Author Topic: Controlling enzymatic activity when falling behind schedule  (Read 422 times)

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Offline JD

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Controlling enzymatic activity when falling behind schedule
« on: October 22, 2013, 08:36:00 AM »
Let's say you planned to make a 24 hour dough using a natural starter, and at hour 18 you notice your yeast isn't on schedule for "on-time delivery". The obvious thing to do is increase fermentation temp, but this will also increase enzymatic activity and start to degrade your dough. After 6 more hours, it may have a detrimental effect to the strength of your dough, so what would be the best option to produce an optimal dough in this scenario?
Josh


Offline scott123

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Re: Controlling enzymatic activity when falling behind schedule
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2013, 08:53:31 AM »
Unless you're dealing with a very small amount of yeast/yeast equivalent in the formula and a very long fermentation (longer than 3 days) or an unusually wet dough, I don't see enzyme derived atrophy being that much of an issue.

In other words, if a dough is enzymatically 'ready' at 18 hours, it should still be perfectly fine at 24. It might spread during this time, but spreading isn't necessarily a sign of atropy.

Offline JD

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Re: Controlling enzymatic activity when falling behind schedule
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2013, 10:00:06 AM »
This past weekend I had to bump the fermentation temp of a 24 hour dough from ~75* to minimum 85*. I had a very weak dough in the end, and honestly I'm just assuming it's from excess enzymatic activity due to the high temps.

I was using an Ischia starter and not commercial yeast, which I also believe accelerates degradation of gluten...
Josh

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Controlling enzymatic activity when falling behind schedule
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2013, 11:21:39 AM »
I could see how this might be a problem if you had a weak starter - say it had been too long since it was last fed and the flora was weak/dying yet it has high enzymatic activity.

Assuming your bake time is fixed and inflexible, it would seem you have two choices: 1) keep it at the same temp and bake it whether or not it is as fermented as you would like (not necessarily as bad as it sounds), or 2) warm it up. I think there are too many variables to give a one-size-fits-all answer.
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Offline JD

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Re: Controlling enzymatic activity when falling behind schedule
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2013, 11:47:29 AM »
I could see how this might be a problem if you had a weak starter - say it had been too long since it was last fed and the flora was weak/dying yet it has high enzymatic activity.

Assuming your bake time is fixed and inflexible, it would seem you have two choices: 1) keep it at the same temp and bake it whether or not it is as fermented as you would like (not necessarily as bad as it sounds), or 2) warm it up. I think there are too many variables to give a one-size-fits-all answer.

I usually shoot for #2... maybe I'll try #1 next time this happens.

You're probably right about the weak starter though, no reason it shouldn't perform as anticipated.
Josh

Offline JimmyG

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Re: Controlling enzymatic activity when falling behind schedule
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2013, 09:27:19 AM »
JD,
I know I am chiming in here a little late, but I personally would not be too concerned about temp. While true that increasing heat does speed up enzyme kinetics (how fast an enzymatic reaction will occur), many protease, lipase and amylase enzymes in flour have pH optimums around 3-4. Thus meaning that add little more heat probably wont effect the enzymes in the dough as decreasing the pH. So in regards to your dough, I would probably worry less about heat having negative effects and warm up the dough to reach the desired end-product.
Good Luck
Jim
Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.


 

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