Author Topic: Chase's Pizza Adventure  (Read 1742 times)

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Offline chasenpse

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Chase's Pizza Adventure
« on: October 07, 2013, 11:50:58 AM »
I've decided to create a thread to act as a visual timeline for my pizza making skills (or lack of). Feel free to comment/judge/question as you see fit, the goal here is to track my progress and hone my craft :chef:

To start, here's a pie from March 8th using my old dough formula -

    260g Flour
    130g Water
    98g Starter @ 100% Hydration
    5g Salt
    5g Honey
    7g Olive Oil

Divided into 2 balls.

58% Hydration, 20% starter (think that's enough?)

From what I remember the crust was thick and couldn't be stretched as far as I would have liked, probably due to using AP flour at the time.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2013, 12:08:09 PM by chasenpse »
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.


Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2013, 11:52:29 AM »
Here's another one from August 14th, this time I explored using caputo 00 with the broiler method. Not a great success but still a tasty failure.
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2013, 11:53:44 AM »
Crumb shot of a newer formula, still using 20% starter and AP flour but at this point I eliminated the honey and EVOO.
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2013, 11:55:26 AM »
These were from a party at my parents, I cooked them on a blazing hot gas grill on a pizza stone. I don't have shots of the bottom but they came out very dark, my guess is the direct flame under the stone was too hot and would have had better results from having the flames come only from the sides.
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2013, 11:58:16 AM »
Sept 20th - back to the broiler. I've got an old oven with a separate broiler compartment, the pie could have benefited from being rotated half way through the bake but the cornicione came out nicely. I think by now I dropped my starter % to 10 and began doing cold ferments for about 3-5 days, the pizza was soft. Ah, progress!
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2013, 12:00:13 PM »
Sept 23rd - still experimenting with cold ferments, made these for some friends that came over. The pesto pie was a hit :D
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2013, 12:02:19 PM »
Sept 30 - I think this is when I switched to a hi-protein flour, using KABF and cold ferments. I started making my pies differently taking care not to over-handle them and leave the rim as 'virgin' as possible, starting to resemble what I've been after.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2013, 12:11:41 PM by chasenpse »
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2013, 12:05:10 PM »
And ultimately this is where I'm at - these are from this past weekend using the following formula:

Two 240G dough balls -

276G KABF
156G Water
48G Starter @ 100% Hydration
5G Salt
60% Hydration, 10% Starter, 1.8% Salt
Total Weight: 485G

My next goal is to bump up the weight and give a 14" or 16" pie a shot, which will require a bigger peel  ;D
« Last Edit: October 07, 2013, 12:07:16 PM by chasenpse »
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2013, 08:41:46 PM »
These were from a party at my parents, I cooked them on a blazing hot gas grill on a pizza stone. I don't have shots of the bottom but they came out very dark, my guess is the direct flame under the stone was too hot and would have had better results from having the flames come only from the sides.

Easy fix: When baking in a grill, cover the bottom (and sides) of your stone with aluminum foil. It will keep the stone from absorbing so much of the intense bottom heat.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2013, 06:43:33 AM »
Thanks for the tip Ryan, I will definitely give that a shot next time I use the grill.
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.


Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2013, 07:47:19 PM »
My latest pie, this is one of three. One was pepperoni, another was red peppers, and the last one was broccoli. All three were cooked on a pizza stone at 500F. Unfortunately this was the only pic I could snap :( The cheese on this particular pie didn't quite melt the way I like, my guess is by the time the 3rd pie was being cooked my oven and stone weren't at the right temp. and I think there could have been more sauce. Everyone loved them regardless which always puts a smile on my face!
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline norma427

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2013, 08:26:36 PM »
Nick,

That is a nice looking pizza!

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2013, 11:54:23 AM »
Nick,

That is a nice looking pizza!

Norma

Thanks Norma!
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2013, 08:50:07 PM »
Just made two pies from dough I prepared on 10/15, this was a little experiment to see how slap and fold helps develop dough. One of the two balls made went into the fridge right after kneading for 15 minutes in a KA mixer and the second rested for 5 minutes, went through about 10ish slap and folds, and repeated for a total of 4 intervals before going in the fridge.

The first ball was pretty shaggy and didn't develop as nicely as the second, while the second was nice and smooth. They stayed in the fridge for 32 hours before being placed in a cooler for another 8 hours starting at about 50F and slowly through the day got up to 63F before I took them out to rest for 3 hours before use. The ball that went through the series of rests/slap and folds was vastly improved, I was very satisfied with the results. The cornicione bubbled up more, the crumb was open, and it put a smile on my face :) Definitely going to go through the extra time to slap and fold from now on. Anyways, here's some shots.

First two are the shaggy ball after mixing and before baking. 3 & 4 are the slap and folded ball. 5, 6 and 7 are the slap and folded dough, and the last is the shaggy dough.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2013, 08:51:59 PM by chasenpse »
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #14 on: October 28, 2013, 08:26:25 AM »
Pizza update - I forget who had mentioned it here but I've stopped doing cold ferments with my dough and I've seen the improvement. My new process is as follows -

1. Measure starter and lukewarm water, mix and let rest for a minute.
2. Gradually add flour until incorporated, then add salt.
3. Knead until dough comes off of sides of mixer, another minute or two.
4. Divide dough and let rest for 5 minutes.
5. Slap and fold dough a couple times, rest for 5 minutes, and repeat 4 times.
6. Ball dough and store in cooler for 15 hours. Initial cooler temp. is 46F, went up to 64F before I removed the dough.
7. Rest dough balls at room temp. for about 7 hours before baking.

I don't know if my brain is playing a cruel trick on me but my dough is softer, has a better crumb, and is bubbling up more than previously. Now my main problem is that when I stretch my skins they're getting too thin, perhaps I need to up the weight of my balls? The ones pictured are at 278G each for about 12~14" pies.

Constructive criticism is openly welcome here :)
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2013, 10:41:34 AM »
In order from least to most recent - Sausage pie, thanksgiving pie, what was left of a cheese pie, and a peppers & mushroom pie. There were no survivors.
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline norma427

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2013, 11:28:28 AM »
Nick,

All of your pizzas look delicious!  :drool:

Norma
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Offline pythonic

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2013, 04:31:07 PM »
I like how your crusts are getting better from start to finish.  I too had a very pale pie and finally got it darker on top which is just more eye candy for a pizza.  Keep making pies.

Nate
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Offline chasenpse

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2013, 08:43:14 AM »
Thanks Norma!

Nate - definitely, I feel with each pie I'm learning something new or improving on something I thought I knew. Each pie is a tasty experiment ;D
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Chase's Pizza Adventure
« Reply #19 on: December 11, 2013, 11:24:47 AM »
Thanks Norma!

Nate - definitely, I feel with each pie I'm learning something new or improving on something I thought I knew. Each pie is a tasty experiment ;D

Get used to that. I don't know how long you've been making pizza or how many you've made, but I've made thousands at home and I still experience AHA! moments pretty regularly. For example, a week or two ago I decided to raise my stone a couple rack positions for the first time ever. AHA! Immediately the tops of my pale NY style crusts got some nice brown color, and there didn't seem to be any new negative characteristics in other areas.

I've also had other AHA! moments recently that have contradicted previous AHA! moments. For example, I used to mix my NY style dough for a long time (10 or 15 minutes), which I imagine is probably consistent with how most people initially learn to do it. But for the last few years I've mixed NY style dough for 3 minutes. The switch to a short mix was an AHA! moment. I've always loved the results of the short mix, but lately I've been seeing some problems with the short mix, so I'm gradually increasing the mix time, which is kind of another AHA! moment. I mixed my latest batch for 5 minutes, and since that dough seemed to need more mixing, I'm gonna mix for 6 minutes next time. AHA! in progress?