Author Topic: Thin and flexible dough  (Read 1575 times)

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Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2014, 10:27:27 PM »
Thanks Mitch...I always get that ass backwards. Even though I just did the calculation(accurately) just yesterday at Sam's Club on their Bakers and Chefs bread flour sacks.  ::)

Bob
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Offline shari23

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #21 on: March 03, 2014, 10:27:27 PM »
Ok, thank you...

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2014, 05:06:33 AM »
Sorry Bob.  4 grams of protein in a 30 gram serving is 4/30 = 13.33%.

Also, I recommend you guys see the thread that Peter discussed:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30417.msg303328#msg303328

You will see that the actual protein %, when the stated number of grams is 4, is somewhere in a pretty wide range.  Rounding off to the nearest gram makes it pretty impossible to use the information.

- Mitch


ignore the nutritional facts. find hard data on the protein content of the flour either by google or calling pillsbury (or whatever manufacturer) that you are buying the flour from.

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Offline shari23

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2014, 01:58:55 PM »
Ok, I made a pizza with bread flour 4 grams, 31 grams  which I quess would be 12.9grams of protein.  The crust was more flexible, able to fold when eating.  My problem was stretching out thin.  I let rise in a warm place for 1 hour and then started with a ball and rolled in flour and used the method with my fingers in a circular manner then knuckles.  Even picked up to stretch.  Just couldn't get it stretched out enough, a little on the thicker side.  I quess it takes alot of practice, just don't want to use a rolling pin.  The other half of dough I am refrigerating overnight and will try again tomorrow to stretch out into a pizza. I even baked it at the highest temp my over would go 500 2nd rack up from bottom on a stone.  How big a difference does a pizza oven make?

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #24 on: March 04, 2014, 02:29:04 PM »
Ok, I made a pizza with bread flour 4 grams, 31 grams  which I quess would be 12.9grams of protein.  The crust was more flexible, able to fold when eating.  My problem was stretching out thin.  I let rise in a warm place for 1 hour and then started with a ball and rolled in flour and used the method with my fingers in a circular manner then knuckles.  Even picked up to stretch.  Just couldn't get it stretched out enough, a little on the thicker side.  I quess it takes alot of practice, just don't want to use a rolling pin.  The other half of dough I am refrigerating overnight and will try again tomorrow to stretch out into a pizza. I even baked it at the highest temp my over would go 500 2nd rack up from bottom on a stone.  How big a difference does a pizza oven make?

one hour just isn't enough time to let the dough go lax enough to stretch
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.

Offline shari23

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2014, 07:44:12 PM »
Pizza getting better with Bread flour, stored dough overnight in frig. Felt like a wimp, rolled it out with a rolling pin.

Offline Qapla

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #26 on: March 11, 2014, 08:06:36 PM »
I find that placing the pizza on the bottom of a home oven on the stone, or whatever you are using, gets a crisper crust. Placing the pie closer to the top cooks the toppings more - crust somewhat less.

Pizza deck ovens cook the pizza on the floor of the oven.