Author Topic: White Whole Wheat  (Read 14281 times)

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Offline charbo

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #40 on: January 16, 2011, 07:30:31 PM »
I think VWG has about twice the absorbance of whole wheat, so compute hydration accordingly.  The amount of sugar that might be added to pizza dough is usually small enough that additional hydration would be minimal.

I stopped using VWG for three reasons:  (1) I realized that a well-made crust was chewy enough.  (2) I discovered that the stretch-and-fold has an amazing power to strengthen gluten.  It also traps a little more air, resulting in a lighter crust.  However, the strengthening effect of the S&F may not last as long as well-developed dough with VWG.  (3) I dropped down to 80% whole wheat, making VWG somewhat superfluous.  At 20% refined flour, the crust was noticeably lighter; and I didnít need the extra fiber in my diet.  The refined flour portion also dove-tails with the recommendation of using it on the bench. 

The only reason I added sugar was to assure yeast food for the long, cool fermentation.  It was probably unnecessary.  Some people like sugar in some form, like honey or orange juice, to mask bitterness that might otherwise be apparent in whole wheat.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 10:49:43 PM by charbo »


Offline izzi

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #41 on: January 16, 2011, 09:06:03 PM »
Great information.  I'm a little confused with the VWG needed for the following test pizza's and also the change in the hydration then. ???  My thought here was to get about 2 - 8 ounce dough balls for small pizzas.

Preferment:
64 gm flour
53 gm water (83%)
0.32 gm tsp IDY (.5%)


Flour (100%):    211.65 g  |  7.47 oz | 0.47 lbs
Water (83%):    175.67 g  |  6.2 oz | 0.39 lbs
IDY (.5%):            1.06 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.35 tsp | 0.12 tbsp
Salt (1.4%):    2.96 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.53 tsp | 0.18 tbsp
Oil (3%):            6.35 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.41 tsp | 0.47 tbsp
Sugar (1.5%):    3.17 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.8 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
VWG   ??
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 10:19:29 PM by izzi »

Offline charbo

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #42 on: January 16, 2011, 11:21:23 PM »
iz,

If you know the protein percentages of the starting flour, the VWG, and target flour, you can compute the amount of VWG to add.  Pete-zza has a calculator I think.  However, a generous amount would be 1 tbs per cup of flour.  You have a little over 2 cups of flour, including the preferment.  Try 2 tbs of VWG (blended with the flour) plus 1 tbs and 2 tsp more water.   Good luck.

cb

Edit:  The hydration of the biga looks high.  I would dial it back to no more than 75%, saving the remaining water for the main dough.  The biga yeast % also looks high, unless the temp is low.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 10:44:20 AM by charbo »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #43 on: January 17, 2011, 04:39:52 PM »
If you know the protein percentages of the starting flour, the VWG, and target flour, you can compute the amount of VWG to add.  Pete-zza has a calculator I think. 

The tool was developed by member November. It is called the Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator and can be found at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/.

Peter

Offline izzi

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #44 on: January 18, 2011, 10:37:40 AM »
I used the tools and this is what I came up with after some changes and some reading about preferments.  I'm now a little confused but here is the recipe changed up.

Preferment:
Flour:        61.85 g
Water(65%):   40.20 g
IDY(.2%):      .14 g


Main Dough:
Preferment
Flour:          164.9 g
VWG:               6.46 g
Water(90%):     149.23 g
IDY (.5%):        1.06 g
Salt (1.4%):      2.96 g
Oil (3%):          6.35 g
Sugar (1.5%):   3.17 g

Offline charbo

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #45 on: January 18, 2011, 03:00:25 PM »
Your overall hydration is now 81.2% of the WW and VWG, which may be a little low considering the extra absorbance of VWG; but it should be easy to handle.  Yeast measurement looks challenging.

Offline izzi

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #46 on: January 18, 2011, 09:39:36 PM »
Yeah after doing some more reading I thought that the hydration maybe a little low.  Is the yeast correct?  I'm gonna make a bigger test with the same %'s than this cause now it's kinda hard with the measurements.

Offline jim baugh

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #47 on: January 20, 2011, 05:35:23 PM »
I use about have WWW and the rest high gluten and or bread flour. Makes for a great tasty crust. I also use it in my Baguette recipe. THe WWW is KAF. Love it, it does take more water, usually a cup or more.
Jim Baugh
« Last Edit: February 28, 2011, 09:04:56 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline izzi

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #48 on: February 28, 2011, 08:20:12 PM »
Hey charbo I finally got to try the recipe that we formulated above and the pizza turned out alright.  Good taste but didn't seem to brown up/leopard as well as using villa's recipe(w/ sub www) and also lacked some of the airiness.  Any thoughts on what might cause this?  Also I wondered how I might add a soaker to this recipe.  I have read the posts but got a little lost.   Thanks for the help

Offline charbo

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Re: White Whole Wheat
« Reply #49 on: March 01, 2011, 12:50:47 PM »
izzy,

Maybe you should post your complete recipe, including flours, equipment, processes, time, temperatures, and oven.

A 12-24 hour room-temp soaker allows time for amylase enzymes to convert damaged starch to sugar and for softening the bran.  Salt keeps protease in check.  Use salt and water percentages similar to the final dough.  The soaked flour might be 25-50% of the total flour.  At mix time, press the soaker and preferment together with wet hands and tear into small pieces.  Save some flour and water to speed the final mix.