Author Topic: Moby Culture  (Read 2898 times)

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Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2013, 01:50:24 PM »
Mmmph, mbrulato and chasepn: Thanks for your nice comments.  This starter is pretty fantastic I must say.  Really great lift on the loaves.  I cut the first loaf open just now and I did get a nice crumb too.  I got some of those translucent shiny bubbles that you get when the bread is just about right.  The flavor is wonderful. Very mild tang, really nice texture.  All in all I would say that the Moby culture is a winner for bread. 


Offline mbrulato

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2013, 02:15:13 PM »
Tin,

What was your workflow like?  Other than ciabatta, I need practice in the high hydration breads dept.  I can't seem to get them to stay put in the shape of yours.  They much rather behave like "The Blob"  :-D. Maybe I need to do more stretch and folds.  Did you use a proofing basket?  When you baked, did you use a stone, steel, WFO?  How long, temps, etc.? Any advice is appreciated.

Mary Ann
Mary Ann

Online Mmmph

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2013, 02:46:24 PM »
Mmmph, mbrulato and chasepn: Thanks for your nice comments.  This starter is pretty fantastic I must say.  Really great lift on the loaves.  I cut the first loaf open just now and I did get a nice crumb too.  I got some of those translucent shiny bubbles that you get when the bread is just about right.  The flavor is wonderful. Very mild tang, really nice texture.  All in all I would say that the Moby culture is a winner for bread.

WOW...again, WOW.
I knew I got lucky with this culture.
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #23 on: October 25, 2013, 03:44:14 PM »
Tin,

What was your workflow like?  Other than ciabatta, I need practice in the high hydration breads dept.  I can't seem to get them to stay put in the shape of yours.  They much rather behave like "The Blob"  :-D. Maybe I need to do more stretch and folds.  Did you use a proofing basket?  When you baked, did you use a stone, steel, WFO?  How long, temps, etc.? Any advice is appreciated.

Mary Ann
Yes, more stretch & folds will help build the structure so it will hold its shape when they bake. I've had the same problem sometimes with "blob-like" loaves.  The loaves are baked in a pan so you don't need a baking stone with this method.  I did use proofing baskets, which I commandeered from my wife, who used to use them for serving crackers, etc.  I have some cane baskets on order so maybe then I will get some "Bakeshack" style loaves (I hope!). 

The workflow is (courtesy of Flour Water Salt Yeast but with a few tweaks from me):

Feed the Levain. 24 hours after your previous feeding, feed the levain again: take 100 grams of active levain and combine with 400 grams of white flour, 100 grams of whole wheat flour, and 400 grams of water at 85 degrees and mix by hand until just incorporated. Cover and let rest at room temp. for 7 to 9 hours.  (you could reduce the amount of this by half if you don't want to have a lot of levain left over.)

Autolyse.  After 7 to 9 hours mix 804 grams of white flour, 50 grams of rye flour and 26 grams of whole wheat flour by hand in a 12 quart tub. Add 684 grams of water at 90-95 degrees and mix by hand until just incorporated. Cover and let rest for 20-30 min.

Mix the Dough. Sprinkle 22 grams salt evenly over the top of the dough.  Add 216 grams of the levain and using wet hands, mix by hand until the levain and salt are fully integrated into the dough.  Target dough temp. is 77 degrees.

Fold.  Do 3-4 folds giving half an hour or so between folds.  Allow the dough to develop for 12-15 hours at room temp. 

Divide.  Once the Dough is nearly triple its original volume, divide into two equal portions. 

Shape.  Shape two loaves and let them rest on the counter top for ten minutes. Shape again, then place in two proofing baskets lined with linen cloths and sprinkled lightly with white flour (I like Caputo for this.)  Proof the loaves for 3-4 hours at room temp. The dough is ready when you can push a dent in it with your finger and it does not spring back.  Don't allow the loaves to over proof. 

Preheat Oven.  At least 45 min. before baking, heat the oven to 525 and put a large heavy covered casserole into the oven to preheat. (I use Le Creuset, but any large heavy covered pan will do.) 

Bake the Loaves. When the casserole is good and hot, take it out of the oven, take the cover off, plop the loaf into it, slash, cover, and return to the oven. Reduce the oven heat to 475.  Bake for 30 minutes covered, then remove the cover and bake another 10-15 minutes until the loaf is a deep brown color.  When the first loaf is done, heat the oven and casserole back to 525 before loading the second loaf for baking. Remember to turn the oven back down to 475 when you put the second loaf in. 

Thats it!  BTW, Ken Forkish's book is really a good book for people who are just getting started with natural starters; I recommend it highly.  Many great recipes for both yeast breads and naturally leavened. Great pizza recipes too! 

Regards,

TinRoof


Offline texmex

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #24 on: October 27, 2013, 12:45:38 PM »
Wow... for sure!  :drool:

 I took a slow growth approach to feeding MOBY/FEAR (started with 10 grams of dried starter 30 grams of water and 20 grams flour)  left it all day and though it had very little activity, I fed another 25 grams of flour and water that evening. By morning there were many small bubbles and a nice sweetish odor. I stirred in another 25/25 which doubled, but was still not very bubbly by noon, so fed again and left that to ferment until I got home about 1 am and the starter had doubled nicely with tons of bubbles.  What a heady smell! I was going to feed again last night, but somehow I forgot (too many beers) and found MOBY to be a little spent this morning so I fed him right away...within 2 hours he doubled again. 

I gotta say, he responds much more quickly than my homegrown starter once activity became apparent. 

Since I use a large amount of starter in my bread and make 4 loaves per batch, I just removed the bulk of this starter from the jar, fed the jar and stuck it in the fridge.  The rest is also fed for the exact starter amount I need for my sourdough bread recipe and resting at room temp.  I'll mix the dough this afternoon, and should have loaves baking in the eve or tomorrow morning. 
Reesa

Offline red kiosk

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2013, 04:24:38 PM »
Mmmph,

Whoa, I feel like the unworthy here and am jealous of those baking with it already. Waiting for a good time to start MY well-appreciated, Cape Fear sample. Sometimes life gets in the way of life (actually my business took off crazy-like from an unexpected dormant period) and I'm simply scramblin' and smilin'! It's sitting on the kitchen counter and it will happen soon. Pics, of course will follow. Thanks again and take care!

Jim
The pathologically precise are annoying, but right!

Online DenaliPete

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #26 on: October 30, 2013, 05:45:30 AM »
Appears I missed out on a good thing.

Mmmph, should you throw out another sweepstakes on your starter, I hope to be diligent enough to see.

Pete

Offline texmex

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #27 on: October 30, 2013, 10:00:18 AM »
Been very busy but I did manage to bake bread!
Silly me, no crumb shot! 

Yesterday I did a sniff test comparison of starters.  MOBY sure smells a bit more sophisticated.

I'll make some pizza dough soon.
Thanks again Mmmph!
Reesa

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #28 on: October 30, 2013, 10:15:01 AM »
Those look tasty!  I really need to stop logging onto this forum when I'm hungry :)
Mary Ann

Online Mmmph

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #29 on: October 30, 2013, 10:21:08 AM »
WOW...It just keeps getting better and better....
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato


Offline texmex

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #30 on: November 03, 2013, 02:16:15 PM »
Cape Fear crumb shots
Reesa

Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #31 on: November 03, 2013, 02:30:39 PM »
Good looking, Tex!  Looks like delicious bread. 

Offline texmex

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #32 on: November 03, 2013, 03:03:11 PM »
Thanks tin, delicious for sure! It has a very subtle sourness and the rise was fantastic! I love this supersoft sourdough recipe which does well in loaf pans or free-form.  It's all about kneading overkill, but I don't like butter dripping through big holes!

I'm happy to have a different nuance in flavor as my own culture is quite sour. (I named him CHUCK because he smelled a bit like up-chuck at the beginning stages)
Mmmph's grape culture is so much more refined and dignified, I think. LOL

Just now prepping to use my last pizza dough balls and will try MOBY in pizza in a few weeks when I come back from Houston.
Reesa

Online Mmmph

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #33 on: November 03, 2013, 03:59:25 PM »
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Offline Peasant

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #34 on: November 25, 2013, 10:07:32 PM »
I thought I would piggyback this thread since Mmmph referenced it for other users' results with the Cape Fear culture in the second round offering:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,28464.0.html

I did get it into pizza balls but I wasn't happy with my method (balls were really tight and not extensible).  I most likely let the dough bulk too long for the amount of culture in it and I wasn't happy with the size of the pies.  However I did make very delicious Tartine-style sourdoughs (attached).  I had similar observations as tinroofrusted.  The starter was very bubbly, almost like soap, after activating it.  And as far as taste and smell, there's a slight sourness (much less than my own culture) and very pleasant sweet smell.  I'll try it again in a less rushed manner in a couple weeks  :P

Offline Peasant

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #35 on: November 25, 2013, 10:07:49 PM »
Thanks again Mmmph!

Online Mmmph

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #36 on: November 26, 2013, 09:04:21 AM »
WOW! You sure make a good looking hunk of bread.
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Offline texmex

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #37 on: December 21, 2013, 01:35:46 PM »
Just wanted to update on this fine starter.  I have neglected my own starter --ie: it has not seen dough since Moby came to roost.  ;D 

I've been very pleased with the way this culture just bounces into action soon after it is fed.  I was very surprised to see that it blooms in my fridge as well, where my own does not until it has been at room temp at least a day.

I normally just take out the majority of the Moby starter and place it in a bowl, weighing the amount. I then feed my remaining residue starter container with 100 grams water and 100 grams flour, and stick it back in the fridge -it always blooms after a 3 or 4 days in fridge-if I'm not already using it again sooner to bake more loaves, whereas my own starter won't do this. (sometimes I actually put my starter residue in a clean container before feeding it and storing in fridge, but not always)

I feed my bowl of weighed starter the same 100/100, cover it and let that sit out overnight.  In my cold kitchen it gets nice bubbles and then I feed it the remainder of flour/water needed for my specific recipe and it is normally ready to  use in 4 to 6 hours.  I have been baking so much bread with this lovely starter that I forgot what pizza tastes like!
Reesa

Offline Peasant

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #38 on: December 22, 2013, 07:39:15 PM »
Hey Mmmph, is this really just a wild culture? I just took the dormant starter out of the fridge yesterday morning. After feeding it around midnight, it looked so bubbly and active I considered just using it without another refresher feeding!

This stuff is nuts

Online Mmmph

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Re: Moby Culture
« Reply #39 on: December 22, 2013, 08:07:22 PM »
It is 100% wild captured.

It's good. That's why I shared it.
Just wanted to see if others would
have the same successes as I've had.

Enjoy!
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato