready to use the hydrated ADY, I would add the salt to the remaining water and stir to dissolve, and then add the re-hydrated ADY.

Peter

Offline hungry one

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Re: My new used oven
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2006, 01:39:19 AM »
what should my end result be

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My new used oven
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2006, 09:53:01 AM »
hungry one,

To a certain extent the results you get will depend on the thickness of the "skins" and their size (diameter) and your bake protocol (oven temperature and time). I have taken the numbers you gave and converted them to baker's percents as follows:

100%, Flour, 2525 g.
56.4%, Water, 1420.80 g. (calculated by subtracting weight of salt from 1450 g.)
0.76%, Kosher salt, 19.20 g. (assumes Morton's brand of coarse Kosher salt)
0.32%, Sugar, 7.97 g.
0.22%, Active dry yeast (ADY), 5.67 g.
2.2%, Oil, 56 g.
Total dough weight = 4054.64 g. (8.94 lbs.)

If you intend to cold ferment the dough, I would suggest increasing the amount of ADY a bit (e.g., by another 1/2 t.), (and by even more if you intend to do a room-temperature rise). Also, I would be inclined to increase the salt a bit (by another teaspoon or so) since it is on the low side. Making these two changes should produce a dough that should give good results, with decent extensibility, dough handling characteristics, and useful life span (up to 3 days of refrigeration). Usually when dough is to be baked in a commercial deck oven, the sugar is eliminated from the dough formulation to prevent the bottom crust from darkening excessively or prematurely. However, since your sugar content is low, I don't think that it should pose much of a problem. If it does, you can use screens and "deck" the pizzas (shift them off of the screens onto the stone) toward the end of the bake. Since you have a top limit of 450 degrees for your oven (I am assuming Fahrenheit), you will have to experiment with skin thickness, size, and bake time. As an example, if you want to use your new 18-inch peel to make a 16-inch pizza with a NY style thickness (e.g., 010 thickness factor), you would use a dough ball weight of 570 g. (3.14159 x 8 x 8 x 0.10 x 28.35). This would be equivalent to 20.11 oz.

Let us know how things work out, including the performance of your "new used oven".

Peter

Offline hungry one

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Re: My new used oven
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2006, 09:11:24 PM »
Find this oven at 450 degrees toooo hot in the kitchen.What are you using that doesnt overheat the kitchen or any suggestions.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My new used oven
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2006, 09:23:27 PM »
hungry one,

There's not much that I can think to do with an oven like yours to overcome the kitchen heat problem. If you have a standard home oven you can make pizzas on a pizza screen. Because you need only to get the oven to an ambient temperature of about 450-500 degrees F, there is no need to preheat a stone (which I assume you have in your new old oven) for an hour or so. In my home oven, it takes only 12-15 minutes to get the ambient temperature to around 450-500 degrees F. And the oven will cool down almost as fast as it heated up. With a stone, there is a lot of remnant heat that has to be dissipated as it cools down, and that can take some time.

Another option, of course, is to use some sort of grill arrangement outdoors.

Peter

Offline jrceo

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Re: My new used oven
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2006, 12:16:02 PM »
Hungry one , hi read your ad on your new oven, I think it too TOO big for such a low temp 450 f is really low for such a size of pizza oven, pizza for thought hungry one, (pete eezza your thoughts please)I bought a table top commerical oven from wesco inc, out of oregan it small and it only goes up to 450f on high heat its a 3 inch opening which allows for riseing dough to bake perfectly, you might consider an oven from wesco hungry one., pete this is for you ,have you ever used a flash bake oven for cooking pizza , hobart and vulcan claim that there pizza or any food for that matter
when cooked in there flashbaked ovens will NOT make soggy foods, they claim that the results are professional and it leaves the food crisp.
umm i wondering if your ever cooked in a flashbaked oven,have you ? if so how did you feel about the final product?

good luck hungry one..

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My new used oven
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2006, 04:17:06 PM »
jrceo,

hungry one didn't say, but knowing that he is in Canada it's possible that he meant 450 degrees C, not F. That would be around 840 degrees F. But even that seems high for a commercial oven like he has shown in his photo.

I am not familiar with the flash bake ovens and, hence, have never used one.

Peter


 

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