Author Topic: the price of success  (Read 638 times)

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Offline waltertore

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the price of success
« on: December 02, 2013, 06:20:11 PM »
We just got a new proofing/heated holding cabinet with humidity control.  This is a big relief for proofing our bagels, artisan breads, and holding pizzas warm during our lunch rush.  Up till now we have been using a standard full sheet rack cart with a zipped heavy duty plastic cover for the proofing.  I put a large pot of boiled water on the bottom rack and then had to put it righ next to the pizza oven.  Needless to say with making over 400 bagels a day, this was a drag.  Now we are plugged in and dial in temp and humiidity.  Todays bagels were a breeze.    Also our washer went out today.  Turns out is is a piece of junk-one of these new top load high efficency, aggitatorless, things.  The repairman told me they last 2-5 years and the repair cost for it was not worth it.  The cool thing was this guy was a former special education student and a drummer.  So we hit it right off.  He wouldn't take any money for a service call but did take a load of pizza, cookies, brownies, with him.  They refurbish machines and he reccomended we get an old school agitator washer.  They are easy to repair and last a long time.  In the meantime I am getting towels from a local commercial linnen supplier for $35/week.  Next due up to die is our 2 range tops that boil our bagels.   Luckily we have plenty of money in our account to handle all this stuff.   The price of success :)
The Smiling With Hope Bakery- A bakery with a purpose
http://www.newarkadvocate.com/article/20140124/NEWS01/301240031/Bakery-run-by-students-disabilities-earns-pizza-profile

Spontobeat- the spontaneous music concept I have created and how I spontaneously live my life   http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137 200 of my most current songs http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137&content=widgets


Offline Musky

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Re: the price of success
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2013, 06:39:13 PM »
I haven't been around the forum that long, but boy, I sure do enjoy reading your posts.  I've read you did a lot of traveling while playing the blues, you wouldn't by chance recall playing a little bar in Milwaukee called the Up and Under?  I saw a lot of acts in that little place. 

Congratulations on how well you're doing.  It's tremendously admirable.

Kevin

Offline waltertore

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Re: the price of success
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2013, 07:05:01 PM »
Hi Kevin:  I never did play in Milwaukee.  Most of my travels were on the coasts, the south, and overseas.  Sadly well over 90% of the places I played with my band and or with the old bluesmen are long gone.  The days of people paying $5-10 to see a show in a room of 50-200 people are gone too.  The youth of today has not keep the flame alive.  I guess the excess of technology-youtube and such has ruined live music.  I was blessed to find teaching when I did.  The scene was dying in Austin and I went to college.  I had no idea the scene would ever decline to its present state.  My friends that are still full time musicians are either living in poverty or barely above it.  A few, like Charlie Sexton, who plays with Dylan, are still making it.  But the majority of us never made it to that level but still were able to play 200-300 dates a year and survive.  I bet if I worked my butt off booking gigs I would be lucky to play 50 dates a year, all over the world, for pennies.  I would need 50k to subsidize it.  My approach to music was shunned by the music industry.  They offered me fame and fortune if I would do music the standard way- write, rehearse, record, repeat, the same songs everynight.  My totally spontaneous approach attracted lots of famous musicians.  they would play in my band, have me open their tours, help me get gigs.  Still, I worked most of those years in bakeries/pizzerias/landscaping/manpower manual labor.  I have friends that have won grammies and are penniless.  I went from 250 dates a year to none.  In the past 2 years I have played 3 gigs.  They were ones where people came to listen. I won't play unless that is present.  luckily I have found the recording studio to bring in all the best vibes from all the best gigs I ever played. I have a state of the art studio on our property and record about a cd a day in it.  I don't have to travel anymore, don't have to lug my gear, deal with drugged/drunken/insane idiots, and start and stop when I want.  Money no longer plays into my survival with music.  I am so blessed to have my music, my baker/pizzeria, work with great kids, get great pay/benefits.  Many of musician friends come by from around the world.  They stay in my studio and we make recordings.  It has a full bath and everything.  Any pizza lovers that are passing through are welcome to it as well.  It is very sad to see how little our culture today values live music.  It has erroded to the obscene big ticket price affairs or the play for free in a corner of a coffe shop or such place where no one even knows you are playing.  Back in my day people came out in numbers to support live music.  It was part of the culture.  I feel sorry for the youth of today.  A culture with live music as it is today is a depressing thing.   Walter


here are some pictures from back in the day of when live music was alive and well

with my longtime bassist james "rock bottom" dupree at the brussels jazz club (toots thielman use to listen)
 
at the black cat lounge in austin tx.  it was the craziest club in Tx and I was the house band for 8 years(that old fender jazzmaster was given to me by stevie vaughn) Austin was a special place back then

on tour with actor harry dean stanton and the band The Call

with Johnny B Good - an Oakland CA legend @ the deluxe inn- a real juke joint

with my adopted father lousiana red in belgium
« Last Edit: December 02, 2013, 07:18:55 PM by waltertore »
The Smiling With Hope Bakery- A bakery with a purpose
http://www.newarkadvocate.com/article/20140124/NEWS01/301240031/Bakery-run-by-students-disabilities-earns-pizza-profile

Spontobeat- the spontaneous music concept I have created and how I spontaneously live my life   http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137 200 of my most current songs http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137&content=widgets

Offline Musky

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Re: the price of success
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2013, 07:51:18 PM »
That's some cool stuff.  I saw a lot of bands of varying fame and fortune through the years, many of them in small clubs.  I saw a number of Sun Record Rockabilly guys, including Charlie Feathers in '81 or '82.  I attended a Willy Deville show in Milwaukee until 2:30 am or so, hopped in a car with my buddy and drove to Washington, DC to see Charlie the next night.  Now they use his song That Certain Female in a Visa commercial with Drew Brees.  Probably more money than he made in his entire life if he was still alive.  Though I saw a lot of blues shows, I saw a lot more rockabilly, new wave, and what they now call Americana.  Steve Earle, Joe Eli, Dave and Phil Alvin both individually and with The Blasters.  Lots of singer/songwriters from TX through the years.  In the late '70s to the mid '80s Milwaukee had a number of small clubs where you could see up and comers in small settings.  Those clubs are no more.  The bar I mentioned, The Up and Under, booked a lot of southern and Chicago bluesmen.  Every Tuesday and Thursday night for years. 

I once saw John Lee Hooker at Summerfest, a huge music festival in Milwaukee held on the shore of Lake Michigan.  He sat on a chair and played and sang.  It was fantastic.  I can remember Big Legs, Tight Skirt like it was yesterday.

Kevin

Offline waltertore

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Re: the price of success
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2013, 08:10:52 PM »
Kevin:  I played with/knew many of the names you mentioned.  You know what I a talking about with the club scene being dead today.  I lived with Louisiana Red, helped Sonny terry get around, backed up Lightning Hopkins whenever he played NYC, started out with Wilbert Harrison as a teen.  I dedicated my life 24/7 to my music.  My wife knew going into our relationship that music was my driving force and I had to follow it blindly.  Luckily she is still with me 34 years later!  As I type these words I realize that I rarely think about all these days anymore.  I am so far out of the music loop now and most of my musician friends are dead.  I was lucky as teen to have the old blues guys take me in.  I could go on for hours about all the great times, gigs, traveling the highways, listening to Jimmy Carl Black talk about being frank zappa and the mothers drummer/jamming/hanging with hendrix, and the memories are endless.  Fast floyd use to play with me.  He was a member of Mink Deville.  I also use to play with Buddy Bowser and David Johansan of the New york dolls.  I ran the spectrum from jazz guys, to punk, blues, country, rock.  Dwight Yokum, a friend, used my 1963 caddy on his video guitar cadillacs.  He paid my rent for the month. It was a landmark video that he controlled.  It started the fast movement from shot to shot.  Up till then it was more of a one camera thing.  Anyway, thanks for bringing back so many great memories.  I hope someday I get to play good gigs again.  I am no where near done with music and feel my stuff today is at the peak of my growth.   See you.  Walter

a few more shots

with albert collin/lonnie brooks at the lone star cafe nyc
with will/charlie sexton stubbs bbq austin tx
with buddy bowser of the new york dolls bottom line nyc
with freddie roulette at the tatoo and blues fest
as my 1 man band set up in northern ca
The Smiling With Hope Bakery- A bakery with a purpose
http://www.newarkadvocate.com/article/20140124/NEWS01/301240031/Bakery-run-by-students-disabilities-earns-pizza-profile

Spontobeat- the spontaneous music concept I have created and how I spontaneously live my life   http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137 200 of my most current songs http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137&content=widgets