Author Topic: Trying this one last time - Where can I find that delicious cheese used in NY?  (Read 16153 times)

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Offline Hobbs

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I've cheated on Miss Grande so many times....only to come back to her loving embrace.


Offline Zing

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Yet another wholesale distributor, based in Nassau County, NY:

C & F Foods Company, Inc.
30 Gordon Drive
Syosset, NY 11791

Their trucks advertise their "Papa Moozzi" mozzarella cheese. Probably wholesale only.

Offline chasenpse

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Sorry, I don't have the experience to be able to tell one what the better brands are. However, I would like to try the Krohn and Galbani loaf cheese. Krohn has been discussed on this forum in other threads. Galbani foodservice was marketed as a premium cheese by Lactalis, before they put the Galbani name on all the Sorrento products in the supermarket. This video sparked my interest back in 2012:

For all I know it is rebadged Sorrento Buffalo (NY), but if you watch the other old "Galbani Tales" videos on the Lactalis Culinary channel you get the impression this is a premium line of cheeses.
Man this video brought back a lot of memories. A lot of drunken stupers ended up with a slice of cold cheese pizza :-D Great idea in the moment, not so fun the day after.
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline amiart

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So when it became one company which companies product won over, the superior/premium one or the inferior ?

Offline David Esq.

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I grate a blend of: fresh mozzarella, reggio parmigano and provolone, and I get a flavor that really knocks my socks off. I live in New York and, for the most part, prefer my own pizza to the pizzeria pizzas.

Offline Arctic Pizza

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I grate a blend of: fresh mozzarella, reggio parmigano and provolone, and I get a flavor that really knocks my socks off. I live in New York and, for the most part, prefer my own pizza to the pizzeria pizzas.

I have also found using 3 cheeses such as your combination of cheeses works really well.  I don't know what has happened to US cows in the past 20 years, perhaps the feed they eat switching from grass to mostly grain pellets, and/or pasteurization process, but the low moisture whole milk mozzerellas have significantly less flavor and butterfat % than the past so I cut in more of some other cheeses for flavor.  I made a pie today with buffalo mozzerella, grande low moisture, and freshly grated 18 month sharp imported reggiano parmegianno and it has a great flavor.

btw, even Cheese Wiz brand changed.  I remember watching a show on Philly Cheesesteaks, and the owner of one of the famous steak joints was complaining that his customers were saying the Cheese Wiz didn't taste the same anymore.

« Last Edit: November 10, 2014, 04:15:54 PM by Arctic Pizza »

Offline David Esq.

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I don't use low moisture mozzarella. Just the stuff that comes wrapped tight in an 8-16 ounce ball.  Sometimes it is moister than others, but never is it as dry as the poly-O low moisture cheeses I've seen.  Not really sure why that cheese is used but I expect it has a lot less flavor than the fresh mozzarella.

Offline Arctic Pizza

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I don't use low moisture mozzarella. Just the stuff that comes wrapped tight in an 8-16 ounce ball.  Sometimes it is moister than others, but never is it as dry as the poly-O low moisture cheeses I've seen.  Not really sure why that cheese is used but I expect it has a lot less flavor than the fresh mozzarella.

I add a mix of low moisture and fresh buffalo mozzerella, which I prefer over fresh cows milk mozzerella along with reggiano, reason for the addition of low moisture is to add a textural balance to the fresh mozz as I like to bake at extreme temperatures and the fresh mozz will break down too quick.   Low moisture like polly-o or grande imparts little flavor but gives it nice tooth.

Offline JD

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I add a mix of low moisture and fresh buffalo mozzerella, which I prefer over fresh cows milk mozzerella along with reggiano, reason for the addition of low moisture is to add a textural balance to the fresh mozz as I like to bake at extreme temperatures and the fresh mozz will break down too quick.   Low moisture like polly-o or grande imparts little flavor but gives it nice tooth.

Do you add the fresh buffalo mozzarella to make NY street pizza, or the Neo-NY you've been talking about? It seems counter-intuitive to put any fresh mozz on "typical" NY style.
Josh

Offline David Esq.

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Do you add the fresh buffalo mozzarella to make NY street pizza, or the Neo-NY you've been talking about? It seems counter-intuitive to put any fresh mozz on "typical" NY style.
I only use fresh mozzarella, without regard to style of pizza.  That said, I wasn't sure I was making a new-ny pie.  I've been followign the formula I found in the New York Times from Robertas, replacing 1/2 the AP flour for white whole wheat, and using the Caputo 00 flour for the other half as recommended, and baking at 550 for 3 minutes then broiling on high for 3 minutes to get a pizza I am happy with.

Because I was buying pricey provolone and parmigano, I thought it would be silly not to use fresh mozzarella. 



Offline JD

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I only use fresh mozzarella, without regard to style of pizza.  That said, I wasn't sure I was making a new-ny pie.  I've been followign the formula I found in the New York Times from Robertas, replacing 1/2 the AP flour for white whole wheat, and using the Caputo 00 flour for the other half as recommended, and baking at 550 for 3 minutes then broiling on high for 3 minutes to get a pizza I am happy with.

Because I was buying pricey provolone and parmigano, I thought it would be silly not to use fresh mozzarella.

If you have no regard to style than keep doing what you like. I'm just talking in terms of typical NY street pizza where unless it's a NY "margarita", low moisture is most common. Caputo is also not for lower temp NY pizza but Neapolitan, which Robertas most closely resembles. Again, I'm talking specifically NY street style so I'm just trying to keep my question in context.
Josh

Offline Arctic Pizza

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Do you add the fresh buffalo mozzarella to make NY street pizza, or the Neo-NY you've been talking about? It seems counter-intuitive to put any fresh mozz on "typical" NY style.

Generally speaking there is no fresh buffalo mozzerella in typical NY street pies, they are typically low moisture mozzerella and sometimes cut-in with parmigiano reggiano or pecorino romano.  Tho, I have seen hybrid permutations over the years like some places will make a "margherita pie" on a NY style crust with fresh mozzerella.

Neapolitan-NY/American typically has fresh cow or buffalo milk mozerella and various other cheeses.   These pies are typically baked in coal ovens or smoking hot deck ovens >650 degrees and much shorter time, clocking in at around 4-5 minutes. 
« Last Edit: November 10, 2014, 06:29:03 PM by Arctic Pizza »

Offline David Esq.

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Plenty if Ny pizzerias use cheddar too. That may be the flavor being missed.

Offline jsaras

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Saputo Premium Gold mozz, made specifically for pizza, is excellent. Complex flavor and good melt.
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Offline mbrulato

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Saputo Premium Gold mozz, made specifically for pizza, is excellent. Complex flavor and good melt.

Sounds nice, Jonas.  Is it better than original Saputo or Frigo?  Where did you buy this?  I'd like to try it.
Mary Ann

Offline JD

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Saputo Premium Gold mozz, made specifically for pizza, is excellent. Complex flavor and good melt.

That's their top of the line stuff, I'd love to try it also:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,34092.msg339468.html#msg339468

Josh

Offline jsaras

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I get it at Restaurant Depot in Van Nuys. I haven't tried those other cheeses nor have I seen them on any shelf.  Its taste is noticeably better than Trader Joe's whole milk low moisture.  We make a lot of quesadillas with it, so that large loaf vanishes pretty quickly.
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline JD

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I get it at Restaurant Depot in Van Nuys. I haven't tried those other cheeses nor have I seen them on any shelf.  Its taste is noticeably better than Trader Joe's whole milk low moisture.  We make a lot of quesadillas with it, so that large loaf vanishes pretty quickly.

How much is it?
Josh

Offline jsaras

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I ditched the last receipt, but it's about $2.60/lb; considerably less expensive than the TJ cheese I was mostly using.
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline JD

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I ditched the last receipt, but it's about $2.60/lb; considerably less expensive than the TJ cheese I was mostly using.

Wow! I'm paying $3.60/lb for Sysco Whole Milk. I'm jealous.
Josh


 

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