Author Topic: Re: Sourdough Starter and Effects of Iodized Salt on Fermentation (Split Topic)  (Read 684 times)

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Offline JD

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Has anyone noticed issues in the red highlighted area? For the third week in a row I've been under-fermented and my starter nearly tripled before I used it. 

« Last Edit: October 30, 2013, 01:45:57 PM by Pete-zza »
Josh


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2013, 07:43:56 PM »
I've done 75F @ 1%, and I do 65F at 1.3% all the time. Both work. I can't think of a reason why the points in between would be off by a significant margin - let alone 3X?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline JD

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2013, 10:48:14 PM »
I've done 75F @ 1%, and I do 65F at 1.3% all the time. Both work. I can't think of a reason why the points in between would be off by a significant margin - let alone 3X?


Thanks, I figured it wasn't an issue. I don't know what is going on but this is the third week in a row I've been disappointed. Never had this problem in the past, but I was using a much higher % yeast.



Josh

Offline JD

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2013, 08:35:24 AM »
I've done 75F @ 1%, and I do 65F at 1.3% all the time. Both work. I can't think of a reason why the points in between would be off by a significant margin - let alone 3X?


Craig,

Do you use Iodized salt? I do and this is the only possible answer I have for my (lack of) yeast activity. I'm wondering if 3% iodized salt is too much for 2% Ischia.


Not knowing the validity of this website http://www.cooksinfo.com/bread-machines, I found this quote:

"Use non-iodized salt. Iodine really hurts yeast activity."



Josh

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2013, 09:12:27 AM »
Craig,

Do you use Iodized salt? I do and this is the only possible answer I have for my (lack of) yeast activity. I'm wondering if 3% iodized salt is too much for 2% Ischia.


Not knowing the validity of this website http://www.cooksinfo.com/bread-machines, I found this quote:

"Use non-iodized salt. Iodine really hurts yeast activity."


I don't use iodized salt. I'm at 2.8%. I don't know if iodine is a problem or not. It's certainly an antiseptic, but we're talking about pretty small quantities here.

Your starter is fully active, has been out of the fridge for at least a few days and been fed a couple times? If you feed it, it will double in a couple hours?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline JD

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2013, 09:34:08 AM »
Your starter is fully active, has been out of the fridge for at least a few days and been fed a couple times? If you feed it, it will double in a couple hours?

Without a doubt, I fed it for 3 days before I used it. When it was finally time to make dough, the starter tripled after 3.5 - 4 hours.
Josh

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2013, 09:53:28 AM »
Without a doubt, I fed it for 3 days before I used it. When it was finally time to make dough, the starter tripled after 3.5 - 4 hours.

Have you tried any other points on the chart that did work?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline JD

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2013, 10:46:11 AM »
Have you tried any other points on the chart that did work?

Absolutely. I've done many doughs from probably 4-20% where the results were very close to the prediction model. I really feel like I did absolutely everything correct this past weekend and ended up with a highly under-fermented dough. I'm not talking an hour or two either, but many many hours under as if my yeast were nearly dead.

I'll try to make some experimental 2% Ischia dough this week, one with iodized salt and one with sea salt. 
Josh

Offline JD

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2013, 07:07:53 PM »
I made a mini-dough consisting of only flour, water & Ischia. I cut the mini dough in half exactly by weight, kneaded an equal volume of sea salt into one, and Iodized salt in the other.

The volume aspect of two different salt types may be skewing the results, but regardless at 3% salt I'm seeing more fermentation in the sea-salt dough after 24 hours.

Thoughts?

« Last Edit: October 29, 2013, 07:35:50 PM by JD »
Josh

Offline Serpentelli

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2013, 10:51:42 PM »
I made a mini-dough consisting of only flour, water & Ischia. I cut the mini dough in half exactly by weight, kneaded an equal volume of sea salt into one, and Iodized salt in the other.

The volume aspect of two different salt types may be skewing the results, but regardless at 3% salt I'm seeing more fermentation in the sea-salt dough after 24 hours.

Thoughts?

Why did you measure the salt by volume? I know that you know the difference in crystal size, so I'm not exactly sure why you wouldn't expect the dough with more salt (the iodized salt dough) to ferment less. I'd be more interested to see the difference between dough with the same % by weight of salt, with the only difference being the type of salt.

John K
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Offline JD

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2013, 11:38:32 PM »
Why did you measure the salt by volume? I know that you know the difference in crystal size, so I'm not exactly sure why you wouldn't expect the dough with more salt (the iodized salt dough) to ferment less. I'd be more interested to see the difference between dough with the same % by weight of salt, with the only difference being the type of salt.

John K


John,

I don't have a scale that would accurately measure that small a quantity. I used a spice mortar to make the sea salt very fine, so I don't think the weight would be off by that much. It was only an eighth of a teaspoon...



** Edit **

I found an old thread from Peter listing different salts & their respective densities:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2461.msg21442.html#msg21442

I did some quick math to compare an eighth teaspoon of sea salt and table salt, and the difference in weight would only be (theoretically) 0.04 grams.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2013, 08:13:21 AM by JD »
Josh

Offline JD

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Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2013, 11:28:36 AM »
I had the topic split because I'd like to keep up this discussion without taking away from the predictive model thread. Please let me know if anyone has experience with Iodized salt causing fermentation issues.
Josh

Offline Serpentelli

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Re: Re: Sourdough starter quantity predictive model (Split Topic)
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2013, 12:24:09 PM »
John,

I don't have a scale that would accurately measure that small a quantity. I used a spice mortar to make the sea salt very fine, so I don't think the weight would be off by that much. It was only an eighth of a teaspoon...



** Edit **

I found an old thread from Peter listing different salts & their respective densities:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2461.msg21442.html#msg21442

I did some quick math to compare an eighth teaspoon of sea salt and table salt, and the difference in weight would only be (theoretically) 0.04 grams.


You may be right in terms of your predictions, but I for one do not know how sensitive the yeast is to even small changes in tonicity. Therefore the only true scientific way to measure this would be to use exactly the same weight of salt. You could always use Craig's method for making small measurements without a micro-scale --- dissolve an amount that is measurable with your equipment in a set volume of water and use whatever volume of (water + dissolved salt) you want to get to the appropriate percentage of dissolved ingredient.

John K
I'm not wearing hockey pads!


 

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